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Science

Captain Ahab's Revenge: Brewing Beer From An Ancient Whale Bone

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Yeast scraped from a 35-million-year-old whale fossil is the key ingredient in a "paleo ale" from a Virginia brewery. Like many scientific innovations, the idea came about late one night over a pint.

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Calorie Counting Machine May Make Dieting Easier In The Future

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Tracking the calories in food you eat can be tedious. But a GE scientist is working on a device that fits over your plate and automatically tells you exactly how much energy is in your meal.

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Why Smartphone Breaks At Work Aren't Such A Bad Idea

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Playing a quick game or taking a moment to connect with family or friends benefits both employees and their employers, a new study finds.

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Morning Edition

Watch And Learn: Wave-Particle Quantum Weirdness

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Understanding how things work in the quantum world is both fun and mind-bending. Physicist Adam Frank suggests spending a minute watching this video on the wave-particle duality.

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Morning Edition

Underwater Meadows Might Serve As Antacid For Acid Seas

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Marine biologists worry that certain species won't survive the shifts in sea acidity that climate change brings. But research on sea grasses along California's coast suggest marine preserves can help.

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Morning Edition

When Work Becomes A Haven From Stress At Home

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Moms who worked full time reported significantly better physical and mental health than moms who worked part time, research involving more than 2,500 mothers found.

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All Things Considered

This Is Your Stressed-Out Brain On Scarcity

Monday, July 14, 2014

When we don't have enough of something — love, time or money — we spend extraordinary effort worrying about how to get by, research shows. The stress of poverty changes the way people think.

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All Things Considered

Do We Choose Our Friends Because They Share Our Genes?

Monday, July 14, 2014

You and your friends may have more than music and movies in common. Friends typically have more genetic similarities than strangers, researchers say. That may have evolutionary advantages.

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PRI's The World

Could reading a newspaper save you from dengue fever?

Monday, July 14, 2014

A Sri Lankan paper recently tried a new way to fight disease: printing the news using mosquito-repelling ink. But no one knows for sure if such moves are effective — or just a creative advertising stunt.

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Pathogens On A Plane: How To Stay Healthy In Flight

Monday, July 14, 2014

We all think of airplanes as hotbeds for diseases. But how easily do pathogens spread on jets? One travel doctor explains what he does to keep from bringing home microbial stowaways.

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The Takeaway

Why Environmental Crime Goes Unpunished

Monday, July 14, 2014

A new investigation finds that existing environmental regulations are rarely enforced — and environmental crimes are almost never prosecuted.

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The Takeaway

Why Is It So Hard to Test for Lyme Disease?

Monday, July 14, 2014

Summer is prime time for the tick-borne illness; some 300,000 people contract it every year. But a regulatory loophole means the market for Lyme disease tests is unreliable — and highly lucrative.

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Facing A Toxic Dump In South Africa, He Cleaned Up

Monday, July 14, 2014

Desmond D'Sa fought a landfill that took over a beautiful valley and sickened residents with its awful smell. He lost his job but won the battle — and the Goldman Environmental Prize.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: An Escalating Conflict, The World Cup's Legacy, and A New Look at Hemingway

Monday, July 14, 2014

1. Tensions Between Israel & Hamas Escalate | 2. Benghazi, Citigroup, and The DOJ's Curious Timing | 3. Why Is It So Hard to Test for Lyme Disease? | 4. The Legacy of the 2014 World Cup | 5. Hemingway's Grandson Restores Never-Seen Elements to "The Sun Also Rises"

The Leonard Lopate Show

Race, Class and Schools

Monday, July 14, 2014

On today’s show we’ll explore the re-emergence of school segregation 60 years after the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. Sylvia Jukes Morris talks about the influence of politician and playwright Clare Boothe Luce. We'll find out about a legal battle over a Navy submarine detection system that uses high-intensity underwater sound—and drives whales to strand themselves on beaches. And, why golf is catching on in China and how it’s changing Chinese culture.

All Things Considered

Mark Your Calendars: In A Year, We'll Arrive At Pluto

Sunday, July 13, 2014

It takes a long time to travel 3 billion miles. On July 14, 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft will finally get a flyby glimpse of the dwarf planet, as part of a mission launched in 2006.

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Antares Blasts Off On ISS Supply Mission

Sunday, July 13, 2014

The rocket, built by commercial firm Orbital Sciences, carries an unmanned Cygnus capsule. It lifted off from a pad at Wallops Island, Va.

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Like Humans, Chimps Fall For Fashion Trends

Sunday, July 13, 2014

It's long been known that chimps learn from each other to make useful tools. Now researchers have seen them copy each other's "fashion statement," Dr. Katherine Cronin tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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Radiolab

The Most Astonishing Wave-Tracking Experiment Ever

Sunday, July 13, 2014

What if I told you that an ordinary-looking wave hitting your beach had traveled, intact, halfway across the planet? Would you believe me? Well, believe this.

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The Most Astonishing Wave-Tracking Experiment Ever

Sunday, July 13, 2014

What if I told you that an ordinary-looking wave hitting your beach had traveled, intact, halfway across the planet? Would you believe me? Well, believe this.

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