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Science

The Leonard Lopate Show

Why Great White Sharks Are Making a Comeback in NY and NJ

Thursday, July 17, 2014

After decades of decline, the population of great white sharks seems to be increasing off the Northeast coast.

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Freakonomics Radio

Why You Should Bribe Your Kids

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Educational messaging looks good on paper but kids don’t respond to it -- and adults aren’t much better.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Leaving America, Struggling to Stay in America

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Allan Sloan of Fortune magazine talks about the growing number of American companies reincorporating overseas in order to dodge US taxes. Filmmaker Michel Gondry tells us about his latest movie, “Mood Indigo,” and he’ll be joined by Audrey Tautou, who stars in it. Beth Macy with the story of how an American company struggled to compete with cheap furniture from China, and managed to keep manufacturing in Virginia, saving hundreds of jobs. We’ll look into why the population of great white sharks is rebounding off of the coast of New York and New Jersey. Plus, some Afghan and Iraqi interpreters who worked with the United States have been able to emigrate to this country, and we’ll find out why they’ve found little support here.  

Soundcheck

Music And Dementia In 'Alive Inside'; Camera Obscura Plays Live; The Fictional History Of The Theremin

Thursday, July 17, 2014

In this episode: The documentary Alive Inside is about the powerful impact that music can have on senior citizens with severe dementia. The film focuses on the work of one social worker, Dan Cohen, who joined us in 2012 to talk about his work. He returns to Soundcheck with the director of Alive Inside, Michael Rossato-Bennet.

Then: The latest album from the Scottish band Camera Obscura features cutting lyrics paired with soothing melodies. Hear Camera Obscura perform songs from their album, Desire Lines, in the Soundcheck studio, and reflects on coming backafter a hiatus and health struggles, and on Scotland's upcoming referendum on independence.

And: The theremin is an instrument that seems to be from the future. It’s played by waving your hands between two antennas -- without actually touching anything. But in fact, the theremin was invented almost a century ago, peaking in popularity in the 1950s, when its eerie sound appeared in film scores like The Thing and The Day The Earth Stood Still. And in 1966, the Beach Boys used an instrument called the Electro-Theremin, also known as the Tannerin, on their classic hit “Good Vibrations.” Now the theremin and its creator, Leon Theremin, are the subject of the new book by Sean Michaels, Us Conductors, a fictionalized take on the life of the instrument’s inventor.

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All Things Considered

This Dirty Little Weed May Have Cleaned Up Ancient Teeth

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Turns out that for 7,000 years, snacking on nutsedge may have helped people avoid tooth decay. But at some point, the root it lost its charm. By the 1970s, it was branded "the world's worst weed."

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All Things Considered

Even Among Babies, Practice Makes Perfect

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Babies as young as 7 months old are already rehearsing the motions behind speech, even though they can't talk yet. Robert Siegel speaks with the woman behind these findings — Patricia Kuhl, the co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at University of Washington.

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Dogs Carry Kissing Bug Disease In Texas And Latin America

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

From shelter mutts to show dogs, Texas canines are getting a parasite that causes heart problems in people. Dogs don't spread the parasite directly to humans. But they help to make it more prevalent.

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Radiolab

Neil Whosis? What You Don't Know About The 1969 Moon Landing

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The year he landed on the moon, astronaut Neil Armstrong was famous, iconic, an American hero. One year later he wasn't. In 1970, how many people remembered his name? This will surprise you.

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Neil Whosis? What You Don't Know About The 1969 Moon Landing

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The year he landed on the moon, astronaut Neil Armstrong was famous, iconic, an American hero. One year later he wasn't. In 1970, how many people remembered his name? This will surprise you.

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The Takeaway

Scientists Invent the World's Darkest Material

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Batman, Coco Chanel, and Johnny Cash all had a thing for classic black. But a new material is so strikingly dark, it makes these icons look like they're wearing faded gray. Vantablack is a color the human eye has never seen before.

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A Huge New Crater Is Found In Siberia, And The Theories Fly

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The crater is estimated at 262 feet wide and is in the northern Siberian area of Yamal, a name The Siberian Times says roughly translates as "the end of the world."

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Dialing Back Stress With A Bubble Bath, Beach Trip And Bees

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Socializing topped the list of stress reducers for those dealing with a great deal of stress, according to an NPR poll. Prayer, meditation, exercise and playing with pets were also common responses.

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The Takeaway

White House Introduces New Climate Measures

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The White House will announce a new round of initiatives to address natural disasters that are often caused by climate changeeverything from coastal flooding to storm surges to protecting areas prone to landslides and regions that experience rough drought conditions.

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Morning Edition

Coping With A Co-Worker's Body Odor Takes Tact

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Stinking on the job is a common problem, say pros in human resources, and a reluctance to use soap and water is rarely to blame. Medical conditions, diet or cultural differences can play a role, too.

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New Tech City

Treating Bipolar with a Microphone

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Amber Smith is bipolar. Her mood swings are dangerous. But she's testing new technology that could spot trouble early by detecting patterns in the sound of her voice.

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The Takeaway

Report Shows Disturbing Findings at CDC

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

An new investigation led by the U.S. Department of Agriculture into the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention raises new questions about the culture of safety in government laboratories.The USDA found anthrax stored in unlocked refrigerators, and missing containers of anthrax that had to be tracked down by the inspectors.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Manipulating The Internet, The Darkest Material Known to Man, and A Dystopian Future

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

1. A British Spy Agency is Manipulating the Internet | 2. White House Introduces New Climate Measures | 3. Scientists Invent the World's Darkest Material | 4. The Takeaway Book Club: 'Sleep Donation'

Stroke Rate May Be Declining In Older Adults

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Deaths from stroke are dropping too, a study suggests. But don't celebrate just yet. Diabetes, a big risk factor for these "brain attacks," is still on the rise.

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What's Going On In There? How Babies' Brains Practice Speech

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

It's not easy to scan a baby brain, so scientists used a kind of scanner that lets the infants wiggle at will. They could see how speech sounds activate motor regions in babies' brains.

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Captain Ahab's Revenge: Brewing Beer From An Ancient Whale Bone

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Yeast scraped from a 35-million-year-old whale fossil is the key ingredient in a "paleo ale" from a Virginia brewery. Like many scientific innovations, the idea came about late one night over a pint.

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