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Science

The Brian Lehrer Show

Hot Days and Heated Issues

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

We've been pretty lucky this summer — there haven't been many dog days — but we can't expect that to last. Today, a discussion about heat: What it does to our body and brain, how climate change will affect our society and day-to-day life, how artists visually interpret heat, and your anecdotes about growing up in hot cultures. Plus: New York City's response to immigration in the face of inaction by Congress, and a discussion about responses — immediately from first responders, and afterwards from community leaders — after the death of Eric Garner.

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Aggressive Propaganda, The Realities of Breast Cancer, and Outdoor Play as Medicine

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

1. In Russia, Propaganda Mounts Around MH17 Crash | 2. 'Under Her Skin': The Realities of Breast Cancer | 3. Could Jimmy Carter's Grandson Unseat a Governor? | 4. Doctors Prescribe New Medicine For Kids: Go Outside

The Takeaway

Women with Breast Cancer, Trying to Find Their Way Back to 'Normal'

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

African-American women with a breast cancer diagnosis face particularly difficult odds. Three black women fighting the disease document their experiences through audio diaries.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The World Around Us Shapes the Delusions Inside Us

Monday, July 21, 2014

On today’s show: Zelda la Grange grew up supporting the rules of apartheid in South Africa, but she later became one of Nelson Mandela’s most loyal and devoted aides. She tells us about working and traveling by Mandela’s side for almost two decades. Jonathan Demme, André Gregory, and Wallace Shawn discuss bringing their interpretation of Henrik Ibsen’s “A Master Builder” to the screen. We’ll investigate how interactions between the brain and the world around us can give rise to delusional thinking. Neuroscientist Nancy C. Andreasen looks into where creative genius comes from and why it’s so often accompanied by mental illness.

All Things Considered

Sixth-Grader's Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Florida native Lauren Arrington discovered that invasive lionfish, which usually live in the ocean, could survive in nearly fresh water. The 12-year-old's experiment blew away professional scientists.

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45 Years Ago, Armstrong Took His 'One Small Step'

Sunday, July 20, 2014

On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11's Lunar Module, Eagle, touched down in the moon's Sea of Tranquility, marking humankind's first journey to another world.

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Astronaut Who Walked On The Moon: 'It Was Science Fiction To Us'

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Forty-five years after man first walked on the moon, Alan Bean, who was part of the second lunar landing, talks to NPR's Arun Rath about his stormy launch and how he translates space travel into art.

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All Things Considered

With Malaysia Airlines Crash, A Loss For AIDS Research

Saturday, July 19, 2014

A number of scientists and others members of the AIDS research community died in the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine. NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with journalist and editor in chief of HIV Plus magazine Diane Anderson-Minshall about the loss.

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400,000+ Sign Petition To Move 'Sad Bear' To Better Life In Canada

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Arturo the polar bear, living in a cramped and hot zoo enclosure in Argentina, is the subject of an online campaign that includes former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

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In Tracking Bats, It Helps To Find Them Adorable

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Julia Hoeh is a bat tracker. For $350 a week plus basic housing in rural Tennessee, she stays up long after midnight to affix radio trackers to bats and collect samples of their DNA.

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People Share Moon Landing Memories On YouTube Channel

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Sunday is the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Buzz Aldrin about his new YouTube channel, where anyone can share memories from the historic day.

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What It Takes To Be A Champion

Saturday, July 19, 2014

TED Radio Host Guy Raz speaks with science writer and Sports Illustrated contributor David Epstein about why athletes are getting faster and stronger every year.

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The Takeaway

The Takeaway Weekender: Music and Memories, Literary Classics, and a Breakthrough in Science

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Welcome to The Takeaway Weekender! 

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WNYC News

Forty-Five Years of a Giant Leap

Friday, July 18, 2014

WNYC

On Sunday, America celebrates the 45th anniversary of the Moon landing.

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All Things Considered

A Pillar Of AIDS Research And Activism, Lost With Shot-Down Jet

Friday, July 18, 2014

Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 had been carrying several researchers and activists on their way to a global AIDS conference in Australia. Among them was Dr. Joep Lange, a leading researcher and former president of the International AIDS Society. He was a giant in the field and a mentor to many.

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Studio 360

How to Fly to Alpha Centauri

Friday, July 18, 2014

It’s a staple of sci-fi, but the realities of interstellar travel are grim: it would take tens of thousands of years to get to our nearest neighbor in the galaxy using current technology. But some scientists working on the problem think it can be cracked in about a century.

Slideshow: Starship Designs

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PRI's The World

When it comes to food, there's no end to this debate. Does it go in the fridge or on the counter?

Friday, July 18, 2014

Eggs: On the counter or in the fridge? How about butter? Or ketchup? It depends on who you ask. And while you might think it's gross, the risks, in many cases, are actually quite small.

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Morning Edition

When It Comes To Thinking, 2 Fish Heads Are Better Than 1

Friday, July 18, 2014

Maybe we can learn from fish — they don't call a group of them a school for nothing. Researchers found that when 2 fish swim together, they make better decisions than when 2 fish are swimming alone.

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Morning Edition

Head Scientist At CDC Weighs Costs Of Recent Lab Safety Breaches

Friday, July 18, 2014

The mishaps mean federal scientists need to "take a hard look" at all federal research on deadly pathogens and make sure, in each case, that the benefits justify risks, says Dr. Tom Frieden.

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Studio 360

Hacking the Climate

Friday, July 18, 2014

Geoengineering — tampering with the Earth’s climate — is a sci-fi idea that could very well become a reality. But it’s controversial, because it’s impossible to know the long-term effects of tampering with such a complex system.

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