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Robin Robertson

New Sounds

Folk-Inspired Ballads, Male Edition (Special Podcast)

Monday, March 24, 2014

WNYC

Listen to folk-inspired ballads, featuring male folk-singers & wandering minstrels on this New Sounds.  There are surreal songs from a haunting record, “Hirta Songs,” by Alistair Roberts and poet Robin Robertson, with texts inspired by the history, landscape and people of the remote Scottish archipelago of St. Kilda (about 100 miles off the coast of Scotland.)  The record is named after the largest of these islands, where the main employment was fowling the great quantities of sea birds.  (Sheep-herding, crofting and fishing were ways of life as well.)  The eerie songs we’ll hear are both based on Celtic melodies; "A Fall of Sleet," is based on the tune 'The Battle of Inverlochy.' while the other, "Exodus," concerns the 1930 voluntary evacuation of the islands and is based on two tunes.

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New Sounds

Abandoned Cities

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

On this New Sounds program, listen to a series of works about abandoned cities and towns. Sample works for prepared piano and electronics from German pianist and composer Hauschka (Volker Bertelmann)’s latest release, “Abandoned City,” inspired by different ghost towns throughout the world.  Then there’s music from Scotland’s Alasdair Roberts & Robin Robertson, from their excellent and stirring “Hirta Songs.” Listen to a work for piano by Sir Peter Maxwell Davies written in protest of the proposed uranium mine at Stromness, in Orkney, Scotland, along with another Hauschka work by the same name, but about a different locale - the whaling station on the South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic, “Stromness.”

 

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New Sounds

Folk-Inspired Ballads, Male Edition

Monday, March 03, 2014

Listen to folk-inspired ballads, featuring male folk-singers & wandering minstrels on this New Sounds.  There are surreal songs from a haunting record, “Hirta Songs,” by Alistair Roberts and poet Robin Robertson, with texts inspired by the history, landscape and people of the remote Scottish archipelago of St. Kilda (about 100 miles off the coast of Scotland.)  The record is named after the largest of these islands, where the main employment was fowling the great quantities of sea birds.  (Sheep-herding, crofting and fishing were ways of life as well.)  The eerie songs we’ll hear are both based on Celtic melodies; "A Fall of Sleet," is based on the tune 'The Battle of Inverlochy.' while the other, "Exodus," concerns the 1930 voluntary evacuation of the islands and is based on two tunes.

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