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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Rise of Populist Fear Mongering

Monday, May 28, 2012

From “Birthers” who claim that President Obama was not born in the United States to those who believe that the Constitution is in danger of being replaced with Sharia law, conspiratorial beliefs have become increasingly common in our public discourse. Arthur Goldwag explores the ideas and rhetoric that have animated extreme, mostly right-wing movements throughout American history. His new book is The New Hate: A History of Fear and Loathing on the Populist Right.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fear and Loathing on the Populist Right

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

From “Birthers” who claim that President Obama was not born in the United States to those who believe that the Constitution is in danger of being replaced with Sharia law, conspiratorial beliefs have become increasingly common in our public discourse. Arthur Goldwag explores the ideas and rhetoric that have animated extreme, mostly right-wing movements throughout American history. His new book is The New Hate: A History of Fear and Loathing on the Populist Right.

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The Takeaway

After The Takeaway: Celeste Discusses the Rhetoric of Europe's Right-Wing Parties

Thursday, July 28, 2011

After today's show, host Celeste Headlee reflects on the similarities between Anders Breivik's personal manifesto and the anti-Islam and anti-immigration platforms of many European right-wing parties. She remarks that it is troubling to see many of Europe's right-wing parties attempting to distance themselves from their previous platforms and rhetoric in the wake of the tragedy in Oslo, and urges us not to forget that words matter. Celeste emphasizes that language is important in all contexts, and suggests that everyone should think carefully before making statements that they aren't willing to stand behind in times of tragedy and conflict.

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The Takeaway

Europe's Right-Wing Parties Take International Spotlight

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Last weekend's tragedy in Oslo has drawn international attention to Europe's far-right political parties, which had been gaining power in several European nations in recent years. Confessed attacker Anders Breivik stated allegiance to their anti-immigration and anti-Islamic platforms. Where do these parties go from here? Can they tone down their rhetoric and maintain their niche in the political landscape?

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