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Morning Edition

Online, Researcher Says, Teens Do What They've Always Done

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

In the world of social media research, danah boyd is a star. She says most adults misread and overreact to the online lives of teenagers. But as the title of her new book suggests, It's Complicated.

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Morning Edition

At 4.4 Billion Years Old, Oz Crystals Confirmed As World's Oldest

Monday, February 24, 2014

Zircon crystals found in sandstone on an Australian sheep ranch are so tiny that you'd need a magnifying glass to see them. But recent measurements confirm they offer our earliest glimpse of Earth.

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Sit More, And You're More Likely To Be Disabled After Age 60

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

People tend to relax as they get older, and most people sit more. Each extra hour of sitting increases the odds that they won't be able to get out of bed or do other daily activities.

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Research Shows New Flu Viruses Often Arise In Domestic Animals

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Scientists have apparently been wrong about where new flu viruses come from, and they've underestimated the viruses' connection to horses. The dogma is that new viruses always incubate in wild migratory birds first, then get into domestic poultry, and then jump into mammals — especially pigs and humans.

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Here's One More Reason To Play Video Games: Beating Dyslexia

Friday, February 14, 2014

People with dyslexia take longer to alternate their attention between visual and audio cues, researchers say. That's particularly true if they have to attend to a sound after seeing something. That difference may provide clues to better treatments for dyslexia.

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Electronic Tongues Are The Beer Snobs Of The Future

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Researchers in Barcelona have developed an electronic tongue that really knows the difference between a pilsner and a bock. It's still a prototype, but its creators say it could some day replace human taste testers.

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Ladies: Good Bacteria In Yogurt May Be Good For Waistlines, Too

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Women who took a probiotic commonly found in yogurts daily while on a diet regime lost significantly more weight and fat than their counterparts who received a placebo. The findings offer interesting hints about how probiotics might be interacting with the tiny microbes that live in our guts.

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Our Brains Rewrite Our Memories, Putting Present In The Past

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Even people with good memories can have a hard time remembering the past accurately. That may be because the brain is constantly editing memories, updating them with current information. This may make good evolutionary sense. But it also means that some of your cherished memories may be wrong.

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Sap Discovery Could Turn Syrup-Making Upside Down

Sunday, February 02, 2014

For centuries, people thought sap had to flow down a tree's body through a spigot at the bottom. But researchers have discovered that sap can flow upwards, too, which allows syrup production from much younger trees, and could even turn maple syrup into a row crop.

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State Department: Keystone XL Would Not Worsen Warming

Saturday, February 01, 2014

The Keystone XL oil pipeline proposal cleared a significant hurdle Friday. The State Department concluded the project would not significantly worsen the problem of climate change. The decision has angered environmentalists, who don't want the project to go through.

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Your Nose Knows Which Foods Are Fattiest

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Low-fat ice cream just won't cut it for you? Maybe it's your nose telling you it's not the real deal. Researchers have found that people can actually smell differences in dietary fat in food. It's an ability that might have helped our ancestors find the best foods to survive on.

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Popular Testosterone Therapy May Raise Risk Of Heart Attack

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Men who take testosterone supplements double their risk of heart attacks, a study finds. That was true for men over 65 and for younger men with heart disease. Testosterone supplements have become increasingly popular as a way to counter flagging libido.

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A Milk Mystery: Did Gloomy Weather Make Us Love The Stuff?

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

The latest twist in this evolutionary whodunnit has us questioning whether the lack of vitamin D from the sun played any role in our complicated, sometimes dangerous, love affair with milk. New DNA analysis of ancient farmers from sunny Spain suggests that this theory may have gone sour.

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Stricter Autism Criteria Unlikely To Reduce Services For Kids

Monday, January 27, 2014

Researchers say changes rolled out last May are likely to have a bigger effect on government statistics than on the care of the nation's children. Still, advocates worry that narrower definitions could lead to a loss of coverage for some children.

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Contagious Cancer In Dogs Leaves Prehistoric Paw Prints

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Dogs can catch a strange type of cancer through sex. Now scientists have decoded the DNA of the tumor and found that the cancer cells are a living fossil of an ancient dog that lived thousands of years ago. This cancer doesn't affect people, but the findings may offer insights into how tumors fool the human immune system.

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Western Scientists Look To Chinese Medicine For Fresh Leads

Saturday, January 18, 2014

Some scientists say traditional remedies might help them crack diseases like cancer. Some notable successes include a treatment for a form of leukemia and an anti-malaria medicine that has become the gold standard. But there are more misses than hits.

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We Have A Science Tumblr, And Its Name Is 'Skunk Bear'

Monday, January 13, 2014

Follow Skunk Bear for quirky animations, intriguing videos, illustrations, GIFs, behind-the-scenes radio moments, dispatches from the intersection of science and culture, homemade lava recipes, underwater operas, and fascinating graphs hastily scrawled on napkins. It's all about science.

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Searching For The Science Behind Reincarnation

Sunday, January 05, 2014

Say a child has memories of being a Hollywood extra in the 1930s. Is it just an active imagination, or actual evidence of reincarnation? Jim Tucker, a psychologist at the University of Virginia studies hundreds of cases like this and joins NPR's Rachel Martin to share his research on the science behind reincarnation.

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Want Perfect Pitch? You Might Be Able To Pop A Pill For That

Saturday, January 04, 2014

The ability to identify musical notes by ear is usually thought to be something developed early in life. Now a Harvard study says a drug normally used as a mood stabilizer might allow adults with no musical experience to learn perfect pitch.

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How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World

Thursday, January 02, 2014

Research suggests that speaking another language fluently changes what you pay attention to and how you remember events. But some say the idea that language can make you see and think differently is overblown.

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