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Research News

Rare Diamond Points To Mass Quantities Of Water In Earth's Mantle

Thursday, March 13, 2014

A unique mineral trapped inside a unique diamond bolsters the theory that oceans of non-liquid water lurk hundreds of miles below the planet's surface.

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Morning Edition

Google's Flu Tracker Suffers From Sniffles

Thursday, March 13, 2014

It sounds like a good idea: anticipating flu's spread by monitoring a region's online searches. But sometimes a sneeze is just a cold.

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All Things Considered

Mix Of Gut Microbes May Play Role In Crohn's Disease

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Research involving more than 1,500 patients suggests people with Crohn's may have too many of the types of gut bacteria that tend to rile the immune system and too few that reduce inflammation.

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Morning Edition

Study: Boys Report PTSD When Moved Out Of Poverty

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

In the 1990s, the federal government launched a program to get single mothers out of public housing and into more affluent areas. David Greene talks to Ronald Kessler, the lead author of the study.

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Whole Genome Scans Aren't Quite Ready For Your Doctor's Office

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Wouldn't it be great to be able to scan your genes and find out your disease risk? Those scanners exist. But a test of their usefulness for medical care found them not as accurate as one would hope.

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Obesity Linked To Lower Grades Among Teen Girls

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The reason for the link isn't clear, but researchers say obesity's effect on self-image and self-esteem might be partly to blame.

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Morning Edition

Why Older Adults Have A Hard Time Letting Their Stuff Go

Monday, March 10, 2014

A study finds that people over 50 have difficulty getting rid of unneeded possessions. Some of this is for emotional reasons and some of it for physical ones.

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Morning Edition

Military Conflict Decisions: Why Weakness Leads To Aggression

Monday, March 10, 2014

Can a behavioral economics theory explain military standoffs such as the one in Crimea? Research on military conflicts shows that weakness, not strength, often leads to aggression.

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All Things Considered

The '60s Are Gone, But Psychedelic Research Trip Continues

Sunday, March 09, 2014

Since the 1970s, hallucinogens have been classified as Schedule I drugs, indicating they have no medical use. But researchers say there are benefits and that work must continue.

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Morning Edition

Alzheimer's Blood Test Raises Ethical Questions

Sunday, March 09, 2014

A new blood test for people in their 70s can detect who will develop Alzheimer's disease. A positive result could help people prepare. But since there's no treatment, will people really want to know?

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How Yosemite Keeps Its Bears' Paws Off Campers' Hamburgers

Thursday, March 06, 2014

The park's bears have developed a taste for human food, and that's gotten them in big trouble. But efforts to teach campers to lock up food are helping solve the problem, a bear hair analysis shows.

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All Things Considered

To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

Removing bacteria and other impurities from water could be done more cheaply thanks to researchers at MIT. They're taking advantage of the way trees move water to filter it.

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Beer As A Post-Workout Recovery Drink? Not As Crazy As It Sounds

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

A company claims to have created a "fit beer" that can help replenish the body after a workout. We turned to science to see if beer and exercise can really go hand-in-hand. The answer? Yes – and no.

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Virus Locked In Siberian Ice For 30,000 Years Is Revived In Lab

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

A team of scientists says it has reawakened an ancient pathogen. It's not dangerous to humans, but they warn that climate change could free potentially deadly organisms locked in permafrost.

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Morning Edition

When It Comes To Vaccines, Science Can Run Into A Brick Wall

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

The public health community has been trying for years to debunk the spurious connection people have been making between vaccines and autism. Have the messages been backfiring?

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Noise Machines To Help Babies Sleep Can Raise Quite A Din

Monday, March 03, 2014

Infant sleep machines, used to mask outside noise, can exceed recommended noise limits when played at high volume and placed close to a baby's sensitive ears.

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Ecological Stories Uncovered With Whale Bones In Chile

Sunday, March 02, 2014

Several years ago, construction workers in Chile found whale fossils from 6 to 9 million years ago. NPR's Jacki Lyden speaks with Nick Pyenson, a paleontologist with the Smithsonian, who helped remove the fossils.

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The Web At 25: Hugely Popular, And Viewed As A Positive Force

Thursday, February 27, 2014

A quarter-century already? It seems just like yesterday. A new Pew survey looks back on how much the World Wide Web's popularity — and role in our lives — have grown since its birth in 1989.

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More Hints That Dad's Age At Conception Helps Shape A Child's Brain

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

A study that took many other potential influences into account found that kids born to men 45 and older were more likely than the children of younger fathers to develop autism or ADHD.

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Morning Edition

Why We Miss Creative Ideas That Are Right Under Our Noses

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

In crowdsourcing, a big challenge is not with coming up with creative ideas, but identifying creative ideas. A bias makes us bad at spotting creative ideas when they come from those working around us.

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