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A $1 Microscope Folds From Paper With A Drop Of Glue

Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Engineers at Stanford University have designed a microscope that fits in your pocket and costs less than a dollar to make. Here's the best part: You put the microscope together yourself.

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Morning Edition

Tennis Trend? Many Top Players Are Older Than 30

Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Over the last decade, the average age of the top 100 tennis players has steadily increased. We look at why players over 30 are likely to be strongly represented in the upcoming U.S. Open.

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More Evidence That ADHD Drugs Don't Curb Ultimate Height

Monday, September 01, 2014

Some earlier research hinted that Ritalin and Adderall can hamper a child's growth. But a study of adults who took the drugs as kids now suggests any such effect is only temporary.

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Study Finds Nothing Special About Breakfast

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Maybe we don't need to eat our Wheaties. Linda Wertheimer talks to Emily Dhurandhar, lead author of a study that finds breakfast may not be the most important meal of the day.

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Scientists Study How We Evolved To Stand On Our Own Two Fins

Thursday, August 28, 2014

They examined an African fish that can breathe air and walk on its fins, discovering insights into the transition from sea to land some 400 million years ago.

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Morning Edition

Ebola Is Rapidly Mutating As It Spreads Across West Africa

Thursday, August 28, 2014

For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.

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Morning Edition

An Icy Solution To The Mystery Of The Slithering Stones

Thursday, August 28, 2014

In the moonscape of Death Valley, one mystery stands out: boulders that seem to creep along the desert floor when nobody's looking. Thanks to video and GPS, scientists now think they know why.

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All Things Considered

There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Peaks around Glacier National Park store water that irrigates a large section of North America. But a warming climate is shrinking that snowpack, with ominous consequences for wildlife and people.

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Science Crowns Mozzarella The King Of Pizza Cheese

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Why do some cheeses melt and caramelize better than others? Researchers used high-tech cameras and special software to figure it out.

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Morning Edition

Pew Study: Facebook, Twitter Users Held Back Views On Snowden

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

The Pew Research Center report shows that Americans were more willing to have a conversation about NSA leaker Edward Snowden face-to-face than in discussion groups on Facebook or Twitter.

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Morning Edition

Parking Behavior May Reflect Economic Drive

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Scholars have long tried to understand how culture affects communities. New research argues that the parking behavior of drivers may tell us something about the economic productivity of nations.

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Depressed Teens May Need Extra Support To Stick With Treatment

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Enlisting parents to make sure teens get counseling is a start, but a lot of families need more support, research suggests. Even finding the right therapist can be daunting.

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All Things Considered

Could A 2-Year-Old Boy Be 'Patient Zero' For The Ebola Outbreak?

Monday, August 25, 2014

Scientists now think the entire outbreak in West Africa was triggered by one person and then the virus took off from there. Early signs pointed to a little boy in southern Guinea.

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Drug Offers Hope For Those With Alopecia Areata

Sunday, August 24, 2014

For millions of people, the condition, which causes hair loss, leads to shame and mental anguish. NPR's Linda Wertheimer talks to Dr. Raphael Clynes about a possible cure.

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New Camouflage Material Is A Color-Change Artist

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Researchers say they've produced octopus-inspired materials that can sense color and change accordingly. NPR's Scott Simon talks to John Rogers, professor of engineering at the University of Illinois.

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Antarctic Lakes, Rivers, Wetlands — All Under A Kilometer Of Ice

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Biologists have discovered what may be the largest unexplored ecosystem on earth, and it's all hidden under the Antarctic ice sheet. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the lead scientist, Brent Christner.

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An Unstoppable Killer: New Research Suggests Cancer Can't Be Eradicated

Thursday, August 21, 2014

A new study finds cancer affects even simple, ancient multicellular organisms — which means the disease and the deaths it causes may simply be a part of life.

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Morning Edition

Why Civil Resistance Movements Succeed

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Steve Inskeep talks to Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan about why non-violent resistance campaigns work better than armed rebellion. Their article on the subject is in Foreign Affairs magazine.

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What Kids' Drawings Say About Their Future Thinking Skills

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

There's a link between how children draw at age 4 and how well they perform on intelligence tests at age 14, researchers say.

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All Things Considered

Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?

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