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From Brain To Computer: Helping 'Locked-In' Patient Get His Thoughts Out

Sunday, October 26, 2014

"When I first saw him he had a little bit of eye movement and that was really the only way he could communicate," says Eric Sellers, who helped a patient use a brain-computer interface to communicate.

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Ebola Vaccine Tester Feels A 'Real Satisfaction'

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Peter Hubbard is one of 20 volunteers in a human safety test of an experimental Ebola vaccine. He tells NPR's Scott Simon about why he signed up and how he has been feeling.

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Curiosity: It Helps Us Learn, But Why?

Friday, October 24, 2014

New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help us better understand and retain information.

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VIDEO: Talking While Female

Friday, October 24, 2014

For starters: Your voice is too squeaky, too loud; it lacks authority, is grating or obnoxious or unprofessional. Why is talking while female such an offense?

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Why California's Drought-Stressed Fruit May Be Better For You

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Is California's severe drought hurting the nutrient content of fruit? No, preliminary data on pomegranates suggest. The fruit may be smaller, but packed with more antioxidants, tests show.

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Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Frustrated scientists argued Wednesday that making nasty viruses even worse in the lab provides crucial insight into preventing pandemics. Others say it just ups the risk a lab germ will start one.

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All Things Considered

Bigger Than A T. Rex, With A Duck's Bill, Huge Arms And A Hump

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Scientists first figured the claw-tipped, giant arm bones found in 1965 belonged to an ostrichlike dinosaur. But its recently recovered skull looks more like a dino designed by a committee — of kids.

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All Things Considered

Sunken U-Boats Off North Carolina Coast A Significant Find For Historians

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

The North Carolina coast may be the last place you'd think to find a sunken German submarine from World War II. But that's what Joe Hoyt — a nautical archeologist — found on a recent expedition to the ocean floor. Robert Siegel talks to him about the underwater battle site there.

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Morning Edition

A 45,000-Year-Old Leg Bone Reveals The Oldest Human Genome Yet

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

The DNA in this ancient Siberian leg bone shows that the man had Neanderthal ancestors — yet more proof that humans and Neanderthals interbred. And he lived much farther north than expected.

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Morning Edition

Banned Drugs Still Turning Up In Weight-Loss Supplements

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Just because the Food and Drug Administration recalls a supplement because it contains dangerous substances doesn't mean the product disappears from the market.

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All Things Considered

Ebola Vaccine Could Start Testing In Africa By January

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

The World Health Organization says two vaccine candidates now undergoing small-scale tests of dosage and safety in people might be ready for broader deployment in Africa by early 2015.

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U.S. To Temporarily Halt Funding For Controversial Virus Research

Friday, October 17, 2014

The federal government will suspend funding while it reviews the potential risks and benefits of certain experiments with three viruses: SARS, MERS and influenza.

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All Things Considered

Study Finds Human Stem Cells May Help To Treat Patients

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

For the first time, scientists are reporting that human embryonic stem cells may be helping treat patients — in one instance, the cells seem to been enabling some blind people to see better.

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Morning Edition

Embryonic Stem Cells Restore Vision In Preliminary Human Test

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Cells derived from embryos appear to have improved vision in more than half of the 18 patients who had become legally blind because of two progressive, currently incurable eye diseases.

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Morning Edition

ProPublica Analyzes 3 Decades Of Deadly Police Shootings

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Analysis shows young black males are at a higher risk of being shot dead by police than younger white males. Rachel Martin talks to Ryan Gabrielson, one of the lead reporters on ProPublica's story.

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Morning Edition

French Economist Wins Nobel For Market Power And Regulation Research

Monday, October 13, 2014

French economist Jean Tirole, 61, works at the Toulouse School of Economics in France. The economics prize completed the 2014 Nobel Prize announcements.

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Morning Edition

Speculation Abounds Over Who Will Win Economics Nobel

Monday, October 13, 2014

The top contenders for the Nobel Prize in economics are said to be a pair of NYU professors who study entrepreneurship, and a Stanford researcher who did pioneering work into economic sociology.

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Morning Edition

In Hopes Of Fixing Faulty Genes, One Scientist Starts With The Basics

Monday, October 13, 2014

Jennifer Doudna used to worry that her science wasn't doing anything important. Then some basic research led her team to a discovery that could one day be crucial in healing some genetic diseases.

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Morning Edition

What's In A Name? It Could Matter If You're Writing To Your Lawmaker

Monday, October 13, 2014

To test subtle biases, researchers sent state legislators identical emails about voting requirements. Some emails came from a man with a "Latino" name, and others from an "Anglo" name.

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Slippery When Coated: Helping Medical Devices Prevent Blood Clots

Sunday, October 12, 2014

When blood flows over an artificial surface, whether it's an implanted pacemaker or tubing for a dialysis machine, there's an increased risk that a dangerous clot will form.

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