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The Takeaway

The Debate about the Health Care Debate

Thursday, February 25, 2010

President Obama's bipartisan health care summit begins later this morning, but the bickering started weeks ago. Arguments between Republicans and Democrats over what kind of table will be used, the seating arrangements, the frequency of coffee breaks and other minutiae are starting to take center stage even before the conversation about whether or how to reform health care.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Fallout from Afghan Civilian Deaths, Toyota Hearings, Health Care Summit

Monday, February 22, 2010

Our weekly look ahead at the news for the next seven days with Marcus Mabry, international business editor for The New York Times, and Jonathan Marcus from the BBC. This week: the fallout from a NATO air strike that killed a number of Afghan civilians; what's in store for Toyota executives as they face a grilling from U.S. lawmakers; and how Republicans are preparing to face President Obama at his health care summit.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Harry Reid's Jobs Bill, Bode Miller Wins Gold, Listeners' Top Sports Movie for Sports-Haters

Monday, February 22, 2010

  • WASHINGTON TAKEOUT: An update from Time Magazine Washington correspondent Jay Newton-Small on legislation President Obama just introduced that would crack down on insurance companies. It's the first time the president has introduced legislation in the health care debate.
  • OLYMPICS TAKEOUT: From Vancouver, New York Times reporter, Jason Stallman recaps the Olympics weekend, including the U.S.- Canada hockey team and Bode Miller's gold performance in the super combined.
  • LISTENER RESPONSE: All weekend our listeners called in with their nominations for the top sports movies for people who hate sports. We hear some of your favorites.

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The Takeaway

Republicans Prepare for White House Health Care Meeting

Tuesday, February 09, 2010

President Obama has called for a health care summit at the White House, where republicans can offer up their own ideas on how to reduce costs, and the two parties can try again to find some common ground.

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The Takeaway

Ron Paul on the Tea Party Convention

Friday, February 05, 2010

Right now the center of attention for politically frustrated conservatives is Nashville, Tenn., as the Tea Party Convention rolls on to day two. But back in 2008, the Ron Paul for President campaign was the magnet of libertarians who felt left out of their party. We ask the Texas Congressman what he thinks of the Tea Parties, and what future he sees for them. 

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The Takeaway

How to End Political Gridlock on Capitol Hill

Friday, February 05, 2010

"Gridlock" is a term that went from engineering jargon to everyday lingo during a transit strike in 1980. Now it's used more to describe the situation on Capitol Hill, with partisan rancor holding up major legislation. We find out how stuck Congress really is and look at new ways to break the deadlock.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Taliban Leader Reported Dead, Bonus Time at Goldman Sachs, Super Bowl Kickers

Thursday, February 04, 2010

  • TALIBAN TAKEOUT: A senior intelligence official told the Associated Press that the U.S. believes Pakistani Taliban leader Hakimullah Mehsud died following a missile attack last month. We find out more from BBC correspondent Mark Dummetin Islamabad, Pakistan.
  • MONEY TAKEOUT: New York Times business reporter Louise Story says speculation abounds over what kind of bonus Goldman Sach's CEO Lloyd Blankfein might award himself.
  • SPORTS TAKEOUT: Sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin, talks about the two kickers heading into the Super Bowl. This is a position that can make the difference between a Super Bowl champion or a complete afterthought.

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The Takeaway

Leonard Pitts on America's Reaction to Haiti

Wednesday, February 03, 2010

Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Leonard Pitts of The Miami Herald looks at ideological divides in the U.S., responses to the earthquake in Haiti, and the way the nation talks about race.

 

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The Takeaway

Eric Cantor: State of the Union Words Not Actions

Thursday, January 28, 2010

President Obama delivered his State of the Union Wednesday night in the midst of his job approval rating being the most polarized of any first-year president. According to a recent Gallup Poll, there is a 65 percentage point gab between Democrats and Republicans. We turn to House Minority Whip Rep. Eric Cantor (R-VA) for a Republican's take on President Obama's speech.

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The Takeaway

Your State of the Union

Monday, January 25, 2010

The president delivers his first State of the Union address this week. We're asking listeners, guests and readers to give us their own impressions: Describe the State of the Union in six words or less.

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The Takeaway

In Washington: The F Word Everyone Says

Friday, January 22, 2010

This week in Washington has been all about the F word you can say on the air: 'Filibuster.'

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The Takeaway

What History Teaches Us About the Supermajority

Thursday, January 21, 2010

The election of Republican Scott Brown as Massachusetts' new junior senator on Tuesday night sent shock waves through Washington. Politicians of on both sides of the aisle flocked to microphones to give their takes on the future of health care reform now that the Democrats no longer have the Senate 60 votes needed to avoid a filibuster. But how did we come to expect a 59-vote majority as a bad thing? We look at the history of the supermajority.

 

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The Takeaway

Courting the Independent Voter

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Republican Scott Brown's victory in Tuesday's Massachusetts Senate race proved the power of independent voters, and the degree to which they are shifting away from the Democratic party, only a year after they helped propel Barack Obama into the presidency. We speak with Jay Campbell, a vice president at Hart Research, and with Ross Baker, professor of political science at Rutgers University.

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The Takeaway

Brown Wins Mass. Senate Race, Gives GOP 41st Seat

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Republican Scott Brown has won the late Ted Kennedy’s former Senate seat after a heated battle in Massachusetts. Brown handily defeated Democratic candidate Martha Coakley. The win for Brown is a major defeat for Democrats, who can no longer muster 60 votes to overcome frequent Republican filibusters in the Senate.

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The Takeaway

Dems Eye Midterms without Dodd and Dorgan

Thursday, January 07, 2010

The Democratic Party found out this week that two of its stars will be setting: Senators Christopher Dodd from Connecticut and Byron Dorgan of North Dakota – who’ve served a combined 46 years in the Senate. Both announced they will not seek reelection in 2010.

Colorado Governor Bill Ritter followed their lead and also announced yesterday he’s ending his bid to keep his seat. These retirements come on top of a string of party defections and seem to weaken the Democrats... With us this morning to look at the political landscape and history, as well as what’s at stake for both Democrats and Republicans, is Jeff Zeleny from The New York Times.  We're also joined by Ron Kaufman, former White House political director; Republican National Committeeman for Massachusetts, and a close friend and advisor to Mitt Romney. Kaufman talks about what Republicans' strategy should be for the 2010 midterm elections.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Economic Exits, Aisle-Jumping Pol, Serena Williams

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

  • Finance Takeout: So far, the federal government and banks have done swift work disentangling public and private interests, following the massive economic rescue effort launched last year. But Newsweek columnist Dan Gross says the Fed's hardest work is just around the corner. Gross says raising interest rates and cutting ties to the housing market are tough but necessary moves to truly get back to business as usual.
  • Politics Takeout: Time Magazine's Jay Newton Small reports on Alabama Rep. Parker Griffith's defection from the Democratic party to the Republican side of the aisle. 
  • Sports Takeout: Our own Ibrahim Abdul-Matin with his second of top ten sports moments of the year: Serena Williams.

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The Takeaway

Newt Gingrich On the President's Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 2009

The mastermind of 1994's "Republican Revolution," former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, has never been shy with his opinion. He joins us this morning giving his read on President Obama's accepting the Nobel Peace Prize.

"I thought the speech was actually very good. And he clearly understood that he had been given the prize prematurely, but he used it as an occasion to remind people, first of all, as he said: that there is evil in the world. I think having a liberal president who goes to Oslo on behalf of a peace prize and reminds the committee that they would not be free, they wouldn't be able to have a peace prize, without having force... I thought in some ways it's a very historic speech. And the President, I think, did a very good job of representing the role of America which has been that of – at the risk of lives of young Americans – creating the fabric of security within which you could have a Martin Luther King Jr. or you could have a Mahatma Gandhi."
— Newt Gingrich, former House Speaker, on President Obama's acceptance speech before the Nobel Committee

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The Takeaway

Ex-Governors Choosing Celebrity Over Politics?

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Have former governors Sarah Palin and Mike Huckabee chosen to forgo politics in order to cultivate their celebrity status? That's the view of our guest, New York Times columnist Ross Douthat, who writes in an op-ed this week that both candidates chose to cash in on their celebrity following the 2008 elections, instead of working towards wider policy and governing experience. We also speak with Cindy Gallop, an advertising consultant and former chair of the advertising agency BBH.

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The Takeaway

Women, Republicans and Sarah Palin

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

As Sarah Palin chats with Oprah and releases her new book, "Going Rogue," we take a look at the role of women in the GOP and Palin's political future. Why are there relatively few Republican women currently in Congress? Is the party inadvertently losing women because it's shifting to a more conservative position? And will Palin run for office again? Former New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman and Republican strategist Mary Matalin weigh in.

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The Takeaway

Rep. Eric Cantor on GOP Health Care Plan

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives aren't satisfied with the health care reform bill drafted by the Democrats, so they have written a health care bill of their own. There are significant aspects of the Republican bill that aren't yet clear, chief among them how much the plan would cost. An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office said the GOP plan would insure only 3 million of those currently without health insurance. By comparison, the Democratic plan would insure 36 million currently uninsured Americans. (Both estimates look ahead to the year 2019.) While the Democrats' bill would cover 96 percent of eligible Americans, the Republican alternative would cover 83 percent — roughly comparable to current levels. House Minority Whip Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) joins us with a look inside the Republican bill and his take on the nation's priorities for health care reform. (Click through for a full interview transcript.)

Join us tomorrow when Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.), the House Majority Whip, talks with us about the Democrats' health care reform ideas.

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