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Regulations

If Walls Could Talk: What Lead Is Doing To Our Students

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

A new study says Massachusetts' aggressive effort to lower lead exposure has also improved student performance.

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Transportation Nation

D.C. Taxi Drivers Deliver Letter To Mayor Gray Calling For Halt To Impoundments

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

WAMU

Cabbies rallied outside D.C.'s city hall Tuesday, demanding a meeting with Mayor Vincent Gray as they fight for more representation on the city's Taxicab Commission.

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Transportation Nation

D.C. Taxi Regulators Vs. Uber — Again!

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

WAMU

In Washington, D.C. Uber livery cabs have been a separate category from regular, metered taxi cabs. That has changed. And it is sparking a new round of regulatory showdowns

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Transportation Nation

D.C. Cab Drivers Say They Can't Add Credit Card Readers By City Deadline

Thursday, August 08, 2013

WAMU

As the deadline to apply for a 30-day extension looms, some Washington taxi drivers are petitioning the D.C. Taxicab Commission for more time to install credit card readers in their vehicles.

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Transportation Nation

D.C. Unveils Plans to Reduce Mandatory Parking Minimums

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

WAMU

District officials say it's a good compromise between car owners and the city's goal to be less car dependent. The plan: where transit is readily available, developers should construct 50 percent less parking.

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Transportation Nation

FTC to D.C. Taxicab Commission: Avoid "Unwarranted Regulatory Restrictions"

Thursday, June 13, 2013

WAMU

Tech companies are complaining. A D.C. Council member is urging restraint. And now the Federal Trade Commission is asking the D.C. Taxicab Commission to be careful when it comes to weighing new regulations for app-based hailing services reshaping Washington's vehicle-for-hire industry.

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Transportation Nation

D.C. Taxicab Commission Considering "Burdensome" Regulations, Says Council Member

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

WAMU

The D.C. Taxicab Commission is considering adopting “burdensome” regulations that would “discourage new, innovative technology companies from operating in the District,” according to a D.C. council member.

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WNYC News

City Council Introduces Legislation to Better Prepare City for Storms

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

The New York City Council announced a package of legislation on Tuesday that seeks to improve the city’s infrastructure in the aftermath of Sandy, as well as better prepare the city for future storms.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Table Saws and Preventing Injuries

Monday, January 23, 2012

In 1999, woodworker Steve Gass invented a device that makes it nearly impossible to be seriously injured by a table saw. His invention would prevent some 32,000 serious injuries—including 4,000 finger amputations—per year, but power tool companies resisted the change. Steve Gass and our resident safety expert, Monona Rossol, talk about why it's taken so long to have this and other safety devices accepted into everyday use.

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It's A Free Country ®

The Process Is Political: Occupy Taking It to Obama

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Occupy Wall Street will protest a high-dollar Obama fundraiser in Manhattan this week. A look at retirement and redistricting: Rep. Barney Frank in 2011 and Rep. Tom DeLay in 2006. And while Republicans campaign on Obama's "job-killing regulations," NPR stops to look at exactly how a White House office has been treating regulations, and finds Obama's doing more tweaking than Bush did. 

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The Takeaway

Pediatrics Group Wants Stronger Chemical Restrictions

Monday, April 25, 2011

The American Academy of Pediatrics says that chemical-management policies have to be revised to better protect children, pregnant women, and the elderly. Dr. Jerome Paulson is the incoming chair of the Council on Environmental Health for the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the lead author of new guidelines issued today.

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Transportation Nation

DOT Forces Airlines to Disclose Fees, Add Other Passenger Protections

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

(Alex Goldmark, Transportation Nation) The U.S. Department of Transportation announced tougher rules designed to protect airline passengers today. The new requirements deal with baggage fees, tarmac wait times and compensation for travelers bumped from flights.

Most of the rule changes announced have to do with fees and costs to passengers. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said airlines will be required to reimburse passengers for baggage fees if a bag is lost, though not if it is late."People get so upset and mad that their bag didn't make it, and then they find out that they're not even going to be reimbursed? It's ridiculous," LaHood told NPR.

Airlines will also be required to "prominently disclose all potential fees" on their websites. That includes baggage fees, but also meal costs, seat upgrade fees as well as government taxes and surcharges. Currently government fees aren't required to be included in the posted price of an airline ticket. Additionally, the compensation for passengers who are involuntarily bumped from flights is being doubled.

“Airline passengers have a right to be treated fairly,” said Secretary LaHood in a statement. “It’s just common sense that if an airline loses your bag or you get bumped from a flight because it was oversold, you should be reimbursed.

LaHood also told NPR the DOT was enshrining these policies in regulation because the industry was not doing it on their own. "Competition has not taken care of these problems. We would not be addressing them if competition had done that," LaHood said.

Another new rule annouced today expands the ban on legnthy tarmac delays. Airlines can be fined as much as $27,500 per passenger if a plane stays on the tarmac more than four hours. That 2009 rule nearly eliminated the dreaded experience of being stranded for hours trapped in a grounded plane. From May 2009 to February 2010 that happened 664 times, a year later, after the rule took effect, during the same period there were just 16 incidents.

Right now, only domestic airlines are required comply, but the new rule extends the fines to international carriers as well. The DOT says it is taking this action, in part, because of an incident at New York's JFK airport during a blizzard last winter when an international carrier held passengers for 11 hours.

Carriers must also provide water and access to working bathrooms after two hours.

Listen to the NPR report here. See the full announcement at the DOT website.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

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WNYC News

Parking Regulations Have Yet to Go Into Effect This Year

Tuesday, January 04, 2011

Yes, the NYC Department of Transportation has suspended alternate side parking through Saturday.

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The Takeaway

Who's to Blame For America's Egg Contamination?

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Half a billion eggs suspected of carrying salmonella have been recalled in what’s become the largest egg recall in U.S. history. And many people are wondering: How did this happen? Is it the fault of the factory farming industry? Or the government? And what can be done to prevent widespread food contamination from happening in the future?

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    The Takeaway

    Oil Companies and Coastal Residents Lawyer Up in Response to Deepwater Horizon Spill

    Tuesday, May 18, 2010

    To date, at least 88 lawsuits have been filed seeking compensation from the April 21st oil rig disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. The rig explosion killed 11 oil workers and the subsequent oil gusher poses a serious threat to the economy and ecology of the entire coastal region.

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    The Takeaway

    Oil Execs' Play Blame Game on Capitol Hill

    Wednesday, May 12, 2010

    Top executives from BP, Transocean and Halliburton – the three companies involved in the massive oil spill that continues to spew in the Gulf Coast – testified on Capitol Hill yesterday, pointing fingers at each other and deflecting blame from their own firms.

    Senators were clearly not amused by all the blame game in full swing. "There's this transference of liability, or finger pointing," Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said. "There's going to be plenty of time to figure out who is to blame, who is at fault.”

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    The Takeaway

    Finance Regulation Reform 101: Sen. Chris Dodd's Bill Goes to the Senate

    Monday, April 26, 2010

    The Senate is scheduled to vote today on whether to begin work on the finance regulatory overhaul bill, which President Obama promoted in New York last week. If Democrats have their way, the Senate will proceed to a debate on the bill, which is sponsored by Sen. Chris Dodd. Otherwise, the bill, S.3217, will stall and require more negotiations.

     

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    The Takeaway

    Takeouts: Banking Regulation, NFL Match-ups

    Friday, January 22, 2010

    • MONEY TAKEOUT:  New York Times finance reporter Louise Story parses President Obama's newest proposal to regulate U.S. banks.
    • SPORTS TAKEOUT: Takeaway Sports Contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin previews the big match-ups this weekend as the Saints, Vikings, Jets and Colts battle for a spot in the Superbowl.

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    The Takeaway

    Takeouts: Congress Spends, Financial Reform, Tiger Woods

    Tuesday, December 01, 2009

    • Washington Takeout: Todd Zwillich tells us that for the first time in history, a disclosure on the amount of money that Congress spends on itself is available online. Todd took a look at some of the nearly 3,400 pages that cover the quarter from July 1 to Sept. 30, 2009.
    • Business Takeout: Louise Story, finance reporter for our partner The New York Times, takes a look at Congress' stalled efforts to pass financial regulatory reform.
    • Sports Takeout: Takeaway Sports Contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin discusses the latest developments in golf champion Tiger Woods' strange and eventful Thanksgiving weekend.

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    The Takeaway

    Sen. Dodd's Proposed Bank Regulations

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009

    The financial reform bill introduced Tuesday by Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.), chair of the Senate Banking Committee, would dramatically change the way U.S. banks are monitored. But with resistance from both Republicans and Democrats, the bill is unlikely to pass through the Senate before the end of the year. Here to tell us more about it is our Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich, along with John Cassidy, New Yorker staff writer and author of the book, "How Markets Fail: The Logic of Economic Calamities."

     

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