Streams

 

Reform

On Being

Reza Aslan — Islam's Reformation

Thursday, November 20, 2014

In a probing and personal conversation, Reza Aslan opens a refreshing window on religion in the world and Islam in particular. It’s a longer view of history and humanity than news cycles invite — certainly when it comes to the Arab Spring, or to ISIS.

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On Being

[Unedited] Reza Aslan with Krista Tippett

Thursday, November 20, 2014

In a probing and personal conversation, Reza Aslan opens a refreshing window on religion in the world and Islam in particular. It’s a longer view of history and humanity than news cycles invite — certainly when it comes to the Arab Spring, or to ISIS.

Comment

WNYC News

First Day in Newark: Nearly Empty School Buses, Parents Ignoring Assignments

Thursday, September 04, 2014

WNYC
A new reform plan, lots of students traveling to new schools and a small boycott greeted students on the first day of school. 

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The Takeaway

Meet the Man Big Banks Fear the Most

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Benjamin Lawsky, the Superintendent of Financial Services for the State of New York, might just be the man that big banks fear the most. He helped bring a criminal case against France's biggest bank, levying the largest and most substantial fine against a bank in history.

Comments [1]

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Can Renzi break Italian deadlock?

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Can Renzi break Italian deadlock?

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Soundcheck

La Santa Cecilia's Musical "Exhaust Valve"

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

La Santa Cecilia's song “El Hielo” tells the story of three immigrants living in fear of the law enforcement agency, and for the band La Santa Cecilia, it hits close to home. La Santa Cecilia's lead singer La Marisoul (the stage name of Marisol Hernandez) and accordion/requinto player Jose “Pepe” Carlos talk with Soundcheck producer Katie Bishop about how personal the song is for them.

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Schoolbook

Michelle Rhee Documentary Highlights Tenure in DC Schools

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

TV producer John Merrow discusses the documentary “The Education of Michelle Rhee,” about the former chancellor of Washington, D.C. public schools, who is one of the most admired and reviled school reformers in America.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Diane Ravitch on School Performance and Standardized Testing

Friday, August 10, 2012

Diane Ravitch, research professor of education at New York University, author of the "Bridging Differences" blog at Education Week and also author of  The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education, follows up on a discussion about school performance and the frustration some teachers feel about standardized testing.

Comments [25]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Michelle Rhee's Education Reform

Friday, August 10, 2012

Michelle Rhee, former chancellor of the Washington DC school system and now the head of Students First NY, talks about the New York State advocacy group she's founded that's being described as a counter to the teachers' union. 

Comments [34]

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Great expectations for Aung San Suu Kyi and the Obama administration's healthcare bill

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Great expectations for Aung San Suu Kyi and the Obama administration's healthcare bill

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The Takeaway

Day Two: The Supreme Court and Health Care

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Taxes, penalties, and tax penalties. That sums up much of what was discussed at yesterday's Supreme Court hearing on the 2010 health care overhaul bill, also known as the Affordable Care Act. Today's hearing, in which the court will focus on the constitutionality of the health overhaul, promises to be much more exciting. We speak with Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University, and Monica Haymond, a legal assistant originally from California who's been sleeping outside the Supreme Court Building since Friday night, hoping to get into today’s hearing.

Comments [13]

The Takeaway

Do Public Schools Need Religious Studies?

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Is the recent Pew Poll that showed most Americans couldn’t pass a test about general world religions an argument for religious education in public schools? And if so, what would a Constitutionally acceptable religious curriculum would look? That’s the question we pose to Charles Haynes, Director of the Religious Freedom Education Project at the Newseum in Washington, DC, 

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The Empire

Former Silver Aide Rails Against Albany, 'Career Politicians'

Friday, August 20, 2010

Braunstein and Skala

Braunstein's FaceBook Page

Braunstein works for Albany. Now, he campaigns against it.

Ed Braunstein is a staffer who worked for Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. Now, he’s running for an Assembly seat in Queens by railing against Albany.

“Albany is an embarrassment and career politicians are completely out of touch with our values,” Braunstein's recent mailer says.

He also signed the NY Uprising reform pledge which, his former boss, has not.

Disclaimer: Above is a photo of Braunstein with Bayside activist Frank Skala, who nearly failed me in 7th grade social studies.

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Comments [7]

Azi Paybarah

'A General Without Troops'

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

WNYC

Reader William Bryk has a critical take on why Ed Koch's reform push probably won't yield any results, in Albany or anywhere else. In short, it's ballot access, says Bryk:

If Mayor Koch were truly serious, primaries would be taking place across the City. They're not. With all respect to him, he's a general without troops; he's been retired from politics for over twenty years; he's eighty-five years old this year; he can get some press attention, but he can't effect the kind of change he says he wants to bring about.

The hyper-technical ballot access requirements of the election law are the reason why we don't have the nationwide anti-incumbent surge enriching our local politics. If Mayor Koch would lend his energies and talents to making it easier for ordinary citizens - not just lawyers and professional politicians -- to get on the ballot, he would truly crown his sixty years' service as soldier, lawyer, public official, and public figure.

Timing, I'd say, is also a factor.

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Comments [1]

Azi Paybarah

Timing the Revolt

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

WNYC

Despite the “anti-incumbent” mood supposedly sweeping through the mid-term elections, there are surprisingly few incumbents in New York State facing serious electoral challenges.

Among the most glaring examples are Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Senate Conference Leader John Sampson: They’re Democrats who each lead one half of the often-criticized “dysfunctional” state legislature. They’ve also both refused to sign the reform pledges advanced by the group led by former Mayor Ed Koch, who, in return, branded Silver, Sampson and other hold outs “enemies of reform.”

That seems like enough fodder for a challenger.

So, how did Silver, Sampson and other “enemies” avoid serious primary challenges?

In short: Since the state has no campaign finance mechanism, challengers would have had to start revving up their fund-raising and campaign operations months in advance, well before the anti-incumbent “mood” and fever pitch for reform swelled to it’s current levels.

Or, as Jerry Skurnik, a political consultant (and one-time Koch aide) put it to me, “By the time Koch started doing this stuff, it was too late.”

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Azi Paybarah

Espada Signs Koch's Reform Pledge

Thursday, July 01, 2010

WNYC

State Senator Pedro Espada signed the pledge from Ed Koch’s PAC supporting non-partisan redistricting and other reform measures in Albany.

Koch--continuing with the group’s MO of using public attention to shame others into signing the pledge--said, “if Espada commits to these reforms, surely you must.”

Espada, a Democratic Senator from the Bronx, has been criticized for a number of alleged ethical lapses, including a history of campaign finance filing problems, profiting from a non-profit health care group he controls and throwing the state into chaos when he and another Democratic Senator caucused with Republicans, flipping control of that house and bringing state government to a standstill.

Among the people who have not signed the pledge are Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Assembly Vito Lopez, the Brooklyn Democratic County Leader.

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WQXR News

Bloomberg Coalition Advocates Immigration Reform

Thursday, June 24, 2010

CEOs of several major corporations are joining Mayor Michael Bloomberg in a coalition pushing for changes to immigration policy.

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The Takeaway

Banking Industry Lobbies Against Reform Stipulation

Monday, June 21, 2010

While Congress rushes to complete a sweeping financial reform bill later this week, the banking industry is pulling out all the stops for a last ditch effort to undercut the Volcker Rule—a provision that allows banks to retain some of their most risky businesses. The New York Times' finance reporter Louise Story explains who wins and who loses if the Volcker rule were to be put in place.

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The Takeaway

Capitol Hill Readies for Energy Reform

Monday, June 07, 2010

As energy legislation makes its way to Capitol Hill, lawmakers are beginning to hint at how they'll work together. Sen. John Cornyn said that he is ready to work with Democrats to deal with some of our environmental concerns. However, it is unlikely that senators like Cornyn will accept the president's comprehensive energy and climate change legislation.

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The Takeaway

EPA Orders Less Toxic Chemical Dispersants in Oil Spill Cleanup

Friday, May 21, 2010

The Environmental Protection Agency has given BP 24 hours to find a less toxic chemical dispersant to break up the oil gushing from their ruined pipeline in the Gulf of Mexico. These dispersants are used to break up the crude into droplets that will sink into the water, making them more easily diluted by ocean currents and less likely to threaten shoreline ecoystems or marine life on the surface.

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