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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Cheese and Making Cheese

Friday, March 15, 2013

Sascha Anderson, Director of Education at Murray’s Cheese, and Gianaclis Caldwell, cheesemaker at Pholia Farm and author of Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking, talk about the wide variety of cheeses, how to select cheeses, and how to make cheese.

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Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: Forget Ramps, Try Cardoons Instead

Friday, March 08, 2013

Chef John Fraser says that although cardoons look like “celery with armor,” beneath that bristly exterior, there hides a delicious spring vegetable. Just be sure to snap on a pair of gloves before you start preparing them.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Potato Latkes

Friday, March 08, 2013

Try this classic potato pancakes recipe from Russ & Daughters: Reflections and Recipes from the House that Herring Built, by Mark Russ Federman

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Cheese Blintzes

Friday, March 08, 2013

Make these family favorites from Russ & Daughters: Reflections and Recipes from the House that Herring Built, by Mark Russ Federman.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Bagel Pudding with Prunes and Raisins

Friday, March 08, 2013

A twist on traditional bread pudding, from Russ & Daughters: Reflections and Recipes from the House that Herring Built, by Mark Russ Federman.

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Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: On a Mission to Save Kubbeh

Friday, March 01, 2013

Kubbeh, a traditional Jewish-Iraqi comfort food of semolina dumplings simmered in soup, may be in danger of disappearing because it's so labor-intensive to make. To help make sure that doesn't happen, culinary curator Naama Shefi created The Kubbeh Project, a three-week pop-up restaurant that opens today.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Sriracha

Friday, March 01, 2013

There’s a commercial for hot sauce on TV with the tagline, “I put that #%*& on everything.” That’s how I feel about Sriracha.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Wine Vinegar

Friday, March 01, 2013

Vinegar is just wine that’s been encouraged to go bad. Sure, there are plenty of variables, but do you really need anything more than a little wine and some patience? We say no.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Happy Wild Salmon

Friday, March 01, 2013

This delicious dill-yogurt sauce will make fish-eaters out of anyone (even your kids).

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Raw Brussels Sprouts Salad

Friday, March 01, 2013

You may think this vegetable is way too bitter to eat raw, but you'll be surprised by just how well this simple salad stands up next to your favorite subtle fish or chicken recipes.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Butternut Squash Soup

Friday, March 01, 2013

This is a classic of late summer and early fall, and it's great for freezing to eat all year long.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Whole-Grain Mustard

Friday, March 01, 2013

Mustard has many faces. Sharp or sweet, subtle or super-spicy, there’s a mustard out there to complement any type of food.

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Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: True Grits

Friday, February 22, 2013

The Lee Brothers talk about the resurgence of stone-ground grits and explain why instant grits are so bland. Try a recipe from their new cookbook for shrimp and grits. 

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Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: Go Ahead, Make Ricotta at Home

Friday, February 15, 2013

Chef Peter Berley says that making ricotta at home is both fast and simple. Try his four-ingredient recipe.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Clark Makes Valentine's Day Delicious

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

New York Times Dining Section columnist and cookbook writer Melissa Clark offers romantic and delicious ideas for what to make for Valentine's Day—from oysters to chocolate desserts.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Melissa Clark's Tiny Valentine’s Day Cake for Daniel (Devil’s Food Cake with Brown Butter Rum Crunch Frosting)

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

I acquired my first 6-inch cake pan when I made the wedding cake for two friends in graduate school. It was a casual affair, a quick jaunt to City Hall followed by a reception at someone’s apartment. My job was to make a chocolate, tiered cake with white buttercream, covered in flowers.

At this point in my baking career I’d never quadrupled a cake recipe, never cut dowels to stack cake layers on top of each other, and had never tried to frost anything more ambitious than a birthday cake. 

But I bumbled my way through it, obsessively reading and rereading the assembly instructions in Rose Levy Beranbaum’s The Cake Bible, and making sure to have a lot of extra icing and big bright flowers on hand for disasters. 

Well, let’s just say that first cake was a good lesson in why professionally made cakes cost what they do. Even my ugly duck cake was scarily time consuming, especially because I’d forgotten to mix the baking powder into the first batch of batter I put in the oven. Then, for all my best efforts, the poor cake was lopsided and hunchbacked, its pristine white icing strewn here and there with nubby black crumbs that I couldn’t mask, and covered, willy-nilly, with slightly wilted Gerbara daisies. The maid of honor said it was rustic and homemade-looking, and I know she meant it as a compliment. Luckily, it hardly mattered. The bride and groom stopped at a bar on the way to the reception, and drank so many congratulatory shots that when they finally showed up, they barely noticed the cake, which all the tipsy guests devoured with their hands when we ran out of forks. 

Since then, my friends have divorced and remarried, and I have drastically improved my cake-making skills (and plastic fork buying skills). I’ve made four more wedding cakes (never my own, by the way) and all were lovely and not at all lopsided, if still pleasingly homemade-looking and rustic.

All this to say that those 6-inch cake pans that I bought for a wedding cake back in my student days have gotten good use, and not just for wedding cakes. I also love using them to bake tiny little layer cakes to feed four to six. Or in this Valentine’s Day recipe, two, with ample leftovers for breakfast the next morning.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Melissa Clark's Oysters Rockefeller

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Serves 4

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup diced fennel
Pinch salt
2 cups chopped, loosely packed spinach
1 small leek, white and green parts, chopped
2 tablespoons Pernod
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
12 oysters on the half shell
1 lemon, cut into wedges, for serving

1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.

2. In a medium skillet, heat the olive oil and butter over medium heat. Add the fennel and salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the edges start to turn golden, about 2 minutes. Add the spinach, leek, and salt and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds, until the spinach is wilted. Turn the heat to medium-high, add the Pernod, and cook for 1 minute, until the liquid has bubbled away. Transfer the spinach mixture to a bowl and let come to room temperature.

3. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the Parmesan cheese and the panko.

4. Line a baking sheet with a layer of lightly crumpled foil. Arrange the oysters on the foil, bringing the foil up and around the bottoms of the shells to keep them upright. Top the oysters with the spinach mixture, followed by the cheese mixture.  Bake in the upper third of oven until browned on the tops, about 10–12 minutes.

5. Serve on pretty plates with the lemon wedges on the side.

Comments [1]

Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: Make Hummus Like a Pro

Friday, February 08, 2013

Food writers Melissa Clark and Deb Perelman talk about peeling chickpeas in pursuit of making the best homemade hummus. Try their recipes and tell us which one you like the best.

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Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: Essential Snow Day Snacking

Thursday, February 07, 2013

Check out a few recipes from past Last Chance Foods that will help keep you warm, entertained and well fed during snowstorm Nemo.

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Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: One Rad Radish

Friday, February 01, 2013

Food writer Cathy Erway talks about the versatile uses of daikon radishes, which are still available at farmers markets. Try her recipe for Daikon Radish Greens Pasta with Seared Daikon Radishes.

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