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Randy Mastro

The Christie Tracker Podcast

Presidential Politics, Ethics Reform and Sandy

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Christie may have decided it's better to wait on a campaign announcement, and in the meantime, he's got some Hillary-style email problems of his own.

WNYC News

Cablevision Goes on Offensive as Council Questions Labor Practices

Tuesday, December 02, 2014

One of New York City's biggest cable providers vigorously denies charges of union-busting.

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WNYC News

A Jilted Lover, a 'Crazy' Man and Diane Sawyer: What Christie Crisis Management Looks Like

Thursday, March 27, 2014

WNYC

Here are six takeaways from how the Christie Administration's lawyers unveiled a report from their internal Bridgegate investigation.

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Transportation Nation

New York City's Road to Taxi E-Hail Just Keeps Getting Bumpier

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

An appellate judge has issued a restraining order preventing New York's pilot yellow cab e-hail program from going forward.

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Transportation Nation

Big Names Ready a Lawsuit to Remove Brooklyn Bike Lane

Friday, February 04, 2011

Prospect Park Bike Lane

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation) It’s a who’s who directory of city government. Iris Weinshall, the former city transportation commissioner and wife of U.S. Senator Charles Schumer.    A dean at Brooklyn College.  Norman Steisel, the former deputy mayor under Edward Koch and David Dinkins.   And the other former deputy mayor, Randy Mastro (under Giuliani) who introduced the group to a colleague at his high-powered law firm, Gibson, Dunn, and Crutcher. And what is all this former government firepower being assembled to do?  Remove a bike lane on Prospect Park West, in Brooklyn.

Controversy over the bike lane began even before it was installed, last June.  Though the local community board approved the lane – both to provide a safe haven for commuting cyclists and to slow traffic along Prospect Park West – some residents of the leafy boulevard and their supporters were outraged.  They said the two-way lane – which is separated from automobile traffic by a row of parked cars -- would cause congestion, change the historic character of the avenue, and make pedestrian crossing dangerous and confusing.  To make room for the bike lanes, automobile traffic was constricted from three lanes to two.

Protest Against the Bike Lane in October Photo Erin McCarty/WNYC

Marty Markowitz, the Borough President of Brooklyn, who’s known for trying to put the whole borough on a diet and for brandishing Star Wars lasers at graduations, called the city transportation commissioner, Janette Sadik-Khan, a “zealot” for wanting to install this lane.   But cyclists, and the local community board, remained steadfastly behind it, saying it would improve quality of life for Brooklyn residents, make travel safer, and encourage people to use bikes instead of automobiles.

Last month, the city DOT released its findings.  The lane had cut speeding dramatically. One in five cars now speeds, the city says, compared to the three out of four who used to.   The consequences, the city DOT says – are potentially life-saving.  A pedestrian hit by a car driving 40 mph has an eighty percent chance of dying.  A pedestrian hit by a car driving 30 mph will survive two thirds of the time.  That, the DOT says, is the difference the lane has made.

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