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Ramadan

The Takeaway

Listeners Respond: Ramadan Reflections

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Through 30 days of fasting, from sunrise to sunset, Muslims are encouraged to spend time in prayer and reflection. As Muslims around the world celebrate the end of Ramadanwe bring you these voices of reflection from around the country.

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On Being

Samar Jarrah, Wajahat Ali, Sahar Ullah, Et Al. — Revealing Ramadan [remix]

Thursday, July 17, 2014

16 Muslims, in their own words, speak about the delights and gravity of Islam's holiest month. Through vivid memories and light-hearted musings, they reveal the richness of Ramadan — as a period of intimacy, and of parties; of getting up when the world is

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Five Pillars Week: Pilgrimage Open Phones

Friday, July 19, 2013

It's Five Pillars of Islam week on The Brian Lehrer Show. Every day this week, we're hosting an interfaith conversation based around the Five Pillars: Shahadah (faith), Salat (prayer), Sawm (Ramadan), Zakat (charity) and Hajj (pilgrimage). Today: we open the phones to discuss faith and pilgrimage as part of your religious practice. Call 212-433-9692 or post a comment here

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Five Pillars Week: Charity Open Phones

Thursday, July 18, 2013

It's Five Pillars of Islam week on The Brian Lehrer Show. Every day this week, we're hosting an interfaith conversation based around the Five Pillars: Shahadah (faith), Salat (prayer), Sawm (Ramadan), Zakat (charity) and Hajj (pilgrimage). Today: we open the phones to discuss charity, giving, and service as part of your religious practice. Call 212-433-9692 or post a comment here.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Five Pillars Week: Ramadan Open Phones

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

It's Five Pillars of Islam week on The Brian Lehrer Show. Every day this week, we're hosting an interfaith conversation based around the Five Pillars: Shahadah (faith), Salat (prayer), Sawm (Ramadan), Zakat (charity) and Hajj (pilgrimage). Today: we open the phones to discuss fasting for Ramadan or any other religious practice. Call 212-433-9692 or post a comment here.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Zimmerman Juror B37; Bill de Blasio; Mandela and South Africa Today

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Juror B37 from the Zimmerman trial went public with her experience, and Emily Bazelon from Slate joins us to discuss what the juror revealed about the trial. Then: Public Advocate and one of the democratic nominees for mayor of New York Bill de Blasio. Plus: Nelson Mandela’s life, legacy and South Africa today on the day before his 95th birthday with Ebrahim Rasool, South African ambassador to the U.S. and Nicole Lee, president of TransAfrica; and an hour of open phones, including interfaith calls on fasting in honor of Ramadan as part of this week’s Five Pillars of Islam series. 

The Brian Lehrer Show

Zimmerman Verdict; History of Spam; Five Pillars of Islam

Monday, July 15, 2013

The George Zimmerman "not guilty" verdict continues to reverberate, from the court in Sanford, FL to the streets of NYC. We discuss the decision and what comes next. Bob Cusack of The Hill and Patricia Williams of The Nation help guide the conversation. And, Five Pillars of Islam week on the show; the future of publishing and e-books; and the history of Internet spam.

The Takeaway

Ramadan at Guantanamo Bay

Thursday, July 11, 2013

The Muslim holy month of Ramadan began at sundown on Monday night. And with it, millions of Muslims around the world began abstaining from food and drink during daylight hours, in the hopes of finding spiritual growth. But for the Muslims in Guantanamo Bay who’ve been on hunger strike since the spring and regularly face force-feedings, Ramadan is a far more complicated matter. Carol Rosenberg of The Miami Herald joins The Takeaway to discuss force-feedings during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

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WNYC News

Taking Blame, Anonymous Caller Says Bacon Incident Wasn’t a Hate Crime

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

A newspaper received an anonymous call from a man who claims the bacon found scattered in a Staten Island park where Muslims gathered for Ramadan prayers was not a hate crime. 

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Transportation Nation

12 Hours Behind the Wheel in NYC, With No Food Or Drink

Thursday, August 09, 2012

(photo by Kathleen Horan)

If you're traveling by taxi this summer, chances are your driver is hungrier than usual. Nearly half of licensed drivers in the city are Muslim—and they’re not eating because they’re observing Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and reflection. That means thousands of cabbies are working 12-hour shifts without food, water or caffeine.

Muslims break their daily fast at sundown. One recent evening, the West 29th Street curbside in Manhattan held so many taxis that the street glowed yellow. This commercial district in Manhattan has free evening parking, a boon for drivers.

Around 8 p.m., as the day's light faded, cabbies rushed into a mosque called Masjid Ar-Rhahman. A mountain of their shoes rose in the vestibule. Soon their sung prayers emanated from a loudspeaker at the top of the mosque. Outside, vendors selling prayer books and sweet treats waited patiently for the cabbies to emerge from inside.

Driver Lansana Keita was one of the first ones out. He smiled as he ate his first food of the day, a sweet rice concoction that resembled rice pudding. "You need something soft after fasting all day, to help your metabolism to digest,” he said.

Keita said his biggest obstacle during Ramadan is keeping up his stamina during a shift that typically features mind-numbing traffic, the threat of parking tickets and the never-ending drone of the TV in his backseat. He said driving on an empty stomach while dealing with the daily guff from passengers becomes a spiritual exercise.

"When someone cusses on you, you have to let it go," he said. "When someone wants to have drama with you, you have to let it go--those are the principles of Ramadan.”

Drivers who chose not to eat in the mosque huddled on the sidewalk in small groups to consume their long-awaited meals.

"I love this: it’s called pakora, samosa and chana,” said Mohammed Tipu Sultan, a driver of 10 years, about his Bangladeshi meal. Sultan made the food disappear in a hurry, like anyone would after fasting for 16 hours.

(photo by Kathleen Horan)

Driver Yehya Abdeen was on his way to get his first caffeine fix at a local cafe before resuming his night shift. He said a purpose of Ramadan is to teach patience—a trait city cabbies aren't always known for.

"I try to be nice all the time, but we try to be more nice during Ramadan," he said, before joking, "But it’s hard when you don't take your coffee, you know?"

During Ramadan, Muslims are required to pray more than the usual five times a day. So you may see drivers stopping to kneel in the direction of Mecca on squares of cardboard or small rugs in the back of bodegas and restaurants.

(photo by Kathleen Horan)

Or at JFK airport. At the airport's taxi lot, hundreds of drivers were lined up awaiting a fare to Manhattan. About two dozen drivers made use of a makeshift prayer area, bowing and kneeling next to a pair of public restrooms.

Tely Diallo, a tall driver in a gingham shirt, was about to jump into his cab again. He paused to complain that it’s hard to make enough money when you're pulling over to pray an extra two hours a day.

"You can't really do what you've got to do," he said. "You can't pray on time. I was supposed to be praying a long time ago but I couldn’t because you're always in a rush, you want to get the lease money."

(photo by Kathleen Horan)

Cabbie Mohammed Waheed said it helps that so many other drivers are fasting with him during the holy month. "The fifteen of my friends who are cab drivers—they all fast," he said.

Muslims, including many New York taxi drivers, will be observing Ramadan this year until the weekend of August 18, when the fasting ends and the completion of a month of self-control is celebrated.

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The Takeaway

2012 London Olympics set to Conflict with Ramadan

Friday, July 20, 2012

Bad news for the 3000 Muslim athletes participating in this years summer olympics: The 2012 summer olympics conflict with Ramadan for the first time since 1980. Iman Adam Kelwick, whose mosque is in Liverpool, joins the show to examines this conflict between sport and faith.

 

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The Takeaway

Study Finds Muslim-Americans Are More Satisfied With the U.S.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Coming up, we talk to two Muslim Americans about a recent poll that says Muslim Americans are happier with this country than the rest of the population.

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The Takeaway

Syrian Troops Open Fire on Eid Worshipers

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Reports coming out of Syria this morning claim that security forces opened fire on worshipers at mosques in the southern and central regions of the country after Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of Ramadan. At least seven people are known dead at this time. Amer Al-Sadeq, of the Syrian Revolution Coordinators Union, has the latest update from Damascus.

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WNYC News

Confusion Over the End of Ramadan

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

There is confusion among Muslims across the five boroughs about when to break the month-long Ramadan fast because there is disagreement over how to determine the start of a new lunar month.

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Features

Something Sweet for Eid ul-Fitr

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Muslims begin celebrating Eid ul-Fitr, the end of Ramadan, on Tuesday. Traditionally, that means eating something sweet as soon as you wake up to acknowledge that the month of fasting is over. To commemorate this festive three-day holiday, here's a slideshow of sweet foods to eat during Eid.

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The Takeaway

Ramadan Rules: An Exception for Revolutions?

Monday, August 22, 2011

Last night, during the holy month of Ramadan, Libyan rebel forces flooded into the capital of Tripoli, battling with Col. Moammar Gadhafi loyalists and capturing two of Gadhafi's sons. Civilians were celebrating in the streets over what may be the end of Gadhafi's 42 years in power of Libya. Fighting during the holy month is considered particularly offensive. Are there exceptions for revolutions such as this one?

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The Takeaway

A Ramadan Roadtrip Around The US

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Two men are spending Ramadan in 30 different mosques in 30 different states for all 30 days of the month of fasting. They're traveling 13,000 miles, from Alaska to New York City, and are speaking with us today from South Carolina, where they're a little more than halfway through their trip. What they've found is that generations of American Muslims have lived in small pockets of the U.S. since the 1800s.

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The Takeaway

Government Continues to Crack Down on Protesters in Syria

Monday, August 15, 2011

Syria continued its violent crackdown on protesters this week and increased its escalation using navy vessels to go after the port city of Latakia on Sunday. At least 25 people are reportedly killed including three children, according to our partner The New York Times. Joining us is Anthony Shadid, Beirut bureau chief for The New York Times, whose been covering this story. 

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The Takeaway

Ramadan Continues, Amid Violence in Syria and Egypt

Friday, August 05, 2011

Today is the fifth day of Ramadan — the holiest month on the Islamic calendar during which, typically, life in the Middle East slows down. Businesses close early, and families and communities gather every night to break their fast. But this year has been strikingly different. The Syrian government has used the holy month to intensify its violent crackdown on protesters, with tanks entering the town Hama every day since the weekend. Meanwhile in Egypt, hundreds of armed troops stormed Cairo’s Tahrir Square earlier in the week, beating protesters with electric batons.

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Features

Celebrate Eid ul-Fitr with Food from Around the Muslim World

Thursday, September 09, 2010

Tens of thousands of New York Muslims begin to celebrate Eid ul-Fitr on Friday, the festive celebration marking the end of Ramadan, which is the month of fasting and abstinence from worldly pleasures. The Eid, as it is affectionately called, starts when the new moon is sited or according to scientific calculations of when the moon will appear.

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