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Race And Ethnicity

The Takeaway

Census Data Show a Boom for Minority-Owned Businesses

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Census Data from the years 2002 - 2007 show that the number of minority owned businesses in the US rose by 46 percent during those five years, to about 5.8 million. That's nearly twice the national rate for all businesses during that time.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Race and America's Future

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Angela Glover Blackwell, founder and CEO of PolicyLink, and Manuel Pastor, professor and director of the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity at the University of Southern California, discuss race and American identity. In Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future, they explore race as both a dynamic facet of American identity and a major cause of American disunity.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Promised Land in South Africa

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Yoruba Richen, director of “Promised Land,” talks about her film, an inside look at land reform and racial reconciliation in the new South Africa. It follows the Mekgareng, an impoverished tribe removed from their land 40 years ago that petitioned the government in 1998 to reclaim the land, now owned by white farmers and developers. It also looks at the firestorm ignited in 2006 when the South African government forced a white farmer to give his land back to the descendants of the black owners were removed from it in the 1940s.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Charles Ogletree on Race, Class, and Crime in America

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Charles Ogletree, one of the country’s foremost experts on civil rights, discusses the arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr., MacArthur Fellow and Harvard professor, for attempting to break into his own home last July, and explores issues of race, class, and crime. His book The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America is based on his years of research and his own experiences with law enforcement, and it outlines steps we should take to reach racial and legal equality for all Americans.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Stereotypes Affect Us

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Acclaimed social psychologist Claude Steele describes studies that show that exposing subjects to stereotypes—reminding female math majors about to take a test that women are considered inferior to men at math—impairs their performance. In Whistling Vivaldi: And Other Clues to How Stereotypes Affect Us he sheds new light on a number of American social phenomena, from the racial and gender gaps in standardized test scores to the belief in the superior athletic prowess of black men.

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The Takeaway

Illinois Police Commander Found Guilty of Perjury

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Last month, we spoke with Darell Cannon, one of a number of black men in Chicago who claim they were tortured and coerced into confessions during the 70s and 80s by Chicago Police. For men like Cannon, who spent 24 years in prison after being tortured by former police Lieutenant Jon Burge the men he commanded, justice has finally come.

Former Chicago Police Lieutenant Jon Burge was found guilty yesterday on charges of federal perjury and obstruction of justice. He could now face up to 45 years behind bars, after his sentencing hearing in November. Rob Wildeboer, criminal justice reporter for Chicago Public Radio tells us more about the case and the conviction.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Autobiography of a Recovering Skinhead

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Frank Meeink tells how he was drawn into America’s Nazi underground and how he ultimately triumphed over drugs and hatred. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Vadim Jean’s “In the Land of the Free”

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Vadim Jean, director of "In the Land of the Free," along with Robert King , discuss the Angola 3—Herman Wallace, Albert Woodfox and Robert King—who’ve spent a combined century in solitary confinement in Angola, the Louisiana State Penitentiary.

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The Takeaway

How Race Affects a Jury: Latest in BART Shooting Case Surprises Activists

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Jury selection is complete in the murder case against former BART police officer Johannes Mehserle against an unarmed passenger, Oscar Grant, on New Year's Day 2009; but, while the case is moving forward, many activists are concerned about the jury's racial make-up. The shooter is white and the victim is black.

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The Takeaway

In Curtis Flowers Murder Case, Can Justice Be Served?

Tuesday, June 08, 2010

In 1996, Curtis Flowers, a 39 year-old African American, was accused of murdering four people in Mississippi. He now prepares to go to trial for a sixth time. The previous court appearances resulted in two mistrials and three overturned convictions. The stark racial divide in the small Mississippi community of Winona is making it nearly impossible to build a jury of Flowers’ peers, says Charlie Smith, news editor at The Greenwood Commonwealth, who has been following the trial.

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The Takeaway

Rand Paul Stirs Trouble with Comments on Civil Rights

Monday, May 24, 2010

Dr. Rand Paul, the anti-establishment candidate in Kentucky's Republican Senate primary, put the Tea Party on the political map last week as he handily beat GOP-blessed candidate Trey Grayson. But in the first few days after his victory, the novice politician stumbled on his first big political test as he repeatedly said that he did not support the portion of the 1964 Civil Rights Act that enforced non-discrimination on private businesses.

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The Takeaway

Illinois Police Commander Faces Trial for Torture

Monday, May 24, 2010

After decades of claims by black men in Chicago that they were tortured and coerced into confessions during the '70s and '80s, former police commander Jon Burge now faces trial in federal court on obstruction of justice and perjury charges.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Walk in My Shoes

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Andrew Young, a top aide to Martin Luther King, Jr. and one of history's most important civil rights leaders, was at Dr. King's side when he was assassinated. Young and his godson Kabir Sehgal talk about how two generations view civil rights, race, faith, love, and leadership.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Losing My Cool

Monday, May 17, 2010

Thomas Chatterton Williams gives an account of being drawn in to hip-hop culture and how his father drew him out again. 

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Selected Shorts

Writing at the MacDowell Colony

Sunday, May 16, 2010

Two rich tales reflect aspects of the immigrant experience, both experienced and inherited, in stories by MacDowell Colony writers.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Girl Who Fell from the Sky

Friday, May 14, 2010

Heidi Durrow discusses her debut novel, The Girl Who Fell from the Sky.

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The Takeaway

Arizona Passes Law to Cut Ethnic Studies Programs

Thursday, May 13, 2010

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed a bill on Tuesday that will effectively eliminate a particular school district's ethnic studies program. The bill specifically targets Tucson school district's Mexican-American studies program. That district superintendent, Tom Horne, has pushed the bill for years and says he believes ethnic studies programs promote hate and teach Latino kids to believe they were oppressed by white people. This new law makes headlines just weeks after Gov. Brewer put her signature to one of the most controversial immigration bills in the country.

Do you think there's a place for ethnic studies in U.S. history classes?»

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Decisive Actions

Wednesday, May 05, 2010

Director Tom Casciato and New York Times urban affairs correspondent Sam Roberts talk about the controversial legacy of New York Mayor John Lindsay. Then, Wes Moore, a former Rhodes scholar who discovered someone with the same name and who grew up in the same town, but whose life turned out ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Private and Public Lives

Tuesday, May 04, 2010

On today’s show, former first lady Rosalynn Carter discusses her advocacy for the mentally ill. Then, Pam Grier talks about her life, career, and her with many memorable roles, like Jackie Brown. Also, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jane Smiley on her latest, called Private Life. Humorist Dave Barry tells terrifying tales ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Foxy Pam Grier

Tuesday, May 04, 2010

Pam Grier, best known for her roles as Foxy Brown, Friday Foster, Coffy, and Jackie Brown, talks about her life and career. In her memoir Foxy: My Life in Three Acts, she discusses her relationships with famous men like Richard Pryor, her experiences as a backup singer and a blaxploitation ...

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