Streams

 

Race And Ethnicity

The Leonard Lopate Show

Freedom Riders

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

From May to December 1961, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives by traveling together through the Deep South, deliberately violating Jim Crow laws. These Freedom Riders’ beliefs in non-violent activism was tested as violence and racism greeted them. Dr. Bernard LaFayette Jr., cofounder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and participant in the Freedom Rides, and Gerald Stern, who was a young civil rights lawyer in the Justice Department at the time, discuss the Freedom Riders actions and the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and look at the legacy of the movement today.

In 2011, PBS released Stanley Nelson’s American Experience documentary film Freedom Riders.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

One Family’s Quest to Buy Black in America’s Racially Divided Economy

Monday, February 27, 2012

Maggie Anderson talks about her family’s yearlong experiment to buy only from black-owned businesses, a decision she made because she says most African Americans live in economically starved neighborhoods, black wealth is about one tenth of white wealth, and black businesses lag behind businesses of all other racial groups in every measure of success. In Our Black Year: One Family’s Quest to Buy Black in America’s Racially Divided Economy, she draws on economic research and social history as well as her personal story.

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

Ken Salazar Wants More Landmarks for Minorities

Monday, February 27, 2012

There are thousands of national landmarks in the United States. But less than 3 percent of them are dedicated to members of minority groups, such as Latinos and women. Ken Salazar, Secretary of the Interior and former senator from Colorado, believes more monuments should be created to honor the nation's diversity of heroes. Ken Salazar explains what the department does and how it can be instrumental in being the custodian of America's history.

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

A New Legal Challenge to Affirmative Action

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Abigail Fisher, a white student from Sugarland, Texas, sued the University of Texas after she failed to receive admission. In "Fisher v. Texas," she claims she was turned down even though her application was just as strong as minority students who got in. Sometime in the fall, this case will be heard by the Supreme Court, the first affirmative action case heard in nearly a decade. With more conservative justices on the bench, the case could overturn the 2003 ruling that allows universities to take race into account during admissions as long as they didn't quantify their process.

Comment

The Takeaway

Does Race Play a Role in the Media Fascination with Jeremy Lin?

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Over the past two weeks, the "Linsanity" of New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin has swept across New York, and much of America. Breaking records for scoring and assisting in his first five games, many sports fans are celebrating. Meanwhile, many are wondering when was the last time a black athlete ignited the same type of passion.

Comments [18]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Loving Story

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Nancy Buirski, director of the documentary “The Loving Story,” recounts the love story of Mildred and Richard Loving, an interracial couple whose marriage was declared illegal in 1958 until they successfully fought their case in front of the Supreme Court, resulting in the landmark 1967 Civil Rights decision ending marriage discrimination based on race. “The Loving Story” premieres on HBO on February 14, at 9 pm.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jamal Jospeph on His Life of Rebellion and Reinvention

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

Jamal Jospeph tells the story of his personal odyssey from the streets of Harlem to Riker’s Island and Leavenworth to Columbia University. In Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion and Reinvention he reveals what it meant to be a soldier inside the militant Black Panther movement in the 1960s. After being entenced to more than twelve years in Leavenworth, he earned three degrees there and found a new calling, turning his life around.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Slave in the White House

Thursday, February 02, 2012

Elizabeth Dowling Taylor tells the story of Paul Jennings, who was born into slavery on the plantation of James and Dolley Madison in Virginia, and later became part of the Madison household staff at the White House. Her book A Slave in the White House is based on correspondence, legal documents, and journal entries rarely seen before, and reveals attitudes toward slavery of the 19th century.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Jodi Kantor on Controversy Over 'The Obamas'

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Jodi Kantor, correspondent for The New York Times, has written a new book called "The Obamas," which gives an inside look into the first family. Specifically, she reports on Michelle Obama's role as First Lady and her interactions with the President and with his senior advisers. Though Mrs. Obama has not yet read the book, in a CBS This Morning interview she responded that people have tried to portray her as an "angry black woman" since the day her husband announced his bid for the presidency.

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

The Civil War: Celeste Headlee's Story

Monday, January 02, 2012

It's the 150th anniversary of The Civil War and the effects are still with us. Celeste Headlee reflects on her family's role in the Civil War; the branches of her family tree include both slaves and owners. The Civil War is over, but the fight continues; we still argue over whether to fly the Confederate flag and how to teach the history of the war.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Anita Hill on Home, Gender, and Race

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

When Anita Hill testified during the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings in 1991, she sparked a national conversation on sexual harassment and women's equality in politics and the workplace. Now she turns her attention to another symbol of economic success and equality—the home. Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race and Finding Home looks at how the current housing crisis is devastating to families, communities, and cities.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Death of Chinese-American Soldier Draws Attention to Racism in Military

Thursday, December 22, 2011

On Wednesday, eight American soldiers were charged in connection with the death of Pvt. Danny Chen. Chen's body was found lying in a guard tower on an American outpost in Kandahar province in October. The 19-year-old soldier died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. This case echoes the suicide of 21-year-old Lance Corporal Harry Lew in April, another Asian-American who reportedly shot himself while serving with the Marines in Afghanistan. Known as a "minority minority," discrimination against Asian-Americans is frequently goes unreported by victims and the media.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Judge Approves Settlement for Black Farmers

Monday, October 31, 2011

A federal judge signed off on the $1.25 billion settlementbetween U.S. Department of Agriculture and African American farmers who say the agency discriminated against them by denying them loans and other forms of assistance. The case dates back to 1997 and gives tens of thousands of plaintiffs a chance to have their day in court. The Takeaway is joined by Black Farmers and Agriculturalists Association president Gary Grant, whose organization has been leading the fight for this compensation for more than a decade.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Anita Hill on Gender, Race, and Home

Monday, October 10, 2011

When Anita Hill testified during the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings in 1991, she sparked a national conversation on sexual harassment and women's equality in politics and the workplace. Now she turns her attention to another symbol of economic success and equality—the home. Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race and Finding Home looks at how the current housing crisis is devastating to families, communities, and cities.

Comments [21]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Touré on What It Means to Be Black Now

Monday, September 26, 2011

Commentator and journalist Touré tackles what it means to be Black in America today, at a time when racial attitudes have become more complicated and nuanced than ever before. In Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?: What It Means to Be Black Now he examines the concept of “Post-Blackness” and tells how race and racial expectations have shaped his own life and the lives of luminaries such as Reverend Jesse Jackson, Cornel West, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Malcolm Gladwell, Kara Walker, Soledad O'Brien, and Chuck D.

Comments [34]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Racial Politics and the Obama Presidency

Friday, August 26, 2011

Harvard professor of law Randall Kennedy looks at racial politics and the Obama presidency, and examines the complex relationship between the first black president and his African-American constituency. The Persistence of the Color Line: Racial Politics and the Obama Presidency explores the nature of racial opposition to Obama, whether Obama has a singular responsibility to African Americans, the challenges posed by the dream of a post-racial society, and cultural biases.

Comments [41]

The Takeaway

Was Mississippi Killing a Hate Crime?

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

The FBI, police and citizens of the city of Jackson, Missippi are debating whether the white teenagers who robbed and murdered James Craig Anderson, a black man, were motivated by racism. The case has prompted many to consider race relations in the state, and it's troubled history with race. The suspects' lawyers say it was just an act of teenage stupidity, but prosecutors say the killing was a premeditated racial killing. The U.S. Justice Department has begun an investigation into the case. Kim Severson has been reporting on the case for our partner, The New York Times.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Movie Date: 'The Help'

Sunday, August 14, 2011

In this week's Movie Date podcast, Kristen and Rafer talk about "The Help," which tells the story of African-American domestic workers in 1960s Mississippi and the white women they work for. While it's not the summer's best film, both of our intrepid critics have decided that "The Help" is a good date. To find out why, you'll have to take a listen!

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

The Real Life 'Help' in Grand Rapids

Friday, August 12, 2011

On this Friday's show, The Takeaway's co-host John Hockenberry interviewed a guest about domestic workers portrayed in the new film "The Help," only to discover she grew up in the same city he did--Grand Rapids, Mich. But as Hockenberry describes, he and Inez Crockett Smith were living in two totally different worlds.

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

Peter Parker to Miles Morales: A New Spider-Man Is Born

Thursday, August 04, 2011

Everybody was talking about Spider-Man this week. But it wasn't the dangers of the Broadway show, or the latest actor to be playing Spidey on the silver screen. Most conversation revolved around the comic book itself, and the death of longtime character Peter Parker in the Ultimate Spider-Man series from Marvel. He's been replaced with a new protagonist: a half-Latino, half-African-American teenager named Miles Morales. We had two expert guests on the show to talk about their perspectives: Vice Magazine's Nicholas Gazin, and Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso. See how our coverage of the new Spider-Man character developed, what listeners and guests had to say. 

Read More

Comments [1]