Streams

 

Race And Ethnicity

The Leonard Lopate Show

Divided We Stand

Monday, February 04, 2013

Washington Post columnist E. J. Dionne explains that our politicians can’t agree on where we’re going as a country, because they can’t agree on where we’ve been. We take a look at the earliest mavericks of Silicon Valley. Teddy Wayne talks about his latest novel, The Love Song of Jonny Valentine. And we’ll look at school desegregation—and why a group of African Americans challenged the policy in a 2007 Supreme Court case.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Future of Downtown Brooklyn

Thursday, January 03, 2013

Kelly Anderson, filmmaker and director of “My Brooklyn”, and producer Allison Lirish Dean, discuss their film about gentrification in downtown Brooklyn.

→ Event: "My Brooklyn" will be screening at reRun Theater in DUMBO from Jan. 4-10. Purchase tickets here.

Comments [50]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Housing Integration

Thursday, December 06, 2012

ProPublica reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones; Fred Freiberg, Executive Director of the Fair Housing Justice Center; and Betsy Julian, former Housing and Urban Development executive, discuss why the 1968 Fair Housing Act, which was supposed to help integrate cities, has gone largely unenforced, and what HUD should do to integrate cities. Nikole Hannah-Jones has been reporting on the topic for ProPublica, and you can read her articles here, and she's the author of a Kindle single called Living Apart: How the Government Betrayed a Landmark Civil Rights Law.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Race and the Election

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

Ta-Nehisi Coates talks about the role race is playing in this year’s election. His latest article in the September issue of The Atlantic is called “Fear of a Black President.” We’ll look at how race is or is not playing a role in this year’s campaign

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Strange Story of Integration in America

Monday, September 03, 2012

Tanner Colby points out that while racial equality is the law of the land, actual integration is still hard to find, and that in most of the country, black people and white people don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or anywhere. Colby set out to discover why, and in Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America he chronicles America’s relationship with race and integration.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Baratunde Thurston on the Scene in Tampa

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Baratunde Thurston, WNYC special correspondent, author of How to Be Black, and former director of digital at The Onion, talks about the first day of the Republican National Convention and what to expect this week in Tampa.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Politics, Humor, and How to Be Black

Friday, August 17, 2012

Baratunde Thurston, the former director of digital at The Onion, talks about humor, politics, and his book How to Be Black, part memoir and part guidebook. He tells stories of his politically inspired Nigerian name, his hippie mother, his drug-abusing father who was murdered, and his wisdom and expertise in how to be black. Baratunde Thurston is participating in "Tell Your Friends!" with Janeane Garofalo and others at the Cornelia Street Café on August 19 at 8:30.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Fraternity: 1968 at Holy Cross

Monday, July 30, 2012

In 1968, following the death of Martin Luther King, Jr., the Reverend John Brooks, a professor of theology at the College of the Holy Cross recruited 20 African American high school students he felt had the potential to succeed if given an opportunity. Diane Brady tells the story of five of these men, among them were Clarence Thomas, Edward P. Jones, and Theodore Wells. In Fraternity, she looks at how their years at Holy Cross shaped them, and how they went on to shape our country.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Strange Story of Integration in America

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Tanner Colby points out that while racial equality is the law of the land, actual integration is still hard to find, and that in most of the country, black people and white people don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or anywhere. Colby set out to discover why, and in Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America he chronicles America’s relationship with race and integration.

Comments [12]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Athletes and Race in the Last Century

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Theresa Runstedtler and David J. Leonard discuss race in sports. Runstedtler is the author of Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner: Boxing in the Shadow of the Global Color Line, about the first African American World Heavyweight Champion (1908-1915) and his battles with racism around the world. Leonard is the author of After Artest: The NBA and the Assault on Blackness, about the 2004 “Palace Brawl,” a fight between NBA players Ron Artest and Ben Wallace that dramatically altered outside perceptions of the sport.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Clybourne Park”

Friday, June 01, 2012

Jeremy Shamos and Crystal Dickinson discuss their roles in “Clybourne Park,” winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize and London’s Olivier award for Best Play. The play deals with race, real estate, and the volatile values of each. Act One takes is set in 1959, as community leaders try to stop the sale of a home to a black family, and Act Two is set in the same house in the present day, as the now predominantly African-American neighborhood struggles with gentrification. “Clybourne Park” is playing at the Walter Kerr Theatre.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ellis Cose on the End of Anger

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Longtime columnist and contributing editor for Newsweek Ellis Cose examines the intergenerational shifts in how blacks and whites view and interact with each other. The End of Anger: A New Generation's Take on Race and Rage offers a fresh appraisal of the state of white guilt, black rage, and if a postracial America can ever exist.

Comments [30]

It's A Free Country ®

Four Years After Obama, Racial Attitudes Still Predict Votes

Friday, May 25, 2012

Race has played a major factor in these predominately white rural counties. Since the 2008 election, political scientists have been working to measure how racial attitudes are linked to voting, and when it comes to Obama, the data spikes.

Comments [12]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Across That Bridge with Congressman John Lewis

Monday, May 21, 2012

United States Congressman John Lewis discusses how his experience as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement can offer guidance on how to live virtuously and work to change the world. In Across That Bridge: Life Lessons and a Vision for Change, Lewis revisits the lessons of the 1960s to help the electorate once again confront questions of social inequality.

Comments [37]

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Jesse Owens”

Monday, April 30, 2012

Laurens Grant, producer and director of the documentary “Jesse Owens,” tells the story of the athlete whose triumph at the 1936 Olympic Games captivated the world, even as it infuriated the Nazis. Owens’ grace and athleticism rallied crowds around the world, yet when the Olympic gold medalist returned home to America, he couldn’t ride in the front of a bus. “Jesse Owens” premieres on the PBS series American Experience May 1, 2012 at 8:00 pm.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rodney King: from Rebellion to Redemption

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Rodney King talks about what happened the night of March 3, 1991, when he was beaten and tasered by L.A. police officers—an incident caught on videotape, sparking national outrage. When the four police officers were acquitted 13 months later, riots broke out in Los Angeles. In The Riot Within: My Journey from Rebellion to Redemption, King writes about his struggle with alcohol addiction and coming to terms with the incident that made him a household name and caused him emotional and physical damage. He’s joined by his fiancée, Cynthia Kelley, who was one of the jurors from his civil trial against the city of Los Angeles.

Comments [21]

The Leonard Lopate Show

DNA USA

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Geneticist Bryan Sykes discusses examining America, one of the most genetically diverse countries in the world, through its DNA, and what it says about how we perceive race. His book DNA USA: A Genetic Portrait of America takes readers on a historical genetic tour, interviewing genealogists, geneticists, anthropologists, and everyday Americans about their ancestral stories.

Comments [25]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Charlayne Hunter-Gault's Journey Through the Civil Rights Movement

Friday, April 20, 2012

Charlayne Hunter-Gault talks about being one of two black students who forced the University of Georgia to integrate in 1961, and about her new book,  To the Mountaintop: My Journey Through the Civil Rights Movement.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

"Booker’s Place: A Mississippi Story"

Friday, April 20, 2012

In 1965, Frank De Felitta made a documentary about the civil rights struggle in the Mississippi Delta. A black waiter named Booker Wright, who worked at a “whites only” restaurant, spoke openly about his thoughts on segregation in the film, and as a result, he lost his job and was beaten and ostracized. Booker Wright’s granddaughter Yvette Johnson joins Frank De Felitta’s son Raymond De Felitta to discuss about the new documentary directed by Raymond De Felitta, “Booker’s Place: A Mississippi Story,” about who Booker Wright was and how the 1965 film changed his life. "Booker's Place" is playing as part of the Tribeca Film Festival April 22, 25, 26, 28, and opens at the Quad Cinema April 27.

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The Takeaway

Fighting Discrimination in the Criminal Justice System

Monday, April 16, 2012

In March, the Supreme Court heard one of the most widely anticipated cases of this term. In two related cases, Miller v. Alabama and Jackson v. Hobbs, human rights attorney Bryan Stevenson argued that sentencing minors to life in prison without parole is cruel and unusual punishment. Stevenson, the executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative has long dedicated his life to the injustices he sees in America's justice system, especially along racial and socioeconomic lines. Stevenson talks about his work and his commitment to challenging racial discrimination in the criminal justice system.

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