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Race And Ethnicity

Here's The Thing

Bryan Stevenson Wants 'Equal Justice'

Monday, February 16, 2015

The founder of the Equal Justice Initiative talks about confronting the bleak prospects for America's racial future, by addressing the mistakes of the past.  

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Is Justice Reserved for the Rich?

Monday, February 16, 2015

Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, on why he feels that the poor, wrongly condemned, and women and children can too often get lost in our criminal justice system. 

Comments [2]

On The Media

The Distinctions Between "Black" and "African-American"

Friday, December 19, 2014

Are the terms Black and African American actually interchangeable? Emory University's Erika Hall has evidence to show that their usage has different consequences in various environments.

Comments [7]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Leonard Lopate Weekend: "The Talk," Billy Joe Shaver & Richard Pryor's Comedic Genius

Thursday, December 18, 2014

The Leonard Lopate Show's three favorite segments from the last week, in case you missed them. 
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Spinning on Air

Cultures Converge in the Music of Bishi

Sunday, December 07, 2014

Bishi is a singer, composer, multi-media artist, and style icon from London. David Garland welcomes Bishi to the WNYC studio to talk about her life and work, and perform her music.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Does Our Criminal Justice System Treat the Rich and Guilty Better Than the Poor and Innocent?

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, on why he feels that the poor, wrongly condemned, and women and children can too often get lost in our criminal justice system. 

Comments [7]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Major Players: Lasker Award Winners, a Master Art Forger, Race and Theater

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Two of this year’s Lasker Award winners. Kenneth Lonergan and Kieran Culkin on “This Is Our Youth.” Art forger Mark Landis. A look race in theater and how race is explored onstage.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Bringing More Color and Diversity to the Great White Way

Thursday, September 18, 2014

NPR’s Michel Martin and playwrights Kristoffer Diaz and Ayad Akhtar discuss race and diversity on Broadway and look at the ways artists are changing theater.

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The Takeaway

Racist Comments Reverberate Across NBA

Monday, April 28, 2014

The NBA is dealing with the fallout of some harsh news after audio has revealed Los Angeles Clippers Owner Donald Sterling reportedly making a myriad of racist remarks to his girlfriend.

Comments [5]

The Brian Lehrer Show

How to Talk about Your Mixed Race Family

Thursday, December 19, 2013

"My son's not half, he's double."

Comments [62]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Race, Slavery, and America’s Universities

Monday, September 30, 2013

A 2006 report commissioned by Brown University revealed its complex and contested involvement in slavery, setting off a nationwide controversy. But Brown’s troubling past was far from unique. Many of America’s revered colleges and universities—from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to Rutgers, Williams College, and UNC—had been dependent on slavery and were breeding grounds for the racist ideas. Craig Steven Wilder reveals the history of oppression behind the institutions often considered the cradle of liberal politics and his new book Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Smart Cities; Jesmyn Ward on Race, Poverty, Life and Death; David Bromberg Performs; Slavery and Universities

Monday, September 30, 2013

On today’s show: we’ll look into the forces that have shaped the planning and design of great industrial cities from the 19th century to the present. Jesmyn Ward talks about how the deaths of five young men who were close to her, prompted her to look at the role race and poverty played in cutting their lives short. Flat picking guitarist and vocalist David Bromberg performs live. And we’ll discuss the long, complex history that many of our oldest colleges and universities have had with slavery and emancipation.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jesmyn Ward on Men We Reaped

Monday, September 30, 2013

Jesmyn Ward talks about losing five young men in her life to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the problems poverty brings, particularly for black men. In Men We Reaped she writes of the agonizing losses of her only brother and her friends and of her exploration into the forces that shaped their lives and led to their deaths—the racism and economic struggles that fostered drug addiction and the dissolution of family and relationships.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Americanah

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie discusses her latest novel, Americanah, which explores race and identity.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Voting Rights Act and American Democracy

Thursday, July 25, 2013

In June, the Supreme Court effectively struck down the Voting Rights Act of 1965, making it legal for nine states, mostly in the South, to change their election laws without seeking federal approval. Gary May tells the history of the Voting Rights Act and the civil rights workers who fought for justice. In Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy, May describes how black voters overcame centuries of bigotry to secure and preserve their right to register and to vote. He also explains the what Supreme Court ruling means and he discusses renewed efforts to curb voting rights to minorities.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Frank Rich on Race and the GOP

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

New York writer-at-large Frank Rich discusses the Republican strategy to convince mainstream America that it is still the party of Lincoln, even as it fails to win over black voters. In his article “White Wash,” in the May 13 issue of New York magazine, he looks at how the GOP is attempting to remake its image by spinning its racial history.

Comments [12]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Community Reaction to Bombing Suspects

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Tricia Rose, professor of Africana Studies and director of the Center for Race and Ethnicity at Brown University, and author of The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop-And Why It Matters, and Mohamed El Filali,  executive director of The Islamic Center of Passaic County in Paterson, NJ, discuss the complex reactions when we think and talk about the religion and ethnicity of the Boston bombing suspects.

Comments [74]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Taylor Branch on The King Years

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

The Civil Rights era still reverberates in national politics, and Taylor Branch tells the stories of everyday heroes who achieved miracles and yet poignantly fell short. His book The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement brings to life 18 pivotal dramas, from the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott to Martin Luther King’s assassination.

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WNYC News

Actors of Color Less than A Quarter of Roles on NYC Stages

Monday, February 11, 2013

A new report finds that actors of color were cast in less than a quarter of roles on New York City stages last year.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The African American Community that Ended the Era of School Desegregation

Monday, February 04, 2013

Sarah Garland examines why school desegregation, despite its success in closing the achievement gap, was never embraced wholeheartedly in the black community as a remedy for racial inequality. In Divided We Fail: The Story of an African American Community that Ended the Era of School Desegregation Garland tells the stories of the families and individuals who fought for and against desegregation.

Comments [5]