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Race

The Takeaway

Racist Comments Reverberate Across NBA

Monday, April 28, 2014

The NBA is dealing with the fallout of some harsh news after audio has revealed Los Angeles Clippers Owner Donald Sterling reportedly making a myriad of racist remarks to his girlfriend.

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Radio Diaries

#13: The Day Nelson Mandela Became Nelson Mandela

Sunday, April 20, 2014

The moment Nelson Mandela really became Nelson Mandela was on April 20th, 1964 - fifty years ago today. It happened when he stood up in a stuffy South African courtroom and gave a speech.

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WNYC News

A Festival on Baldwin's Black and Gay World

Saturday, April 19, 2014

WNYC

A new festival explores the work of one of the most celebrated writers on the issues of race and sexuality.

"James Baldwin, This Time!" will happen from Wednesday the 23rd until Sunday the 27th at New York Live Arts in Chelsea. The writer of books like Notes of a ...

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Slate Political Gabfest

The Political Gabfest: The Ukraine, You Saw, You Conquered Edition

Friday, April 18, 2014

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring John Dickerson, Emily Bazelon, and Jamelle Bouie. This week: Will Dobson on Ukraine, race in America during the Obama presidency, and allegations of rape against Jameis Winston remain uninvestigated.

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Soundcheck

Nas On 'Illmatic's 20th Anniversary; Radiolab Looks At Hip Hop, Race And Tastemakers

Monday, April 14, 2014

In this episode: You can call him an entrepreneur, a mogul and an actor. But Nasir Jones -- the hugely successful and influential rap emcee Nas -- is best known as one of the greatest musical voices to emerge from New York City. In a conversation with Soundcheck host John Schaefer, Nas reflects on his 1994 debut album Illmatic -- which now being reissued to commemorate its 20th anniversary -- and a documentary film.

Then: Soundcheck presents a new Radiolab podcast segment called “Straight Outta Chevy Chase,” about Peter Rosenberg of the New York hip hop station Hot 97. Raised in suburban Maryland, Rosenberg hustled his way into an on-air position at the country’s most powerful tastemaker in rap, R&B and more. Now, he’s something of an arbiter of authenticity in the genre, so-called “real hip hop.”

The Takeaway

Finding Family Through a Dark Legacy of Slavery

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Tess Taylor and Gayle Jessup White were living separate lives on separate sides of the country, when the two women discovered they were related, through not just anyone, but through the Thomas Jefferson family line.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Micropolis: The Color of Skin

Monday, April 07, 2014

Millions of women around the world use skin-lightening creams. Arun Venugopal, WNYC reporter, discusses the different attitudes towards cosmetics and race and his reporting for the new series, Micropolis.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Portrait of a South African Township

Monday, March 17, 2014

Gugulethu, a township on the outskirts of Cape Town, is an apartheid-era invention, established in the early 1960s to absorb the overflow of migration to the city from other parts of the country. Now it contains almost 100,000 residents, almost all of them black. Justine van der Leun spent more than two years in Gugulethu, and she gives us a vivid portrait of daily life there, as well as a window into the politics and vulnerabilities of South Africa. Van der Leun is a Harper’s magazine contributor, and her article “A Portrait of a Township” is in the March issue.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Racial Profiling, Stand Your Ground, Injustice in the Trayvon Martin Case

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

It’s been two years since an unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by George Zimmerman in Sanford, Florida. Zimmerman was acquitted of second-degree murder in July.

Legal analyst Lisa Bloom covered the trial for NBC. In her book Suspicion Nation: The Inside Story of the Trayvon Martin Injustice and Why We Continue to Repeat It she discusses covering the trial and outlines what she sees as the major mistakes made by the state of Florida that guaranteed it would lose the case. Bloom tells Leonard in this interview that the prosecution blundered by downplaying the issue of race in the courtroom when it should have been central. “I believe racial profiling is at the heart of the case, not only for Zimmerman, but for the police who did a lax job of investigating the case, for the jury, and I have new info from the jury room that substantiates this, from the judge who didn’t want anyone to talk about racial profiling even though it was so obviously a part of the case,” said Bloom. “Not just in that courtroom, but for all of us.”

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Strangers

Liz Fletcher: Little Orphan Edie, a Valentine’s Story

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

A tale of true love spanning four decades, two countries, and classic racial divides... - Get the full story here.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Civil Rights and the March Against Fear

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Aram Goudsouzian tells the story of one of the central dramas of the civil rights era—the “March Against Fear” in Mississippi and the shooting of the leader of the march, James Meredith. Goudsouzian's book Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear reveals the legacy of an event that would both integrate African Americans into the political system and inspire bolder protests against them. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Black Barbershops and the Civil Rights Movement

Friday, January 31, 2014

Historian Quincy T. Mills chronicles the cultural history of black barbershops as businesses and civic institutions. He talks about how barbers played a significant though complicated role in 20th-century racial politics. His book Cutting Along the Color Line: Barbershops is a sweeping history of an iconic cultural establishment that shows how black entrepreneurship was linked to the struggle for equality.

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The Takeaway

The Myth of Race & Its Historical Consequences

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Race is embedded the fabric of American culture, and racial categories and their implications persist today. In "A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama's America," Jacqueline Jones, professor of history at the University of Texas, Austin, argues against our continued use of racial categories—at least in the ways Americans have used these categories since the country's founding. 

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Soundcheck

Stax Records: An Integrated Refuge

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Stax Records built a soul music empire, but Memphis music historian Robert Gordon says it was more than a record label: Stax provided a refuge from the racial tensions roiling the South in the 1960's.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Malcolm Gladwell; Jewish Practice in 2013; Interracial Friendships

Friday, November 29, 2013

We’re replaying some of your favorite segments on this Black Friday. We’ll start with a recent conversation about the nature of Jewish identity and practice with Jane Eisner of The Forward. Plus: Amir Ahmad Nasr talks about how the Internet opened his mind about his own faith; Malcolm Gladwell of The New Yorker discusses his new book, David and Goliath, and the way uneven challenges shape our society; and Baratunde Thurston and Tanner Colby talk about the state of interracial friendships in 2013, including their own.

On Being

Vincent Harding and Phyllis Tickle — Racial Identity in the Emerging Church and the World

Thursday, November 28, 2013

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On Being

Vincent Harding and Phyllis Tickle with Krista Tippett [Unedited Interview]

Thursday, November 28, 2013

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WNYC News

Retailers Join Forces to Tackle 'Shop and Frisk'

Friday, November 22, 2013

WNYC

The heads of several major departments stores and the Rev. Al Sharpton met Friday morning as part of a "shop and frisk" summit intended to reduce racial profiling of minority customers.

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The Takeaway

Have A Criminal Record & Want A Job? Look Elsewhere.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

While it is illegal for employers to reject applicants solely because they may have a criminal record, the practice is widespread. Kai Wright, editor of Colorlines.com, recently wrote an article for The Nation called "Boxed In: How a Criminal Record Keeps You Unemployed For Life." He joins The Takeaway to discuss why our society should be interested in the employment of people with a criminal history and the positive effects it could have.

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The Takeaway

For a Name to Change, Mindset Must Come First

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Today The Takeaway looked at the controversy surrounding the name of a school in Florida. But that’s just one example in the nation—there are also race-based names attached to creeks, street signs and sports teams. Joining The Takeaway to weigh in on the psychological effects of a name and whether any historical value is lost in the changing of a name is Dr. Leah Wright, professor of history and African American studies at Wesleyan.

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