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Race

The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Identifying Race, Morning Headlines

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

A new study out suggests people with mixed race backgrounds now identify themselves as black more often than white. If you have a mixed race background, which box do you check?

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The Takeaway

More Biracial Americans Experiment with Fluid Identity

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

A research paper published by the Social Psychology Quarterly drew some interesting conclusions about the way that members of our increasingly diverse society are experiencing and experimenting with structures of identity. Titled “Passing as Black: Racial Identity Work Among Biracial Americans,” the paper argues that with less stigma attached to any one race, people of mixed heritage are, more frequently than before, declaring themselves biracial one day, or all one race the next. But what does this fluidity mean to the idea of race in our country at all? And How does one rationally and honestly navigate the conundrums of identity?

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The Takeaway

Black, Biracial or Mixed?

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

A new study says that biracial Americans of black and white ancestry are more often self-identifying as black. The study, published in the Social Psychology Quarterly, finds that the majority of black-white biracial adults surveyed said they called themselves black.

The authors of the study describe this phenomenon "reverse passing."

"Most notably, we find a striking reverse pattern of passing today—while passing during the Jim Crow era involved passing as white, these respondents more often report passing as black today."

Weigh in: If you are the son or daughter of mixed-race parents, or if your parents are of different religions, what do you call yourself? How has this changed over time?

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WQXR Blog

Bizarre Holiday Traditions

Thursday, December 02, 2010

What I enjoy most about this time of year is the tradition of season. But until now I never seriously thought about how my indulging in these sacred traditions could be an affront to someone else.

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The Takeaway

Tales from 'The Great Migration'

Thursday, November 25, 2010

The massive migration of black Americans from the South to the North in the early part of last century changed the social and cultural landscape of America forever. Six million African Americans eventually left the South around 1920. Before then, 90 percent of all African Americans lived in the south. By 1970, nearly half lived elsewhere in the country.

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The Arts File

US History Takes the Broadway Stage

Friday, November 19, 2010

Time Out New York Theater Editor David Cote weighs in on the assets and pitfalls putting history onstage.

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The Takeaway

Walter Mosley on 'The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey'

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Walter Mosley is widely known for his best-selling historical mysteries featuring Easy Rawlins — a hard-boiled black detective and World War II veteran living in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. But Mosley's writing spans a number of genres, including science fiction, graphic novels, young adult literature, and political non-fiction. His newest book is called “The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey.” It centers on 91-year-old Ptolemy Grey, an African American living alone in violent South Central L.A.. Suffering from dementia and poor health, Ptolemy seems ready to give up on life, until he meets a 17-year-old girl who may be able to help him recover his lucidity...at a cost.

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It's A Free Blog

Angry Barack Man

Friday, November 05, 2010

People accusing Barack Obama of being insufficiently “angry” need a Shaft fix. After that, they should get back to evaluating our President as a human being rather than as a stereotype.

Yes, stereotype. How “angry” are people waiting for a United States president to look, and why so much concern about it with this president?

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The Takeaway

How Ethnicity Factored in the Midterms

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

Last night, Latinos carried Harry Reid to victory in Nevada, while more blacks voted for Republican candidates than ever before. Black Republicans made gains in the House, though in the Senate, there will no longer be a black presence. Andra Gillespie, assistant professor of political science at Emory University, and Theeda Skocpol look at how Latinos and blacks shaped yesterday's elections.

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It's A Free Country ®

Obama and the Base that Isn't

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

WNYC
"There is no doubt that when Barack Obama chose Geitner and Summers it was a slap in the face of poor people it was a slap in the face of working people it was clear that jobs and homes and crime would be after thoughts and the first priority would the investment banks, Wall Street, elites and oligarchs. It was a very revealing move."

- Cornel West, University Professor in the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Brian Leung on Chinese Americans in the Wild West

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

When we look back on the wild west of American history, we frequently celebrate cowboys and Indians, wild buffalo and wide open country. But what we often leave out are the thousands of Chinese-Americans who worked on the Union Pacific railroad, lived in the many coal-mining towns, and struggled against the prejudices of their white neighbors and employers.

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It's A Free Country ®

Bullhorn: End The War on Drugs, Obama

Friday, October 08, 2010

If Barack Obama and the Democrats really wanted to re-arouse the coalition of voters that gave Obama the White House two years ago, all it would take is a single issue we aren’t hearing about amidst the earnest back-and-forths over health care, TARP and taxing small business.

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The Takeaway

Danielle Evans and 'Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self'

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

At 26, Danielle Evans is already the kind of writer who makes other writers jealous. She's still fresh from the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, but she's already been chosen – twice –  for The Best American Short Stories, and both Salman Rushdie and Richard Russo have praised her work. There's already a lot of buzz around her new book, a collection of eight short stories called “Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self.” She joins us to talk about the challenges of being a young black writer in a world that's not over race, but may be over talking about it.

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It's A Free Country ®

Bullhorn: The Narrow Debate on Race Distorts Political Labels

Sunday, October 03, 2010

“You’re not as conservative as I thought!” I hear this all the time. I’ve learned that when media outlets seek me out, it is best to let them know early on that I cannot serve as right-wing “balance” in a quest for a “diversity” of black voices, and that my politics are best described as cranky liberal.

But that’s not the reputation that precedes me. Why the confusion? Because I write about race politics, and when you venture into that territory, today’s narrow view of what’s acceptably liberal quickly distorts ideological labels.

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The Takeaway

Fears of Discrimination Over Sickle Cell Testing

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

It is now mandatory that athletes wanting to particpate in NCAA Division I sports be tested for sickle cell anemia. The new rule has some people worried that it could lead to racial discrimination.

Put in affect in April, it's aimed to prevent the sudden death of young athletes such as 19-year-old Dale Lloyd II, who died suddenly in 2006 after a rigorous practice for Rice University's football team.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

The Personal Toll of the Great Migration

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Why don't we talk more about the Great Migration, a time that saw six million African Americans leave the South in search of work and freedom? Our own Celeste Headlee is, herself, a product of this slow, leaderless shift that occurred over the course of six decades. She shares her family's story.

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The Takeaway

Do a Civil Rights Photographer's FBI Ties Complicate His Legacy?

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Ernest Withers was a civil rights-era photojournalist who had access to some of the highest levels of the movement; over the weekend, we learned that Withers may have used his extraordinary access to sell information to the FBI, perceived enemies of the movement’s leaders.  

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

My Great Migration Story

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

My grandfather didn't tell me the story of his childhood, of his birth in Mississippi and his school years in Arkansas. The story of my family (at least one side of it) is the story of adversity and triumph, but I didn't know that growing up. My great grandmother was the child of a black slave and a Scotch-Irish plantation overseer, the product of years of a rape that produced six children. But out of violence came one unlikely stroke of luck. Her Mississippi father developed such a strong affection for his mixed-race children that he provided them with small plots of land and advanced educations. And that's the environment into which my grandfather was born in 1895.  So my family has been stable financially and well educated since the days of Reconstruction.

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The Takeaway

An Oral History of the Great Migration

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

The massive migration of black Americans from the South to the North in the early part of last century changed the social and cultural landscape of America forever.  Six million African Americans eventually left the South around 1920.  Before then, 90 percent of all African Americans lived in the south.  By 1970, nearly half lived elsewhere in the country. 

We're asking our African American listeners: Does your family have a story about the Great Migration? If so, we'd love to hear it: When did your family come north? Why did they leave the South? Tell us your story...

Comments [7]

Features

Fashion Faux Pas? You Decide!

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

The New York-based fashion brand Proenza Schouler recently released a video called "Act da Fool" to help sell its fall collection. Harmony Korine created it. Does the video perpetuate stereotypes or showcase an edgy, new line?

Comments [3]