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Race

The Takeaway

Real Help on "The Help"

Friday, August 12, 2011

This week, millions of eager fans will be flocking to see the film “The Help.” Based on the best-selling novel by Kathryn Stockett, “The Help” is about African-American domestic workers in Mississippi during the 1960s. As an act of civil disobedience, the women tell their stories to a young, white editor in their community, who goes on to publish them.

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The Takeaway

The Real Life 'Help' in Grand Rapids

Friday, August 12, 2011

On this Friday's show, The Takeaway's co-host John Hockenberry interviewed a guest about domestic workers portrayed in the new film "The Help," only to discover she grew up in the same city he did--Grand Rapids, Mich. But as Hockenberry describes, he and Inez Crockett Smith were living in two totally different worlds.

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The Takeaway

Lessons For London From Newark

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

In 1967, police arrested an African-American cab driver in Newark, N.J. setting off six days of rioting. Last week, the police fatally shot black Briton Mark Duggan; an event that many are calling the spark that ignited four days (to date) of rioting in the U.K. But do the similarities end there? Many would argue that the underlying causes of the 1967 Newark riots — rampant joblessness, alienation and racial disparity — are the same as those that incited riots in the U.K. this week, as well as the riots that overtook America's cities in the late 1960's.

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Features

NY International Latino Film Festival Ads Poke Fun at Stereotypes

Thursday, August 04, 2011

Celebrities walk the red carpet on Tuesday night at the 12th annual New York International Latino Film Festival. This year, the festival has a provocative new advertising campaign.

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The Takeaway

Peter Parker to Miles Morales: A New Spider-Man Is Born

Thursday, August 04, 2011

Everybody was talking about Spider-Man this week. But it wasn't the dangers of the Broadway show, or the latest actor to be playing Spidey on the silver screen. Most conversation revolved around the comic book itself, and the death of longtime character Peter Parker in the Ultimate Spider-Man series from Marvel. He's been replaced with a new protagonist: a half-Latino, half-African-American teenager named Miles Morales. We had two expert guests on the show to talk about their perspectives: Vice Magazine's Nicholas Gazin, and Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso. See how our coverage of the new Spider-Man character developed, what listeners and guests had to say. 

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Features

Marvel Comics Unveils New Biracial Spider-Man from Brooklyn

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

A comic book that hit shelves on Wednesday will introduce the world to a new Spider-Man: Miles Morales, a Black, Latino 13-year-old from Brooklyn, New York.

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The Takeaway

New Spider-Man Comic Debuts With a Twist

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

The latest issue of the long-running Spider-Man comic book series comes out today, and there's a brand-new protagonist. Miles Morales, a half-Latino, half-African-American teenager is taking over the blue and red tights from Peter Parker, who was killed off recently. Marvel creators seized the opportunity to diversify the beloved American superhero series. Will comic enthusiasts come to love the new, multiethnic Spider-Man?

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The Takeaway

Wealth Gap Between Whites and Minorities Increases

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

The wealth gap between whites and minorities in the United States has ballooned to its largest ratios in decades, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center. Hispanics were the hardest hit in the recession, seeing their median wealth shrink 66 percent between 2005 and 2009, while white Americans only saw a dip of 16 percent.

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The Takeaway

How the 'Red Summer' of 1919 Sparked the Civil Rights Movement

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Many of us trace the Civil Rights movement back to the Montgomery Bus Boycott and Rosa Parks' arrest in 1955. But the true beginning may have been during the summer of 1919, remembered as "Red Summer," when race riots erupted across the country. At that time, NAACP membership grew exponentially, as black World War I veterans returned from fighting for democracy abroad and demanded freedom at home. Despite President Woodrow Wilson's promise to further human rights in the U.S., the federal government turned a blind eye and did little to even to protect African-Americans from racial violence.

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The Takeaway

Excerpt: 'Red Summer'

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

An excerpt from "Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America," by Cameron McWhirter.

1.
Carswell Grove
[T]here has been nobody suffered in this matter like I have. I did not do nothing at all to cause that riot.
JOE RUFFIN

1. Carswell Grove

[T]here has been nobody suffered in this matter like I have. I did not do nothing at all to cause that riot.

JOE RUFFIN

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The Takeaway

Gary Younge on Identity in the 21st Century

Friday, July 01, 2011

The number of immigrants living in the United States and Western Europe continues to grow. As the foreign-born population increases, so does anxiety about our identity. What does it mean to be American or British or Italian today? How does our identity—our ethnicity, gender, and/or race—change how we vote and contribute to civic life?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Plessy and Ferguson

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Artist Keith Plessy, President of the Plessy & Ferguson Foundation, and Phoebe Ferguson, photographer, documentary filmmaker, and co-founder of the Foundation, discuss their friendship and the idea of "separate but equal" in today's society. Plessy is a descendant of Homer Plessy, and Ferguson is the great-granddaughter of Judge John Ferguson, author of the decision upholding segregation that was affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1896 in Plessy v. Ferguson.

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The Takeaway

Young Writer Tackles Race, Religion, American Identity

Wednesday, June 01, 2011

Every year, the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards honor the best high school and middle school students in a variety of categories, including painting, journalism and fiction. Past winners include leaders and luminaries in their respective fields, including Joyce Carol Oates, Andy Warhol and Truman Capote. Some 185,000 pieces of art and writing submitted this year, and eighteen-year-old Haris Durrani was one of seven high school seniors to win a gold medal for a portfolio of writing, out of 3,000 portfolio entries.

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Features

At BAM, 'The Landlord' Shows Park Slope Before Gentrification Took Hold

Thursday, May 12, 2011

On Thursday, Slope residents can get a rare glimpse of the neighborhood's grittier past on the big screen. As part of its celebration of filmmaker Hal Ashby, BAMcinématek is screening his little-seen 1970 gem "The Landlord."

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The Takeaway

Freedom Rides Turn 50

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

50 years ago today, brave men and women white and black boarded buses in Washington, D.C. and rode through the South, with their final destination being a rally in New Orleans. On their way there, they encountered violent racist attacks, including from members of the Ku Klux Klan, who firebombed them in Alabama. Jim Zwerg and Glenda Gaither Davis were both passengers on those buses, and they join us today to share their memories, and hopes for the future.

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The Takeaway

New Documentary Tells Loving Story of Interracial Marriage

Friday, April 22, 2011

In 1958, a Virginia couple named Mildred and Richard Loving married each other, only to be arrested shortly thereafter in middle of the night. Their crime: breaking the Racial Integrity Act of 1924, which criminalized marriages between white and non-white persons. Mildred was of African and Native American descent. Richard was of European descent. The Lovings initially pled guilty to the charges, but eventually fought back with a series of lawsuits that culminated in the Supreme Court case Loving v. Virginia. In 1967, the court ruled unanimously in their favor, proclaiming that laws criminalizing interracial marriage violated the Fourteenth Amendment.

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The Takeaway

Civil War: Still a Difficult Race Issue

Thursday, April 14, 2011

It's the 150th anniversary of The Civil War and the effects are still with us. Celeste Headlee reflects on her family's role in the Civil War; the branches of her family tree include both slaves and owners. The Civil War is over, but the fight continues; we still argue over whether to fly the Confederate flag and how to teach the history of the war.

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The Takeaway

Black Confederate Soldiers: Myth or Reality?

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

On Tuesday, to mark the 150-year anniversary of the start of the Civil War, we aired a segment featuring two African-American men whose ancestors fought with the confederate army. Nelson Winbush and Stan Armstrong said they are proud of their relatives' military service. But to some of our listeners the segment smacked of misinformation. Did African-Americans fight in the Confederate Army in the Civil War? And if so, did they do so out of free will or as enslaved people?

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The Takeaway

Civil War Anniversary: Celebration of Confederacy or Segregation Reminder?

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. For whites in the south, the anniversary marks the start of a proud military engagement. For blacks in the south, the war led to the end of slavery and the start of the civil rights movement. And while celebrations for the event will be grand in scale and scope, this year's commemoration will not reverberate nationally as it did during the centennial. How do the two anniversaries compare? 

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The Takeaway

Frederick Douglass Descendant on Civil War Anniversary

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Many Americans are related to people who fought and died in the Civil War. But imagine that you’re related not just to one figure we associate with the Civil War and aftermath, but two. This is the case for Kenneth Morris. Not only is he the great-great-great grandson of abolitionist and Lincoln adviser Frederick Douglass, he’s also the great-great grandson of Booker T. Washington, the post-Civil War educator and activist. On top of that, Morris is the Founder president of the Frederick Douglass Family Foundation, which aims to eradicate modern-day slavery.

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