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Race

Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The Greatest Ad You’ll Ever See Gabfest

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring John Dickerson, David Plotz, and Emily Bazelon. This week: The Aurora Colorado shooting aftermath, Republicans and Jews, and the Olympics

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Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The Another Boring White Guy Gabfest

Friday, July 20, 2012

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring John Dickerson, David Plotz, and Emily Bazelon. This week: The latest from the Presidential race, the Republican Vice Presidential Sweepstakes, and Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Britain takes le Tour by storm

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Britain takes le Tour by storm

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The Takeaway

Diverse Neighborhood, Uniform Friends

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Tanner Colby is what you might call a typical, liberal, city-dwelling, 30-something white guy. But one day he looked around and realized something: Despite living in Brooklyn, one of the most diverse cities in the world, he had no black friends.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Black Unemployment and Presidential Politics

Monday, July 09, 2012

Black unemployment is 14.4% and rose a full point in June. Kai Wright, editorial director of Colorlines and Nation contributor, discusses the presidential contest and the latest unemployment figures —particularly as those numbers vary by race.

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The Takeaway

Rev. Cynthia L. Hale on Race Relations Since Obama

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

When he ran for President, then-Senator Barack Obama campaigned on the promise of hope. For many, that hope meant a post-racial era, one when an African-American man could lead a country with a sordid racial history. The Reverend Dr. Cynthia L. Hale, senior pastor of the Ray of Hope Christian Church in Decatur, Georgia, doesn't think America is past racism but has hope for the future.

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The Takeaway

Thirty Years Later: The Killing Of Vincent Chin

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Thirty years ago this month, against the backdrop of a suffering American auto industry, and a growing Japanese one, a young Chinese American man named Vincent Chin was beaten to death by two white auto workers. Neither was found guilty of murder or served any jail time. The case galvanized the Asian American civil rights movement and introduced many Americans to the notion of hate crimes before U.S. hate crime laws existed.

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Micropolis

Micropolis: Why Broadway Audiences Are Whiter Than Ever

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Broadway audiences historically have been overwhelmingly white. Last season, 83 percent of Broadway audiences were Caucasians – the highest percentage since the industry began keeping numbers. But just 1.5 percent of the overall audience last season was African American – the lowest it’s ever been.

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The Takeaway

Black Mormons on This Year's Presidential Election

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Whether you love or hate politics, it’s hard to deny that when it comes to identity and culture, this year’s presidential election is truly historic. The incumbent is, of course, half black and thus, a racial minority. The challenger is Mormon, and thus, a religious minority. What if you’re one of the one million Americans who is both black and Mormon? How does identity factor in? Two African-American Mormons join us today to share their thoughts.

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The Takeaway

Race Dialogue Should Be Less About Conflict, More About Peace

Friday, May 18, 2012

Celeste Headlee, co-host of The Takeaway, speaks at the National Race Amity Conference in Boston today. Richard Thomas, professor emeritus of history at Michigan State University is also talking at the conference. He’s the creator of the race relations concept, "The Other Tradition," which focuses on the efforts of those who, during times of racial conflict, have worked across racial lines to promote friendship and peace. William Smith is the founding executive director of the National Center for Race Amity, based at Wheelock College in Boston, and is the organizer of the annual National Race Amity Conference.

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The Takeaway

Fenway Park's Troubled Racial Past

Friday, May 18, 2012

Fenway Park, the Boston Red Sox’s storied ballpark, celebrated it’s 100th birthday late last month. And in honor of the centennial, moments in Red Sox history were remembered and relived like the "Curse of the Bambino." But today, we’re talking about one element of Fenway’s history that is rarely spoken of: it’s troubled racial past.

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The Takeaway

Why Aren't There More Minorities in the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship?

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Few sports have been more racially divided than golf. Realizing that the NCAA was not inviting athletes from historically black colleges and Hispanic- and Native American-serving institutions to compete in their regional golf tournaments, the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship was created to open the doors. In recent years, however, there appear to be fewer and fewer minorities in the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship.

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The Takeaway

Confronting Misconceptions About Race, Weight, and Body Image

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

It’s widely believed that in America, Asians are rarely overweight, and more likely to be healthy as a result of that. It’s also widely believed that black people are more likely than other groups to have a positive body image regardless of their size. In fact, the picture is much more complicated.

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The Takeaway

Black Politics in 'Post-Racial' America

Tuesday, May 08, 2012

In 2007, during his contentious primary race with Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama spent a week campaigning with Newark Mayor Corey Booker and Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick. The media continually highlighted the difference between these three young, African-American politicians and the generation of black leaders that came before them. A new book by Professor Andra Gillespie examines the new generation of black politicians exemplified by President Obama through the lens of Cory Booker's mayoral election and his tenure in Newark.

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The Takeaway

An Infamous Dinner: Washington, Roosevelt and Race in America

Tuesday, May 08, 2012

When Sen. John McCain conceded the presidency to Barack Obama, McCain said: "A century ago, President Theodore Roosevelt's invitation of Booker T. Washington to dine at the White House was taken as an outrage in many quarters. America today is a world away from the cruel and frightful bigotry of that time." Author Deborah Davis chronicles that dinner, its aftermath, and the lives of Roosevelt and Washington in her new book.

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The Takeaway

Follow Friday: Romney's Gay Spokesman, Newt Gingrich Drops Out

Friday, May 04, 2012

Every Friday, The Takeaway convenes a panel to look back at the week's big stories. This week, we'll hear more about Newt Gingrich pulling out of the Presidential race; Richard Grenell, the openly gay foreign policy spokesperson who resigned from Mitt Romney's campaign just days after joining it; and Elizabeth Warren's Native American heritage. Ron Christie is a Takeaway contributor and Republican political strategist. And Farai Chideya is ajournalist and blogger.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

L.A. Uprising 20 Years Later

Friday, April 27, 2012

Tricia Rose,  professor of Africana Studies at Brown University and author of The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop-And Why It Matters, discusses race in America 20 years after the L.A. violence stemming from the Rodney King verdict. Gary Phillipswriter, activist, South Central native, contributor to Dr. Pop, and author of several books, including Violent Spring, his mystery novel set in the aftermath of '92, joins the conversation.

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The Takeaway

Anna Deavere Smith Reflects on Rodney King and LA Riots, 20 Years Later

Friday, April 27, 2012

On April 29, 1992, nearly 20 years ago, an all-white jury acquitted four white Los Angeles Police Officers in the case of Rodney King, a black motorist who suffered severe injuries after a brutal beating from the LAPD. South Los Angeles promptly exploded into riots that lasted six days, leaving more than 50 people dead, thousands injured, and $1 billion in damage. Anna Deavere Smith is an playwright, actress and author of "Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992," a one-woman show that Smith developed from interviews with 300 subjects involved in the Rodney King case and its aftermath. She reflects on the riots that tore the city apart, 20 years ago, and discusses whether and how police-community relations have changed since 1992.

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The Takeaway

The All-White World of 'Girls'

Friday, April 27, 2012

"Girls," written by and starring Lena Dunham, was initially the subject of overwhelming praise for telling the story of twenty-something New York females in a new way. But in the two weeks since the series premiered, "Girls" went from being praised to being the object of overwhelming vitriol. From the blogosphere to the New York Times, critics have asked: Why does this show, which takes place in Brooklyn, New York in 2012, have an entirely white cast? Russell Robinson is professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of a study on race, ethnicity and gender casting in Hollywood. Melissa Silverstein is the editor of Women and Hollywood and the artistic director of the Athena Film Festival.

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The Takeaway

The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia

Thursday, April 26, 2012

In Jim Crow America, African Americans were relegated to the status of second class citizens. Through laws and social norms, racism was legitimized and the practice operated as a way of life. Now, there is a museum remembering the era: the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia. Our Detroit reporter from WDET, Martina Guzman, spoke with the museum's curator Renee Romano about how his past informed his vision of the museum.

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