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Publishing

To the Best of Our Knowledge

The Codex Seraphinianus

Sunday, April 19, 2015

This book really got us excited. 12 x 36. 10 pounds. Everyone wanted to touch it. Borrow it. Talk about it. It felt like magic. And the title was just as mysterious – Codex Seraphinianus. Publisher Charles Mier tell us what the hell it is (and what is isn't). Want to see the first 74 pages of the "world's weirdest book"?

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WNYC News

Taxpayer Subsidy Allows Time Inc. To Slash Jobs

Friday, March 06, 2015

A $7 million state grant kept the publisher of Time and Sports Illustrated from moving to New Jersey. But Time can still cut nearly a third of its workforce.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Making It As A Writer

Sunday, February 08, 2015

Laura Van Den Berg has the kind of literary success writers dream of. Her debut novel comes out later this month, and already it's become one of the most anticipated books of the year. But for Laura, writing hasn't always been easy.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

MFA or NYC?

Sunday, February 08, 2015

Chad Harbach is a cofounder and coeditor of the literary magazine N+1. A few years ago, he penned a widely circulated essay looking at the rise of creative writing MFA programs in the US. He believes they're creating a distinctly new literary culture, with its own set of motivations and goals.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Dangerous Idea: Do Not Write For Free

Sunday, February 08, 2015

Writer and activist Yasmin Nair's Dangerous Idea? Writers should always 

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

The Decline of the Creative Class

Sunday, February 08, 2015

It's not just writers that are struggling to make a living these days. Artists and other creative types are also feeling the pinch, especially as more and more businesses that support them disappear — think indie record stores or bookstores. Scott Timberg is a writer who believes the arts economy is collapsing. He tells Sara Nics that if the trend continues, the only artists who'll surive are those at the very top.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Self-Publishing Success

Sunday, February 08, 2015

In 2011, as a relatively unknown writer, Hugth Howey released a dystopian science fiction novella on the internet. Readers loved it and clamored for more. Before any print copies had even been published, Howey's WOOL series sold hundeds of thousands of copies, earning him a small fortune. He believes that self-publishing is the future for lots of writers.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

New African Literature

Sunday, February 01, 2015

 It’s time for you to meet the next wave of African fiction and our guest has compiled their writing together in the book “Africa39” – an anthology of 39 African writers under the age of 39

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Is Amazon Good, Or Evil? A Debate

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Amazon accounts for 41 percent of all new book sales. But is the company a reader's friend? We tackle the question in this preview to this Intelligence Squared debate.

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PRI's The World

Graphic images of war are hard to stomach — but some say they're necessary

Thursday, September 11, 2014

When news outlets decide to publish graphic photos of war and violence, they often face censorship, opposition or anger for doing so. In the wake of the release of ISIS beheading videos, one journalist argues that there is value in bearing witness to war, even its ugliest parts.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Should The U.S. Adopt An 'Anti-Amazon' Law?

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

France bans online booksellers from offering free shipping on discounted books. The law is designed to help independent book stores survive. Should the U.S. have a similar law?

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On The Media

A Comics Artist Is Taking On Amazon

Thursday, July 03, 2014

Artist Anders Nilsen wades into the increasingly public dispute between Amazon and Hachette.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

James Patterson on Middle School and Publishing

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

James Patterson, best-selling author and "book activist," just offered all NYC public school 6th graders a free copy of his book, Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life. He talks about his role as an advocate for books, bookstores...and the publishing business in Hachette's battle with Amazon.... What book would you like to share with every 6th grader?

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Soundcheck

Paul Williams Gets Musicians Paid At ASCAP, And Inspires Daft Punk

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

The current President and Chairmen of ASCAP is singer, songwriter, and actor Paul Williams -- best known for writing “The Rainbow Connection,” from The Muppet Movie and starring in the film Smokey and the Bandit. He even worked with Daft Punk on their most recent album. Williams talks about his long career in show biz and his dual roles of making music and protecting the rights of musicians like himself. 

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New Tech City

NY Judge Rules Apple Must Modify E-Book Contracts to Prevent Price Fixing

Friday, September 06, 2013

Tech giant Apple will have to modify contracts with publishers to prevent price fixing for electronic books as a result of a ruling by a federal judge in New York Friday.

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On The Media

Syria Coverage, Nazi Collaborations with Hollywood, and More

Friday, September 06, 2013

The media's cautious coverage of Syria, a look inside the sordid world of Washington D.C., and the pact between Hollywood and Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

On The Media

Book Country

Friday, September 06, 2013

Book Country is a website from Penguin Random House that enables thousands of amateur writers to exchange manuscripts and notes. Some even go on to get their work published. It's like an online MFA program from the comfort of your laptop. Bob speaks to Molly Barton the Global Digital Director for Penguin at Penguin Random House, and Carl E. Reed, an active Book Country user, about the site.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hothouse: Inside Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Friday, August 02, 2013

Farrar, Straus and Giroux is arguably the most influential publishing house of the modern era—home to 25 Nobel Prize winners and generation-defining authors like T. S. Eliot, Flannery O’Connor, Susan Sontag, Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, Philip Roth, and Jonathan Franzen. Boris Kachka reveals the era and the city that built FSG through the stories of two men: founder-owner Roger Straus and his utter opposite, the reticent, closeted editor Robert Giroux. In Hothouse: The Art of Survival and the Survival of Art at America’s Most Celebrated Publishing House, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Kachka pulls back the curtain to expose how elite publishing works today.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Apple vs. Amazon On E-Books

Monday, July 15, 2013

Apple lost an anti-trust case on e-book pricing, Nook failed, and Amazon still reignsMichael Cader, founder of Publishers Marketplace and Publishers Lunch, looks at the future of the book publishing world. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Starting a New Literary Journal

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Uzoamaka Maduka talks about founding The American Reader, a new literary journal of litera­ture and criticism. The idea for the journal was hatched “on a fire escape in Washington Heights.”

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