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Psychology

The Leonard Lopate Show

Good and Evil; the Story of Dancer Tanaquil le Clercq; Roddy Doyle's Novel, The Guts; Brothers Who Shaped History

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

On today’s show: Cognitive scientist Paul Bloom explains why he thinks that a moral sense of good and evil is hardwired into our brains from birth. Director Nancy Biurski talks about her documentary about Tanaquil le Clercq, the ballet star who was a muse to George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins before she was paralyzed by polio at the age of 27. Roddy Doyle discusses his new novel The Guts, which picks up the story of his bestseller, The Commitments, almost 30 years later. And we’ll look at how John Foster Dulles and his brother Allen Dulles led the United States into foreign conflicts in the 1950s and how we’re still feeling the aftereffects today.

The Takeaway

Why Women Don't Brag—And Why They Should

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Research shows that men are far more likely to brag than women—women feel anxiety and discomfort about bragging and tend to subscribe to a more traditional idea of modesty. But what if you could find the source of that anxiety and eliminate it? Jessi Smith, an Associate Professor of Psychology at Montana State University, discusses her research and what it means for women in the workplace.

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Life of the Law

Release Day

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

For eighteen years, California’s three strikes law leveled harsh penalties against repeat felons: anyone with two felony convictions received 25 years to life for committing a third felony. In 2012, Californians voted to change the three strikes law,

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What Goes on Inside a Teenager's Brain?

Thursday, January 09, 2014

Neuropsychiatrist Daniel J. Siegel explains how brain development impacts teenagers’ behavior and relationships. He argues that that if parents and teenagers understand the brain better, they can better cope with the moodiness, poor judgment, and impulsiveness that the adolescent brain transformation can bring. Dr. Siegel is the author of Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain.

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Life of the Law

Dibs!

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

With all the snow in the US, we thought we'd bring back an old episode: Dibs. Sit back, stay warm, and listen to an old episode from Life of the Law. - After a big snowstorm, the streets of many northern cities start to get cluttered with furniture.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Journey through America’s Self-Help Culture

Monday, January 06, 2014

Jessica Lamb-Shapiro talks about growing up immersed in the culture of self-help as the daughter of a widowed child psychologist and parenting author. In Promise Land: My Journey through America’s Self-Help Culture she looks at the many self-help options out there and whether they can deliver what they promise.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Neuroscientist Joshua Greene argues that our brains were designed for tribal life, for getting along with a select group of others (Us) and for fighting off everyone else (Them). But modern times have forced the world’s tribes into a shared space, resulting in epic clashes. Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them combines neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy to reveal the underlying causes of modern conflict. Dr. Greene is an award-winning teacher and scientist, and he directs Harvard University’s Moral Cognition Lab, which uses neuroscience and cognitive techniques to understand how people really make moral decisions.

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Life of the Law

On Prison and Pregnancy

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

United States incarcerates six times as many women as it did thirty years ago. Many of these women are already mothers, and four percent of incarcerated women enter prison pregnant. What happens to the babies born in the correctional system?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Reid Technique and False Confessions

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

New Yorker contributor Douglas Starr examines the Reid Technique of interrogation and whether it can prompt innocent people to confess to crimes they didn’t commit. Police forces, the military, the F.B.I., the C.I.A., the Secret Service have been trained in the method, but a growing number of scientists and legal scholars have raised concerns about Reid-style interrogation leading to false confessions. His article “The Interview” appears in the December 9 issue of The New Yorker.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Are We Born Knowing Right from Wrong?

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Paul Bloom, professor of psychology at Yale and the author of Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil (Crown, 2013), argues that even though research shows we're born with a sense of justice, reason plays a part in how society defines morality.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Neuroscientist Joshua Greene argues that our brains were designed for tribal life, for getting along with a select group of others (Us) and for fighting off everyone else (Them). But modern times have forced the world’s tribes into a shared space, resulting in epic clashes. Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them combines neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy to reveal the underlying causes of modern conflict. Dr. Greene is an award-winning teacher and scientist, and he directs Harvard University’s Moral Cognition Lab, which uses neuroscience and cognitive techniques to understand how people really make moral decisions.

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The Takeaway

How the ACA is Changing Mental Health Care

Friday, November 01, 2013

Though the federal insurance exchange site is still be plagued with technical bugs and people are continuing to receive policy cancellation notices from their insurers, there are still plenty of changes being brought about by the Affordable Care Act that many people are happy about. For example, many experts agree mental health care will improve due to the ACA rollout. Linda Rosenberg, President and CEO of the National Council for Behavioral Health, explains what changes to expect for the way mental health care is accessed and delivered.

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The Takeaway

Daydream Believer: Examining the Tangible Benefits of Idle Thought

Friday, October 18, 2013

It's good for the kids!

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Life of the Law

Judging Steinbeck’s Lennie

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

In 2002, the Supreme Court ruled that it is unconstitutional to execute people with mental disabilities. But the Court left it up to individual states to define mentally disabled. After the Texas legislature failed to agree on a definition,

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Our Social Lives and Our Genes

Monday, August 26, 2013

David Dobbs explains how epigenetics works and looks at how our social lives affect our genes. Studies have shown that our genes are socially fluid and social isolation can be deadly.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Untold Story of the Notorious Milgram Psychology Experiments

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Psychologist Gina Perry tells the full story of a controversial experiment by psychologist Stanley Milgram and its repercussions. In the summer of 1961, Milgram invited volunteers to take part in an experiment at Yale, and he reported that 65 percent of the volunteers had repeatedly administered electric shocks of increasing strength to a man they believed to be in severe pain, even suffering a life-threatening heart condition, because they had been ordered to by an authority figure. In Behind the Shock Machine: The Untold Story of the Notorious Milgram Psychology Experiments, Perry interviewed the original participants—many of whom remain haunted about what they did—and pieces together a more complex—and more troubling—picture of these experiments and what they reveal about us.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mayoral Campaign Ads; Egypt Latest; Left-Brain/Right-Brain

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

With the primary three weeks away, voters are seeing more and more campaign ads and flyers from the mayoral contenders. We take your calls on how the candidates' messages are impacting your decision. Plus: Time's Bobby Ghosh on Egypt; City Council Member Brad Lander on unequal treatment of affordable housing tenants in luxury buildings; a new study debunks the idea of left-brain and right-brain behavior; and the words and phrases that the Chinese government blocks on the social media site Weibo.

→ Reminder: Reddit AMA with Errol Louis at 2pm Today! Will be live at this link a little before 2.

The Brian Lehrer Show

How to Outsmart Your Own Mind

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

After exploring self-delusion in his book and blog "You Are Not So Smart," David McRaney, journalist and self-described "psychology nerd," focuses on how to get past ourselves and outsmart our own minds in You Are Now Less Dumb: How to Conquer Mob Mentality, How to Buy Happiness, and All the Other Ways to Outsmart Yourself.

 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How America’s Obsessives Built a Nation

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Some of the country’s greatest thinkers had obsessive natures, and many of their greatest achievements—from the Declaration of Independence to the invention of the iPhone—have roots in the disappointments and frustrations of early childhood. Joshua Kendall looks at the arc of American history through the lens of compulsive behavior. In his book the America’s Obsessives: The Compulsive Energy that Built a Nation he presents portraits of American icons such as Charles Lindbergh, Steve Jobs, Thomas Jefferson, condiment kingpin H. J. Heinz, slugger Ted Williams, and Estee Lauder, and looks at how they shaped our culture and country.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Southpaw Struggles

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

We all know about scissors, smudge marks, and those awkward desks -- but what makes life in the 21st century hard for left-handed people? Chris McManus, professor of psychology and medical education at the University College London and the author of Right Hand, Left Hand: The Origins of Asymmetry in Brains, Bodies, Atoms and Cultures, talks about the history of lefties, the science behind it and the modern-day inconveniences southpaws face.

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