Streams

 

Psychology

On Being

[Unedited] Jonathan Haidt with Krista Tippett

Thursday, June 12, 2014

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On Being

Ellen Langer — Science of Mindlessness and Mindfulness

Thursday, May 29, 2014

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On Being

[Unedited] Ellen Langer with Krista Tippett

Thursday, May 29, 2014

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The Takeaway

The Psychology Behind the 9/11 Museum

Thursday, May 15, 2014

As the September 11 Memorial Museum opens, The Takeaway talks to a psychologist who consulted with the museum designers on how to create a tribute to a traumatic event that doesn’t exacerbate the feelings of trauma.

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Life of the Law

The Hardest Time: Moms in Prison

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Mother’s Day is the one day of the year we set aside to honor mothers. Some do it with flowers and cards. For women who are in prison and their children who are being raised by grandmothers, aunts or guardians on the outside,

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Morning Edition

You Had Me At Hello: The Science Behind First Impressions

Monday, May 05, 2014

Maybe it's true that you never get a second chance to make a first impression. People are judging your personality from the first word you speak, scientists say. Try it yourself with our quiz.

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Radiolab

For the Love of Numbers

Friday, May 02, 2014

It’s hard to think of anything more rational, more logical and impersonal than a number. But what if we’re all, universally, also deeply attuned to how numbers … feel? Why 2 is warm, 7 is strong and 11 is downright mystical.

 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Deniers, Believers, and the Enemies of Science

Monday, April 21, 2014

While excavating fossils in Australia with a celebrity creationist, journalist Will Storr asked himself a simple question: Why don’t facts work? He set off on a search for people who cling to far-fetched stories, in spite of overwhelming evidence against them. In his new book, The Unpersuadables: Adventures with the Enemies of Science, Storr talks to creationists, tours Holocaust sites with famed denier David Irving and a band of neo-Nazis, experiences “past life regression” hypnosis, and investigates the tragic life and death of a woman who believed her parents were high priests in a baby-eating cult.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Roundtable: God in Our Everyday Lives

Monday, April 21, 2014

Our family meeting continues with a roundtable of thinkers from all types of religious backgrounds on how God connects with our everyday lives. With: Krista Tippett, host of On BeingLisa Anderson, director of women’s multifaith education at Auburn Theological SeminaryMark Epstein, a psychiatrist in private practice in New York City and the author of The Trauma of Everyday Life (Penguin Press, 2013); and Gadadhara Pandit Dasa, monk, lecturer and the first-ever Hindu chaplain for Columbia University, New York University, and Union Theological Seminary, and the author of Urban Monk: Exploring Karma, Consciousness, and the Divine (Conscious Living, LLC, 2013).

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What Influences Us: Gandhi, Stress, and Empathy

Friday, April 18, 2014

Anna Sale fills in for Leonard. On today’s show: Ramachandra Guha talks about the first volume of his biography of Mohandas Gandhi, about Gandhi’s years in London and colonial South Africa. Brigid Schulte looks at why so many of us are overwhelmed by work and life. Robert Sitton discusses the life and work of Iris Barry, who founded the film department at MoMA and was its first curator. And our latest Please Explain is all about empathy.

The Leonard Lopate Show

I Feel Your Pain: All About Empathy

Friday, April 18, 2014

Psychologist Paul Bloom and Leslie Jamison, author of The Empathy Exams, explain empathy's role in human psychology, behavior, and relationships—and they look at some of the downsides of empathy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What Are Animals Thinking?

Monday, April 07, 2014

The science of animal cognition shows us how much our furry friends understand the world around them - from highly developed problem-solving abilities, communication styles and emotions.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Using Your Personal Data to Change the World

Thursday, April 03, 2014

John Havens highlights the benefits of an examined life in the digital world and illustrates how the fruits of the Information Age can improve our lives for the better. Our digital identity is represented by gigabytes of data produced from tracking your activities on your smartphone and computer, and in Hacking Happiness: Why Your Personal Data Counts and How Tracking it Can Change the World, Havens argues that emerging technologies will help us use this valuable data to help us track our emotions to improve our well-being based on the science of positive psychology. 

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TRBQ: The Really Big Questions

Why Do We Share?

Friday, March 14, 2014

Are humans basically selfish, or basically giving? That's the question up for debate in this second episode of the six-part series The Really Big Questions. Host Dean Olsher explores how and why humans gravitate towards doing good deeds. He'll also get answers on why some people believe we have been shaped by evolution to care about each other, to share, and to cooperate.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Hypnosis

Friday, February 28, 2014

"We are in trances – every single one of us – every single day."

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Radiolab

The Golden Rule

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

At first glance, Golden Balls was just like all the other game shows—quick-witted host, flashy set, suspenseful music. But underneath all that, each episode asked a very serious question: can you ever really trust another person? Executive producer Andy Rowe explains how the show used a whole lot of money ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Japanese War Crimes Suspect and an Unsolved Mystery from World War II

Thursday, February 13, 2014

In the wake of World War II, the Allied forces charged 28 Japanese men with crimes against humanity. Eric Jaffe tells the story of one of the accused, a civilian named Okawa Shumei. On the first day of the Tokyo trial, he made headlines around the world by slapping star defendant and wartime prime minister Tojo Hideki on the head. Had Okawa lost his sanity? Or was he faking madness to avoid a grim punishment? Jaffee tells the story in his book A Curious Madness

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The Takeaway

Turns Out Humans Only Feel Four Basic Emotions

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Conventional scientific understanding holds that there are only six classic emotions: Happy, surprised, afraid, disgusted, angry, and sad. That is until now. A new study finds that, in fact, we don't even have six emotions—but only four "basic" emotions: Happy, sad, afraid/surprised, and angry/disgusted. Dr. Rachael Jack of the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of Glasgow, is one of the scientists behind this new finding. She joins The Takeaway to explain how we categorize emotions.

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New Tech City

For a Better Memory, Hit 'Delete'

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Keep forgetting your mother's cell phone number? Don't worry. You're not alone. In this New Tech City interview, Columbia University Psychology professor Betsy Sparrow explains why it's so hard to remember things in the digital age and what you can do about it. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Are Babies Born Good or Evil?

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Philosophers and psychologists have long believed that we begin life as blank moral slates, but Paul Bloom argues that we have a deep sense of good and evil when we’re born. In Just Babies The Origins of Good and Evil, he draws on groundbreaking research at Yale, he demonstrates that babies have a rudimentary sense of justice before they can talk. He also examines the morality of chimpanzees, violent psychopaths, religious extremists, and Ivy League professors, and explores our often puzzling moral feelings about sex, politics, religion, and race.

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