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Psychology

The Brian Lehrer Show

On Display

Friday, November 13, 2009

New York Times reporter Julie Scelfo, who wrote about New Yorkers’ window-gazing ways, explores the inevitable voyeurism/exhibitionism of city living and the relationships that sometimes result.

Tell us your window-watching story! What's the strangest thing you've ever seen through a window? Do you have an ongoing window-watching ...

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The Takeaway

Multiple Deployments' Toll on Military Families

Monday, November 09, 2009

The stress of multiple deployments is taking its toll on many military families. In the aftermath of the shootings at Fort Hood, where hundreds of children live, and as we approach Veterans Day later this week, we look at the stress military families live with every day. Lucianne Buch's husband recently retired from the Army after three deployments; her 11-year-old stepson began showing the effects of stress on the day his father was first deployed.  She says multiple deployments are trying on her family and many others at Fort Polk, Louisiana. New York Times Motherlode writer Lisa Belkin also joins us, along with Angela Huebner, a professor of Human Development in the Child and Family program at Virginia Tech, who says that this kind of stress is resting heavily on military families across the country.

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The Takeaway

Military Stress in the Wake of Fort Hood Shootings

Friday, November 06, 2009

Army psychiatrist Major Nidal Malik Hasan is in custody in the hospital after allegedly opening fire on the Army base in Fort Hood, Texas. He killed 13 of his fellow soldiers and injured at least 30 others. The reasons behind the attack are still unknown, but the tragedy will undoubtedly have a lasting affect on the families stationed at Fort Hood.

We speak to Olga Peña, managing editor of the Killeen Daily Herald, for local reactions to the shooting. Andrew Pomerantz, associate professor psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School, who works with soldiers recovering from post-traumatic stress, also joins us, along with Angela Huebner, associate professor in the Department of Human Development's Marriage and Family program at Virginia Tech. The three discuss the psychological effects of stress on military personnel and their families.

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The Takeaway

The Psychology of Stress

Friday, November 06, 2009

Angela Huebner is an associate professor in the Department of Human Development's Marriage and Family program at Virginia Tech. She just completed a study on multiple deployments and the affect on military families. As an expert on stress in the military, she talks about how stress can affect both families and military psychiatrists.

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The Takeaway

Psychological and Religious Reactions to Fort Hood Shootings

Friday, November 06, 2009

As the nation learns the details of the shooting on the Army base in Fort Hood, Texas, reactions are pouring in. To sort through the reactions we speak with Kate Dailey, health and lifestyle editor for Newsweek.com; our own Ibrahim Abdul-Matin on local Muslim reaction to the shooting allegedly by a Muslim soldier; and Ibrahim Hooper of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

Here is President Obama's reaction to the tragedy:

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The Takeaway

Press Conference From Fort Hood

Friday, November 06, 2009

A press conference at Fort Hood Army Base in Texas answers some of the questions stemming from yesterday's tragic shooting on the base. Major Nidal Malik Hasan, an army psychiatrist, is suspected of gunning down his colleagues, killing 13 and wounding at least 30. Officials say Hasan walked into a military compound with two guns and opened fire yesterday afternoon. He was shot and is in critical condition. We also speak with Dr. Brian Aldred, the medical director at the Emergency Center at the Seton Hospital near Fort Hood, Texas, about his hospital's response to the tragedy. Finally, we speak with Olga Pena, the managing editor of the Killeen Daily Herald, who has been following this story.

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The Takeaway

Unfolding Details on Fort Hood Shooting

Friday, November 06, 2009

New details are emerging this morning out of Fort Hood, in Texas, where an army psychiatrist has allegedly killed 13 people and injured 31 during a shooting rampage. Major Nidal Malik Hasan is alive but injured after being shot by a civilian officer. We're joined by Ericka Aguilar, KUT reporter in Fort Hood. Matthew Cassese was stationed at Fort Hood in 2007 and 2008. He remembers a base that was safe, but says soldiers were frequently in trouble for drunken driving. We also talk to Detective First Grade Nick Casale, a former director of counterterrorism for New York City's subway system, about what is involved in a complex criminal investigation.

Here is a press conference from yesterday outside of Fort Hood. This clip shows how confusing it can be during a criminal investigation to get the facts straight. Yesterday they thought it was up to three shooters, one of whom died. Today we know it was one shooter, who is alive, but in critical condition:

 

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The Takeaway

Shooting at Fort Hood Stuns Army, Nation

Friday, November 06, 2009

Thirteen people are dead and 31 injured after a soldier went on a shooting spree at Fort Hood in Texas. The Army base was locked down for much of the afternoon as authorities tried to determine the series of events that lead the suspected shooter, Army psychiatrist Major Nadal Malik Hasan, to open fire on his colleagues. Hasan was injured after being shot by another soldier.

To help unravel the story, we talk to Olga Peña, managing editor of the Killeen Daily Herald, who has been covering the story. For a soldier's perspective, we speak with Naveed Ali Shah, a public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army who was stationed at Fort Hood from 2008 to 2009, and whose wife and son are still there. Shah is, himself, Muslim; he joined us from Iraq. We also spoke with Andrew Pomerantz, a professor of psychiatry at Dartmouth University, who has worked with veterans with PTSD for 35 years.

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The Takeaway

Is Video Gaming Good for You?

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Turn off the computer and go outside and play! We've all heard the conventional wisdom that says video games will turn your brain to mush. But a host of new studies show that gaming might actually be good for your health. Researchers at Nottingham University found that playing certain video games could achieve in one hour what eye patches achieve in 400 hours, while researchers at the University of Rochester found that first-person shooter video games improve visual skills by increasing the brain’s capacity to spread attention over a wide range of events. But wait, there's more! The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, N.M., found that Tetris players developed a thicker cortex than those who didn’t play.  And the Nintendo Wii has been helping Parkinson's patients improve balance. So, are video games good for you?

To help answer that question we turn to technology writer Clive Thompson, the blogger for Collision Detection and a frequent contributor to Wired and The New York Times, and The Takeaway's tech contributor Baratunde Thurston, host of "Popular Science's Future Of," a TV show on the Science Channel, to tell us how video gaming has more positive effects than you might think.

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The Takeaway

Anthony Sowell: Portrait of a Serial Killer

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Yesterday, 50-year-old registered sex offender Anthony Sowell was formally charged with murder and rape in Ohio's Cuyahoga County Court. The story of Sowell's arrest and arraignment on charges of killing 11 victims and living with their corpses has stunned Cleveland residents. Dan Moulthrop, host of WCPN's Sound of Ideas, joins us to discuss Cleveland's reactions to their own home-grown serial killer.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Girl Drive

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Do young women in America identify with feminism? Nona Willis Aronowitz, took a cross-country road trip to find the answer and now reports back the thoughts of 200 women in her new book, Girldrive: Criss-Crossing America, Redefining Feminism.

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The Takeaway

The Productivity Boost From Goofing Off at Work

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Employees goofing off and wasting time at work is always a concern for bosses. But Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner says that as the economy tightens, employees are taking on extra responsibilities and that blowing off steam in creative ways can actually help maintain ones overall focus. She tells us why, with David Rock, author of "Your Brain at Work: Strategies for Overcoming Distraction, Regaining Focus and Working Smarter All Day Long." They share some downtime strategies that even your boss would approve of.

"We're taxing a part of the brain that we've never taxed like this before. The prefrontal cortex and our working memory was supposed to be used once in a while. Just ten years ago we didn't use it nearly as much, before email hit the ground in a big way. Now we're trying to focus on very complicated things for hours and hours on end, and our brains aren't really built to do it."
—David Rock, author, on the physiological reasons why taking mental breaks during the workday may be necessary

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WNYC News

Report: Correctional Facilities Lack Adequate Mental Health Services

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

A report on New York's juvenile justice system finds state run correctional facilities are seriously lacking mental health services, even though about 50 percent of the kids in custody have diagnosed mental illnesses. WNYC's Cindy Rodriguez reports:

The report by the Center for New York City ...

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Radiolab

New Baboon

Monday, October 19, 2009

John Horgan examines how Americans seem to have a completely different attitude toward war than we did thirty years ago. He takes us on a stroll through Hoboken, asking strangers one of the great unanswerable questions: "Will humans ever stop fighting wars?" Strangely, everyone seems to know the answer. ...

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Radiolab

New Stu

Monday, October 19, 2009

Stu Rasmussen, of Silverton, Oregon, is an avid metalworker, woodworker, and electrician - and in 2008 became our country's first transgendered mayor. News of his election swept the country, but what was it like at home?

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The Takeaway

Finding Emotional Healing on the Battlefield

Thursday, October 15, 2009

A new program called Operation Proper Exit brings Iraq war veterans back to the battlefields that haunt them. The New York Times foreign correspondent, Rod Nordland, followed a group of eight soldiers as they sought emotional closure after their physical wounds had healed.

For more, read Rod Nordland's article, Wounded Soldiers Return to Iraq, Seeking Solace, in today's New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Barbara Ehrenreich on the Dark Side of Positivity

Thursday, October 15, 2009

For decades, motivational speakers like Tony Robbins have told us that positive thinking can vastly improve our lives. But Barbara Ehrenreich, the writer famous for the 2001 bestseller "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America," thinks they might be wrong. Her new book is called "Bright-Sided: How The Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America," and she tells us why she thinks positive thinking might not be all it’s cracked up to be.

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The Takeaway

Behind the Spin: What Americans Want

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Frank Luntz is a long-time Republican operative: a virtuoso of the focus group, a pollster extraordinaire and a master of message. In his latest book, "What Americans Really Want...Really: The Truth About Our Hopes, Dreams, and Fears," Luntz asks what ordinary Americans want – not from their government, but from life. And the results are a little surprising.

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WNYC News

Teens Struggle With Death of Parents on 9/11

Friday, September 11, 2009

Many children who were young when they lost parents at the World Trade Center are now adolescents – and September 11th is often a reminder that they have even more to deal with, as teen-agers, than most of their peers. Dr. Sudeepta Varma is the ...

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WNYC News

Madoff on How to Fool the SEC

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff tells a colleague how to throw securities investigators off the track, in a newly-released recording of a 2005 phone call. Warren Levinson reports.

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