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Protests

WQXR News

Protests Erupt in Libya, Continue in Region

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

As protests continue to spread in the Middle East, new reports from Libya indicate the beginnings of an uprising in that country.

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The Takeaway

'The Desire for Democracy in Iran is a Longstanding One'

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

The influence of successful protests in Tunisia and Egypt have spread outside of the Arab world in the Middle East. Iran saw thousands take to the streets in protest against its government, with protesters chanting, "death to the dictator." These are the largest demonstrations since 2009, which resulted in the government crushing the opposition. Can the government shut down the latest protests?

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It's A Free Blog

Monday Morning Reality Check: Martial Law, Not Democracy in Egypt

Monday, February 14, 2011

Champions of democracy the world over welcomed the departure of Hosni Mubarak, Friday, with a massive display of joy. Protesters across Cairo savored their victory, and correspondents on TV channels worldwide fought back tears (some, in fact did cry) as they reported the story of a revolution.

I was inspired, instead, to turn to Brother Webster -- as in Webster’s Dictionary, for a little reminder of what all the hoopla was about:

Revolution |n. (pl. s)(Origin Latin revolutio.) a fundamental change in power that takes place in a relatively short period of time.

Given this definition – “a fundamental change in power” perhaps the celebration is a bit premature. I hate to be a spoilsport, but I’m fairly confident that military regime is not what the youth of Egypt had in mind over these last three weeks. And “revolutionary change” is certainly not what has come to Egypt – not yet.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Journey Towards Democracy

Monday, February 14, 2011

The will of the people of Egypt prevailed with the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak on Friday. In the wake of his departure the Egyptian military is taking control of the government, with elections to be held in six months. The military dissolved parliament and suspended the constitution. As much as Mubarak's departure is a welcome sight for protesters, there is a growing concern about the military's role in the transition. At the same time, there are longstanding problems that the interim government will have to solve, including ongoing labor strikes, poverty and a tradition of corruption.

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It's A Free Country ®

Live From The Greene Space: Regime Change and its Aftermath

Friday, February 11, 2011

Hear audio above, watch the full video here, and check out the slideshow below.

On Friday, The Brian Lehrer Show and It’s A Free Country called a meeting. The agenda: understanding revolution.  At a live event in the Greene Space, people with first-hand experience of revolution from all over the world gathered with interested audience members for an in-depth conversation about what happens after an uprising. Journalists, academics and policy experts were there to inform and be informed by those with their ears to the ground — and to offer advice to Egyptians in the midst of revolution.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Advice for Egypt

Friday, February 11, 2011

Guests today include: 

As well as Shinasi A. Rama, deputy director of the NYU Alexander Hamilton Center for Political Economy and one of the leaders of the Albanian student movement; Suketu Mehta, New York City-based journalist, professor of journalism at NYU, and author of Maximum City: Bombay Lost and FoundNeferti Tadiar, professor and chair of women's studies at Barnard College; Anne Nelson, adjunct associate professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University who's covered revolutions as a journalist in Central America; Omar Cheta, PhD candidate in the departments of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and History at NYU; Shiva Sarram, who was eight years old during the 1979 revolution in Iran and the founder of the Blossom Hill Foundation, which works with children affected by conflict.; Gladys Carbo-Flower, recording artist and witness to Cuba's revolution; Didi Ogude, a recent NYU graduate who was ten years old during South Africa's regime change in the nineties; Hesham El-Meligy, a Muslim-American community organizer from Staten Island; and Ali Al Sayed, Egyptian New Yorker and owner of Kabab Café in Little Egypt, Astoria, Queens.


WNYC News

Look | In Little Egypt, Queens Residents Flood the Streets

Thursday, February 10, 2011

PHOTOS. New Yorkers living in Little Egypt, a community in Astoria, Queens, kept a close watch on Egypt as events unfolded in Cairo.

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WQXR News

Demonstrations in Egypt Enter a Third Week

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Thousands of protestors continued to crowd Cairo during the third week of protests in Egypt, refusing to cease their demonstrations until President Hosni Mubarak resigns. Thousands are also striking, ramping up their demonstrations against the government.

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The Takeaway

As Protests Continue in Egypt, a Look at Democracy in Southeast Asia

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

It’s day 16 of protests in Egypt and demonstrators say they won’t let up until President Hosni Mubarak steps down. Ultimately, the activists on the streets are demanding free and fair elections and a commitment to a democratic government. We’ve talked in depth about the intersection of democracy and Islam in the Middle East, and the challenges of trying to blend the two ideals. But in Southeast Asia, Muslim nations like Indonesia and Malaysia have relatively successful democracies. What makes democracy in those populous Muslim countries work?

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, February 07, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on the protests in Egypt and what's next for the U.S. Congress.

The Takeaway

Mideast Protests and President Bush's 'Freedom Agenda'

Monday, February 07, 2011

As political unrest spreads across the Middle East, analysts here in the United States wonder whether and how U.S. policy has influenced the protestors. How does the U.S.’s increasing role in the Middle East since 9/11 — in Afghanistan, Iraq and in the Israel-Palestine conflict — relate to the current political instability in the reigon?

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The Takeaway

How Can Egypt Ensure a Peaceful Political Transition?

Monday, February 07, 2011

After fourteen days of protests, Egypt's President Mubarak claims that change is coming to his country, noting that Vice President Omar Suleiman met with opposition leaders yesterday. However, protesters dismiss the president’s claims; they want immediate action and have promised that demonstrations will continue until Mubarak steps down and the country reforms its one-party political system. How can Egyptians ensure a peaceful political transition? How has the political unrest in Egypt affected the Middle East as a whole? 

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The Takeaway

Assessing Syria: Desire for Change?

Friday, February 04, 2011

We've seen a domino effect in the Mideast as protests in Tunisia sparked the continued unrest in Egypt. Over the past week opposition activists in Syria have gathered in small groups to pay homage to the protestors in Egypt, while a Facebook group, run mostly by Syrian expatriates, is trying to organize a "Day of Rage" in that country.

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The Takeaway

Arab-Americans Reflect on Week of Protests

Friday, February 04, 2011

Political demonstrations have swept across the Middle East this week, with protestors taking to the streets in Egypt, Yemen and Syria. In Yemen, the protests was hailed as the "day of rage;" in Syria it's being called the "day of anger;" and today in Egypt, protesters are calling for a "day of departure."

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Egypt’s demonstrators undaunted

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Egypt’s demonstrators undaunted

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The Takeaway

Amid Political Turmoil in Arab World, Yemen's President Pledges to Step Down in 2013

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Following massive protests in Egypt and Tunisia, longtime president of Yemen, Ali Abdullah Saleh, announced he would not seek re-election in 2013. He also pledged that he his son would not be his successor. The concessions come ahead of planned anti-government protests in Yemen today.

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WNYC News

A Frantic Phone Call From Egypt and a Feeling of Helplessness

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

Jersey City elementary school teacher Aliaa Gouda woke at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday and found she had missed 10 calls from Egypt.

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It's A Free Country ®

What's Beyond Egypt?

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

WNYC
I'm hearing it from a number of people that there's is great rage and frustration that Gamal Mubarak is the one that, even more than his father, who's looked at as the one who engineered the electoral fraud in the last election...Gamal Mubarak has been refusing to resign his position in the NDP [National Democratic Party]...I think people should be talking about Gamal and expecting Gamal to come out and resign his post and position.

Steve Clemons, director of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, on the Brian Lehrer Show

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The Takeaway

Israel Eyes Events in Egypt Closely

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

As Egypt changes, the country's relationship with Israel becomes fragile. With President Hosni Mubarak pledging not to seek re-election in September, Israeli leaders are worried Egypt could fall into the hands of radical Islamic groups. This includes a fear that the Muslim Brotherhood may emerge as the leadership in the country.

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The Takeaway

What We Are Seeing: Army vs. Police

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Thousands of people have been demonstrating in the streets of Egypt for more than a week, and the army has backed them all the way. That's in stark contrast to the protesters' relationship with the police which has been strained for the past few decades of President Mubarak's regime.

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