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The Takeaway

Middle East News Roundup: Bahrain, Morocco, Syria

Friday, April 29, 2011

It's been another tumultuous week in the Middle East. Another Day of Rage is planned today in Syria, and European governments are meeting to discuss possible sanctions. Meanwhile, human rights activists claim that the four anti-government protesters in Bahrain—who were sentenced to death on Thursday over the killing of two policemen—did not receive a fair trial. And in Morocco, at least fifteen people were killed and more were injured after a suicide bomber attack in a popular restaurant. Shibley Telhami, Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland, speaks with us about the news coming out of the Middle East.

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The Takeaway

Response to Quran Burning in Florida: Protest and Dozens Dead in Afghanistan

Monday, April 04, 2011

The burning of a Quran at a Florida church has set off a wave of violence in Afghanistan. Thousands of protesters mobbed the United Nations building in Mazar-i-Sharif on Friday. Seven U.N. workers were murdered, and protests against the United States raged in Kandahar over the weekend, killing dozens. President Obama and General David Petraeus condemned the Florida pastor’s actions. Including the U.N. workers, 24 people have died since protests began last Friday.

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WNYC News

State Legislature Passes On-Time Budget Amid Protests

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Lawmakers passed a budget in the early morning hours amid loud but peaceful protests. The $132.5 billion budget contains a 2 percent spending cut and eliminates $10 billion, with historic cuts to schools, public colleges, social service programs and health care.

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The Takeaway

Syria: The Newest Member to Arab World Unrest

Monday, March 28, 2011

Syria is the latest in a list of countries like Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya, as disenfranchised citizens in that country have gone to the streets in recent weeks, to protest President Bashar al-Assad's eleven-year reign. The protests have been met with violence; dozens have been reportedly killed by security forces. In response to the protests, the government has repeatedly suggested it may lift the country's emergency law — which allows the leadership to arrest without cause or warrant among other powers — as a concession to protesters. But many are already calling it a bluff. 

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WNYC News

NY Lawmakers Seek Protections at Military Funerals

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Demonstrators at military funerals in New York could face new guidelines under a measure currently before the legislature. State Senator Lee Zeldin and Assemblyman Dean Murray drafted the Specialist Thomas Wilwerth Military Dignity Act, which they said would create a larger buffer zone — between 500 and 2,500 feet — between mourners and protesters at military services.

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The Takeaway

Why a No-Fly Zone Could Undermine the Opposition in Libya

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

As protests in Libya advance to wrestle power away from Moammar Gadhafi, attacks on demonstrators from helicopters and planes also continue. This has the international community left pondering what it can do. Many lawmakers are calling for a no-fly zone to be declared in Libya, but that may be easier said then done. To help us learn what exactly is a "no-fly zone," and if it actually works, is Joshua Keating, associate editor for Foreign Policy.

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It's A Free Country ®

From Libya to Washington

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

WNYC
Always what's shocking in polls is when people admit what they haven't heard of. In the course of watching what's going on in Egypt, Lybia, Tunisia, all the other places in recent times, I've been astounded by the poll numbers of people who say they have only barely heard that there is something going on.

David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

China's Phantom Revolution

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

A call to action went out over social networks in China, urging protests in cities across the country. China also suffers from corruption, inflation and authoritarian rule, but the government seems to have effectively squelched any potential uprising. Officials have threatened potential protesters and filled city squares with police and security agents. Correspondent for The New York Times, Andrew Jacobs is in Beijing, where, he says, the country's security apparatus has been effective in quieting the protesters.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, February 28, 2011

NYT's David Sanger discusses the continued revolts in Libya and whether the pro-democracy movements could spread to North Korea.

The Takeaway

Why Protests Succeed

Friday, February 25, 2011

On January 25th, a young generation of Egyptians assembled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Their calls for a Democratic form of government sparked a wave of protests that toppled the nearly 30-year rule of Hosni Mubarak's regime. The effect of those public demonstrations is still being felt as waves of protests continue to spread across the Arab world. But why have these protests been so successful?

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It's A Free Country ®

What Are the Prospects for Democracy in Libya?

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

WNYC
All the western powers and Clinton and Obama have is, at this point, very weak power of talk, of rhetoric. They will make noises and they will condemn and they will say that's too bad, and they're right, it is terrible and it ought to be stopped. But we live in a world where it's impossible to intervene in the internal affairs, even when a revolution is going on, without inviting the charge of imperialism and colonialism.

Benjamin Barber, political theorist and Distinguished Fellow at the policy center Demos, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Country ®

Comments Roundup: Your Take on the Budget Battles

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

Ever since Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's budget bill was revealed in Madison earlier this month, protesters have had their say. Now you have yours.

The bill limits the ability of public sector unions to collectively bargain, increases required health insurance and pension contributions from government workers, and grants authorities the right to terminate any employees who participate in strikes or walkouts during a governor-declared state of emergency.

Here's what you had to say about the protests in Wisconsin and the controversial cuts on the chopping block.

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It's A Free Country ®

As Wisconsin Bickering Continues, a Real Compromise Languishes

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

Democrats in the legislature have literally abandoned their posts, and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has signaled he is not interested in any compromise whatsoever.

Doctors (who should lose their licenses for this) are giving hypocritical teachers fake doctor's notes so they can abandon their posts, left wingnuts are calling Walker a Nazi, right wingnuts are responding with their own brand of insanity and a whole hell of a lot of nothing but empty grandstanding is getting done.

And while the political hacks vie for air time on MSNBC and Fox News, a real compromise has been on the table this whole time, waiting for any major politician to take notice.

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The Takeaway

Human Rights Watch on Libya

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Protests in Libya to overthrow Muammar Gadhafi and his government continue, and unlike Tunisia and Egypt, it's a far bloodier crisis. The number dead is said to be in the hundreds and Gadhafi is not going to go quietly; he has waged all out war against his people. However, the people are continuing their fight. For more on what's happening in Libya is Joe Stork, deputy director of the Middle East Division for Human Rights Watch. He explains how Human Rights Watch gathers information from such a complicated and violent situation.

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It's A Free Country ®

Comments Roundup: Voices of Arab New Yorkers

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

On the Brian Lehrer Show today, North African and Middle Eastern New Yorkers called in with thoughts and feelings about the uprisings raging across the region. Plus, Debbie Almontaser, an educator and board chair of the Muslim Consultative Network whose brother lives in Yemen, discussed her views on what's happening in the Middle East.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, February 21, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on continuing protests in Bahrain and Libya, plus the U.S. budget troubles.

The Takeaway

Could China See a 'Jasmine Revolution'?

Monday, February 21, 2011

Inspired by the protests in Tunisia and Egypt, Chinese demonstrators put out a call for protests over Chinese social media. Small gatherings popped up in Shanghai and Beijing. However, police shut down the protests quickly, and rounded up dissidents in the days prior to the scheduled protests. Some say these roundups show how worried the Chinese government is. Chris Hogg, reporter for the BBC, is in Shanghai.

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WQXR News

Bahrain Clamps Down on Protests in Manama

Friday, February 18, 2011

Bahrain has taken its strongest action yet to clamp down on continuing protests in the country.

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The Takeaway

An Update from the West Bank

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Protests are under way in Ramallah, where protesters are demanding unity from their leaders. On Monday, the Palestinian Cabinet submitted its resignation and President Mahmoud Abbas asked rime Minister Salam Fayyad to form a new government. BBC reporter Jon Donnison, provides a view of what is happening on the ground in the strip of Palestinian territory.

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The Takeaway

Civil Unrest Reaches Libya

Thursday, February 17, 2011

The wave of anti-establishment, pro-democracy demonstrations made its way to Libya on Friday as several cities saw demonstrations against its leader Colonel Muammer Qaddafi. Taking cues from Egypt and Tunisia, Libyans hope to use social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook to mobilize the popular support necessary to topple Qaddafi’s nearly forty-year regime. For their part, Libya’s state run media did not report the domestic uprisings, focusing instead on pro Qaddafi rallies in Tripoli and other cities. Do Libyan protesters have a chance to make a change? 

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