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Protest

The Takeaway

U.S. and Chinese Presidents Meet, When the C.I.A. Gets Too Cozy with Hollywood, Guantanamo Bay Hunger Strike Drags On

Friday, June 07, 2013

What Can the NSA do with Our Cell Phone and Internet Data? | U.S. and Chinese Presidents Meet in California | The Latest Unemployment Report and What it Reveals About Our Economic Recovery | Guantanamo Bay Hunger Strike Drags into its 5th Month | IRA Hunger Strike Participant Reflects on What it's Like to Strike | When the C.I.A. Gets Too Cozy with Hollywood | New Movie Releases: "The Internship," "The Purge," "Much Ado Ado About Nothing"

 

The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Turkish Listeners on the Protests in Istanbul and Beyond

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Protests and clashes with police in Turkey are making headlines around the world. If you have ties to Turkey, tell us what you're hearing from friends and family and what you understand as the big issues in the demonstrations. How much is the issue the balance between a religious and a secular state? Why did a rally over a park turn into a larger protest? Plus, Steve Coll of The New Yorker joins to talk about the larger context of what happening in Turkey.

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The Takeaway

Anti-Government Protests Erupt in Turkey

Monday, June 03, 2013

Tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of Turkey in protest. So far, more than seventeen hundred people have been arrested. The protests began over government plans to build a shopping mall on Istanbul's Taksim Park, but they have grown into a more comprehensive rejection of what demonstrators say is the Prime Minister's dictatorial ambitions. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Response to the Kimani Gray Shooting

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Jumaane Williams, New York City councilmember (D-45) representing Flatbush, East Flatbush, Flatlands, and Canarsie in Brooklyn, discusses the NYPD shooting of 16-year-old Kimani Gray in Brooklyn and Monday night's protest in response to the incident.

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Transportation Nation

As Critical Mass Turns 20, Founders Reflect on Sprawling Bike Protests (AUDIO)

Friday, September 28, 2012

(San Francisco, Calif. --Ben Trefny, KALW) Political movements don't have to be shaped by politicians. In fact, one of the most dynamic movements to shape the way we see our streets started with a group of bicycle riders in San Francisco who simply wanted to be seen.

It's a gathering that's come to be known as "Critical Mass." Tonight, hundreds, if not thousands, of cyclists from around the world will come together to take over their city's streets and celebrate the event's 20th anniversary.

The Mass has taken place on the last Friday of every month since September of 1992. It's a leaderless bike ride, without a preplanned route, lasting several hours. The concept is to have enough people riding on bikes -- a critical mass -- to force cars to stop and wait for them. The message: The road belongs to bikes too, not just cars.

Critical Mass rides are controversial, somewhat chaotic, and sometimes confrontational. But it's also effective. And it's grown. Today, Critical Mass rides take place in more than 300 countries around the world. Urban bike riding has changed significantly in that time -- some would say Critical Mass helped the world spin a little differently.

Chris Carlsson is the co-founder of Critical Mass. He and Lisa-Ruth Elliot co-edited the new book, Shift Happens: Critical Mass at 20. KALW's Ben Trefny spoke with the two editors to reflect on how the Mass got its start.

CARLSSON: We felt really mistreated, as second-class citizens on the roads... people would treat you derisively, they'd yell at you, they'd think you were, like, immature, you're a kid.  "Grow up and get a car!"  As though that were somehow an act of maturity.  So we thought, let's just meet at the foot of Market Street and ride home together.  Simple act.  Get everybody together we can, fill the streets with bikes, and by doing so, displace the cars.

Listen to the complete interview:

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Spinning on Air

Nora York: Power/Play

Sunday, March 04, 2012

 

"Power/Play" is a musical kaleidoscope of culture and politics; a powerful and playful collage of references and insights; a revealing re-mix of the familiar and the new. New York-based composer and singer Nora York began work on "Power/Play" soon after Congress passed the bipartisan resolution authorizing President Bush to use military force in 2002. With verses from Bob Dylan’s 1963 song "Masters of War" as its centerpiece and leitmotif, "Power/Play" deconstructs and re-imagines established musical masterworks by John Coltrane, Jimi Hendrix, Stephen Foster and many others, adds in songs by York herself, and weaves it all into a compelling narrative about Americans at war and work. 
David Garland presents an hour of highlights from "Power/Play," radio being a very effective medium for York's art. Coming up on Friday, March 9th, Nora York and her ensemble will perform the complete "Power/Play" in a free concert at the Brooklyn Academy of Music's BAM Cafe.

 

With verses from Bob Dylan’s 1963 song "Masters of War" as its centerpiece and leitmotif, Nora York's "Power/Play" deconstructs and re-imagines established musical masterworks by John Coltrane, Jimi Hendrix, Stephen Foster and many others, adds in songs by York herself, and weaves it all into a compelling narrative about Americans at war and work. David Garland presents an hour of highlights from "Power/Play." Nora York will perform the complete "Power/Play" in a free concert at BAM Cafe, Friday, March 9th.

 

 

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

What next for Vladimir Putin?

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

What next for Vladimir Putin?

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WNYC News

Muslim Groups Protest NYPD Practices

Friday, February 03, 2012

Several Muslim and interfaith groups demonstrated at Foley Square in Lower Manhattan Friday to call for more police oversight and protest against what they say are discriminatory practices in the department.

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The Takeaway

Arab League Mission Ends in Syria Amid Bloodshed

Thursday, January 19, 2012

It was a controversial mission from the beginning, the nation of Syria was resistant from the get go, the President of Syria even openly criticized it while it was going on but the Arab League observer mission in Syria comes to an end this weekend. That doesn't mean the League monitors are leaving the country. The head of the mission is due to present his report to the League this weekend and their mandate could be extended.

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The Takeaway

Reddit Co-Founder Alexis Ohanian on SOPA Shutdown

Thursday, January 19, 2012

More than 7,000 websites shut themselves down on Wednesday in a one-day protest of the anti-piracy bills now in Congress. The blackout has some U.S. lawmakers thinking twice about voting for the bills. The Protect IP Act, or PIPA, lost support from two former co-sponsors, Republican Senators Marco Rubio and John Cornyn. Reddit.com's co-founder, Alexis Ohanian, talks about why his website joined in on the blackout and if he thinks it was a success.

 

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Transportation Nation

VIDEO: How the Dutch Got Their Bike Paths

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

(Photo via Flickr user Amsterdamized -- where many more Dutch bike pics are posted)

The Netherlands are lauded the world over as a biking success story -- but as this documentary shows, it wasn't always that way. In fact, the model cycling culture that exists there today is the product of a protest movement to revive a historical bike legacy that had been lost.

In the early 1900s, bike use was so common that bike infrastructure wasn't needed because there were more bikes than cars.

"After World War II everything changed," the documentary explains. As the country grew in wealth, the Dutch could afford cars in record numbers, clogging old cities not designed for automobiles.  Buildings were torn down to make way, and "city squares were turned into car parks." The daily travel distance went from 2.9 miles in 1957 to 14.2 miles in 1975. The car took over.

A rash of children on bikes being hit by cars led to the protest movement in the early 1970s just as the oil crisis hit. The government began a concerted and creative push to remake city centers for pedestrians and bikes.

Watch the video for the rest of the details, and story of the protests:

An October post by Mark Wagenbuur on bike blog Hembrow has more history as well.

(Via Brainpickings)

 

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The Takeaway

Protests and Violence Paralyze Nigeria

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

An estimated 10,000 people participated in the first day of an indefinite strike against the government on Monday. These protests were motivated by alleged corruption and the elimination of a subsidy that has sent fuel prices skyrocketing in Nigeria. Meanwhile, terrorist attacks by the radical Islamist group Boko Haram, who most recently claimed responsibility for a Christmas Day church bombing that killed 37 people and wounded 57, have reached a fever pitch.

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Schoolbook

At Regents Meeting, a Protest Over School Improvement Grants

Monday, January 09, 2012

While the Board of Regents met inside the state’s Education Department headquarters on Monday, representatives from the state’s teachers’ union and several of the districts that lost their funding protested outside, decrying the decision by the commissioner, John B. King Jr., to suspend payments on what are known as school improvement grants.

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Schoolbook

Rally Against Bronx Science Principal, This Time By Students and Alumni

Thursday, January 05, 2012

About two dozen current students and recent alumni gathered on the field across from the entrance to the Bronx High School of Science to protest the school's high rate of teacher turnover and what they perceive as a marked shift in the quality of classroom instruction.

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The Takeaway

Controversial Changes and Protest in Hungary

Thursday, January 05, 2012

It's been a controversial start to the new year in Hungary. The turn of the year meant changes to the country's constitution, changes that some say are incompatible with Hungary's membership in the European Union. Tens of thousands of people are protesting the new constitution, and the EU is contemplating sanctions against Budapest. BBC correspondent Nick Thorpe reports.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Occupy Movement Stuck in Second Gear

Monday, January 02, 2012

Regardless of where the Occupy movement decides to fall on issues, and even if it got well-organized overnight, remaining a protest movement that does not mobilize toward electing friendly politicians or enacting friendly legislation will get them nowhere.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Occupy Albany Demands

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Matthew Edge, a Political Strategy Working Group member of Occupy Albany, discusses their formal demands and how they plan to achieve them, after two months of occupying Albany. 

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The Takeaway

One Reporter Looks Back at His Year in the Arab Spring

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

On December 17, 2010, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in protest of his treatment at the hands of municipal officials. His act of desperation would become the catalyst for a full-scale revolution that would sweep across North Africa and into the Middle East in what would become known as the Arab Spring. This week has brought more violent clashes between protesters and police in Egypt, but the idea of such actions transpiring just a year ago would have been unfathomable. The year 2011 has seen democratic movements swell in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Syria.

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The Takeaway

Time Magazine Names 'The Protester' as Person of the Year

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Time magazine has declared 2011 the year of the protester. In the year that gave the world the Arab Spring, austerity-related uprisings throughout Europe, and the Occupy Wall Street movement, it is no surprise the newsweekly chose "The Protester" as its iconic 2011 Person of the Year. Two protesters from very different movements join The Takeaway to talk about the popular uprisings that have dominated headlines and captivated minds around the globe in 2011.

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The Takeaway

Occupy Our Homes Spreads Throughout the Country

Thursday, December 08, 2011

The impact of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations around the country is difficult to see in raw numbers. But the way in which the national discourse has been moved, and how individual lives have been changed tells another compelling story of the movement's potential. The families in millions of households across the nation who are fighting to hold onto their homes against banks, authority, and the much reviled "1 percent" may have a powerful new ally. Occupy Our Homes, the latest incarnation of the OWS, is seizing foreclosed homes and claiming them for families in need.

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