Streams

 

Privacy

On The Media

Our Privacy Delusions

Friday, June 14, 2013

We all claim to want privacy online, but that desire is rarely reflected in our online behavior. In a story that originally aired in January, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman looks into the futile attempts we make to protect our digital identities.

Johannes Brahms - Violin Concerto op.77 in D Major

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

European Union Angered by N.S.A. PRISM Program

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

There are now concerns that the N.S.A. PRISM program could complicate talks for a free trade agreement between the E.U. and the U.S. Talks were expected to be launched next month. The news of the PRISM program has, for some European lawmakers, transformed troubling demands from American businesses for less restrictive data requirements into unacceptable data hoarding by the US government. Sophie in’t Veld, a Dutch member of the European Parliament explains why.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

What Adults Can Learn from Teens About Online Privacy

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

With all the stories we hear about cyber-bullying, teen sexting, and online predators, it’s easy for adults to feel concerned about the young people out there. But the fact is, kids aren’t nearly as naïve as the world paints them to be. A new study by Pew indicates that, while it might look like they’re oblivious to privacy, kids are as good - if not better - than adults at keeping their online privacy in check.

Comment

On The Media

Meet Strongbox

Friday, May 17, 2013

This week, to help insulate journalists and their sources from government surveillance, The New Yorker launched a new service. It’s called Strongbox, and it enables people to send messages and documents to journalists anonymously and untraceably. It was developed from code created by programmers Kevin Poulsen and the late Aaron Swartz. The New Yorker's Nicholas Thompson explains to Bob how it works.

 

Music: John Lurie - Horse Guitar

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Dept. of Justice Probes AP Phone Records

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Caroline Little president and CEO of the Newspaper Association of America discusses the Department of Justice's subpoena of Associated Press phone records as part of a criminal investigation, and what it means for freedom of the press.

Comments [12]

On The Media

Joel Simkhai, Grindr-in-Chief

Friday, April 12, 2013

Brooke talks to Grindr founder Joel Simkhai about what inspired the app and how it manages to make money.

Comments [2]

On The Media

A Casual, Anonymous Interview

Friday, April 12, 2013

OTM producer Doug Anderson fires up Grindr and meets up with another guy for a casual, anonymous...interview.

Fred Astaire - I'm Putting All My Eggs In One Basket

Comments [2]

On The Media

Meet Grindr: A Gaydar in Every Pocket

Friday, April 12, 2013

Grindr is a phone app that allows gay men to find other users based on their proximity. Brooke speaks with Jaime Woo, author of Meet Grindr: How One App changed the Way We Connect about the app's effect on our understanding of privacy.

Comments [12]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Stop-and-Frisk Federal Trial Begins

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Ian Weinstein, professor of law and associate dean for clinical and experiential programs at Fordham University, talks about the details of the Stop and Frisk case, what's at stake, and what we can expect to hear over the coming month during the trial.

Comments [33]

Schoolbook

Parents Worry Over New Online Database of Student Information

Thursday, March 14, 2013

New York is one of eight states providing information to a $100 million database of public school students from kindergarten through high school. In addition to names and addresses, medical info and test scores are included. New York City parents protested the sharing of children's information without their consent.

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Ask a Bioethicist: Privacy and Genetics

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Each week in March, we'll talk about medical ethics with Duke University bioethicist Nita Farahany, who sits on the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. She'll discuss some of the thorniest bioethical conundrums of our day.

Today's topic: Privacy and genetics. We want your suggestions of bioethical questions we should discuss. Ask your question below and we'll tackle as many as we can.

This complete interview originally aired live on March 13, 2013 as part of a month-long series. An edited version was re-aired on August 2, 2013 as part of a special hour of Ask a Bioethicist in a best-of episode of The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [13]

Radiolab

What's That Thing Hanging Outside My Bathroom Window? My Neighbor's Drone

Monday, February 25, 2013

Here's something new, exciting and just a little bit troubling: it's a little robot that you can fly with your phone. It's easy. It's versatile. It's got cameras so you can see and record what's going on in the apartments above you, the houses on your block, in backyards, sports fields. Nice, yes. But what happens to privacy if these things become very popular?

Read More

Comments [1]

On The Media

Facebook's New Social Search

Friday, January 25, 2013

Facebook has introduced a new search tool called social graph search, which lets users search across the Facebook database by users' interests. Privacy advocates aren't pleased with the new feature, arguing that it makes information about users too easy to find. Bob talks to Tom Scott, who has been given early access to the feature and has been publicizing some of his searches. 

Four Tet - 0181

Comments [1]

On The Media

Privacy and Gun Control

Friday, January 11, 2013

On Thursday, Vice President Biden sketched out early hints of what gun control reform might look like. One potential reform concerns something that you might mistakenly assume already exists: a central database of gun transactions in the US, maintained by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. The NRA has blocked all such efforts in the past. New York Times reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg tells Bob why the ATF's record-keeping on gun sales is actually incredibly antiquated. 

Comments [17]

On The Media

Newspaper Publishes a Map Showing Where Gun Owners Live

Friday, January 11, 2013

Following the school massacre in nearby Connecticut, a New York state paper published a map showing the names and addresses of handgun permit owners in its readership area — all except for one county, where local officials have refused to provide the paper with the information. This decision violates explicit New York State law, but has a supporter in New York state Senator Greg Ball, who tells Bob why he's supporting Putnam County officials.

Yo La Tengo - Stupid Things

Comments [15]

The Takeaway

Iran's 'Surgical' Online Censorship

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Iran is beginning to employ an online surveillance tactic known as "surgical censorship" which allows citizens free, though monitored, use of social media. Megan Garber, a staff writer at The Atlantic, explains the advantages techniques like this hold for a dictatorship.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Journal-News Gun Map

Monday, January 07, 2013

It's been two weeks since the Journal-News published gun permit information for Westchester and Rockland counties. Ken Paulson, president of the First Amendment Center at the Newseum and Vanderbilt University, and former editor of USA Today and The Journal-News, discusses the decision. The paper has since received threats, and lawmakers in other states are considering legislation to limit access to gun ownership information.

Comments [50]

On The Media

The Art of Self-Surveillance

Friday, January 04, 2013

In 2002, artist and professor Hasan Elahi spent six months being interrogated off and on by the FBI as a suspected terrorist. In response to this experience, he created Tracking Transience, a website that makes his every move available to the FBI - and everybody else. In a segment that originally aired in November of 2011, Brooke talks to Elahi about the project.

Comments [2]

On The Media

The Privacy Show

Friday, January 04, 2013

A special hour on privacy - license plate readers, national security letters, surveilling yourself so the government doesn't have to, and OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman on just how much we misunderstand our privacy online.

On The Media

The NCTC: Obama's "Pre-Crime Squad"?

Friday, January 04, 2013

Last March, the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) was granted unprecedented power to collect data on ordinary U.S. citizens, data like flight records or lists of casino employees. Critics have likened the NCTC to the "Pre-Crime Squad" in the movie "Minority Report." Wall Street Journal reporter Julia Angwin talks with Bob about this dramatic shift in the intelligence community's power over US citizens.

Comments [2]