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Privacy

New Tech City

When the FBI Knocks: A Techie’s Moment of Truth

Wednesday, October 09, 2013

The recent revelation that companies like Google and Facebook routinely hand over data about users' digital communications to the National Security Agency has many Americans wondering whether everything they do online is being tracked by the government. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

NY AG Subpoenas AirBnB User Info

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

New York-area hosts have received an email from AirBnB letting them know that the New York Attorney General has subpoenaed their personal information. Charlie Herman, Business and Economics Editor for WNYC News, and Matt Chaban of the Daily News explain the legal issues and what hosts can expect.

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On The Media

The Owner of An Encrypted Email Service Says "No" to the FBI (In a tiny, tiny font)

Thursday, October 03, 2013

Yesterday, a federal judge unsealed records from the case of Lavabit, the privacy-first email service used by Edward Snowden, versus the government. It's a compelling read, and it's a rare story because it shows a company refusing to comply with demands to give up a customer's privacy. 

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On The Media

California Bans Revenge Porn

Wednesday, October 02, 2013

Last night, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a bill that makes revenge porn illegal. Typically, attempts by well-meaning lawmakers to legislate the internet don't end well. These laws often end up restricting free speech without actually stopping the activity they're meant to. But if you're going to pass a law like this, California's looks pretty good. 

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On The Media

India's Attempt to ID Every Indian

Friday, September 27, 2013

In a 2009 book called Imagining India, Indian tech billionaire Nandan Nilekani imagined a way to address India’s most vexing problems of corruption, poverty and lack of social services – a unique ID number for every Indian. 4 years later, India has undertaken the biggest ID program in human history. It’s called Aadhaar, and Nilekani oversees it. But trying to register 1.2 billion people, many for the first time, comes with serious privacy and data-collection concerns. OTM reporter Jamie York went to India to speak with Nilekani and lawyer Malavika Jayaram about the risk and reward of identifying every Indian.

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On The Media

My Detainment Story or: How I learned to Stop Feeling Safe in My Own Country and Hate Border Agents*

Friday, September 20, 2013

OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends (all US Citizens) were detained for hours by US CBP on their way home from Canada. No one received an explanation.

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On The Media

What Does the Government Want with LinkedIn's Data?

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Yesterday, LinkedIn's general counsel published a letter to the site's users expressing frustration that the company's not allowed to disclose the number of national security-related data requests it receives each year. 

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On The Media

Warrantless Device Searches at US Borders

Friday, September 13, 2013

There has long been a quiet exception to the constitutional protection against warrantless search and seizure. It happens routinely at every US border, where federal agents are free to confiscate--and copy--contents of hard drives, cell phones, and other electronic data. Bob talks to New York Times contributor Susan Stellin, who broke a story this week with new insights into how the US government exploits the loophole to target journalists, activists and who knows who else.

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On The Media

"We Post Nothing About Our Daughter Online"

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

This morning Slate published an interesting essay by Amy Webb, where she talks about how she and her husband have decided, since their young daughter's birth, to keep all traces of her off the internet.

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Radiolab

How To Disappear When Someone's Spying On You; 'Privacy Wear' Comes To Market

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

A New York design team has just produced an invisibility cloak for your cell phone. Pop it in and no government, no merchants, no friends, no one knows where your phone is. Another design team in Canada says they could do stuff like this — but they won't. Who's right?

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The Takeaway

New Documents Show Sweeping NSA Surveillance of Americans

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Yesterday, U.S. officials released new documents showing that the NSA may have unintentionally collected as many as 56,000 emails from Americans between 2008 and 2011, and private telecommunications providers like AT&T were involved in the data gathering. Siobhan Gorman, the intelligence correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, explains.

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The Takeaway

Mapping Our Digital DNA

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Cesar Hidalgo and a team of researchers at MIT have created a platform for individuals to access their metadata. It’s called “Immersion” and it uses your email’s metadata to create a bubble map of your connections to others, providing a snapshot of our online selves that provide a glimpse into our work lives and personal lives, and test our understanding of privacy.

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WNYC News

NSA Director Defends Surveillance Programs at Cybersecurity Conference

Thursday, August 08, 2013

As the privacy debate continues following revelations about the federal government's surveillance programs, the director of the National Security Agency is defending his organization's tactics.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Glenn Greenwald; The New Pope’s Style; Tennis in Queens

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Public opinion on personal privacy is shifting as more Americans say they are against the NSA’s surveillance techniques. The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald joins the show to talk about the polls and the latest in the NSA surveillance controversy. Plus: Pope Francis recently returned from his first international trip as pope. Church watcher Rocco Palmo analyzes the trip, what Francis said and his more relaxed style; a check-in on the upcoming New Jersey Senate primary; the expansion of tennis at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens; and Najla Said on her search for an identity as the Arab-American daughter of the late intellectual Edward Said. 

The Takeaway

NJ Supreme Court: Warrants Required to Collect Cell Phone Data

Monday, July 22, 2013

It's been more than a month since revelations about the NSA's mass surveillance programs surfaced and it seems that states are pushing back. Last week, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that regardless of federal policy, state law enforcement officers must get a warrant in order to obtain cell phone tracking information. Peter Verniero, a former New Jersey Attorney General and state Supreme Court Justice, and Susan Freiwald, a University of San Francisco Law Professor, explain.

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Slate Culture Gabfest

The Culture Gabfest: Mini Goth Dumbo Edition

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Slate critics Dana Stevens, Julia Turner and Stephen Metcalf discuss the MTV show "Catfish," Frank Rich's column on the NSA and privacy, and Dana's tirade against flip flops.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Privacy in an Age of Publicity

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Jill Lepore traces the history of privacy in America. Her article “The Prism” appears in the June 24 issue of The New Yorker.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Privacy and Big Data

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Emily Steel, the Financial Times' Media and Marketing correspondent, discusses Big Data and the corporate competition to accumulate information about consumers. She looks at new data analytics products and services in today's industry, the future of data broker laws and regulations, and what privacy advocates are doing.

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New Tech City

NSA Surveillance as a Teachable Moment?

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

What can we learn from the NSA's surveillance program? A lot, according to Chris Lawrence, senior director of the Mozilla Mentor Community. He calls the scandal's aftermath "a teachable moment."

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