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Privacy

New Tech City

Getting Feisty Protecting Your Data from Companies

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

The machines are watching us. Computers, phones, hospitals and cars are all collecting data on us to serve us better. But how can we the consumers know when our data is working for us, not against us? 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Privacy and Your Health

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Deborah Estrin is a professor of computer science at Cornell NYC Tech, an open source advocate and the co-founder of the non-profit Open mHealth. She talks about how the data you generate about yourself -- through smartphones, your habits, and even sensors -- can be used to find clues about your health, and what the technology says about our privacy.

Comments [13]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Your Car Knows Your Secrets

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

How would you feel about a car that knows—and stores—everything about you, including how often you speed and whether you’re a seatbelt scofflaw? What if that technology could one day lower your insurance bills?

Comments [69]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Privacy in Our Families

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Mary Madden, senior researcher at the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, talks about how teens engage with privacy online, and how parents and families can navigate digital lives and privacy concerns.

 

Comments [17]

On The Media

Invasive Cavity Search at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

"Jane Doe" is a 54-year old US citizen who was crossing into the US at the Juarez/El Paso border when agents took her aside for secondary screening. The screening ended up being 6 hours of invasive cavity searches—which yielded nothing and left her traumatized. Bob speaks with Laura Schauer Ives, an ACLU attorney for Jane Doe about what happened at the border that day.

Comments [26]

On The Media

My Detainment Story or: How I Learned To Stop Feeling Safe In My Own Country and Hate Border Agents

Friday, February 28, 2014

Back in September, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

Comments [34]

On The Media

Device Searches at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

The border is a legal gray area where the same constitutional protections one expects inside the country don't necessarily apply. When graduate student Pascal Abidor had his electronic devices searched and seized at the border back in 2010, he filed lawsuit against the federal government. But in December, a federal judge upheld the government's right to search travelers' devices at the border without a warrant. Brooke speaks with Pascal about his experience at the border and the lawsuit.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How to Protect Your Personal Data in 10 Not-So-Easy Steps

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Close your LinkedIn account. Unfriend your Facebook friends. Cover your webcam. This was just the start of one woman's attempt to protect her privacy.

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On The Media

A Stranger Can Find Out Where You Are By Getting You To Open An Email

Monday, February 10, 2014

It's not hard to imagine a situation where this plug-in, called Streak, could be badly abused.
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On The Media

4.6 Million Snapchat Accounts Have Leaked And It's Actually Not That Important.

Thursday, January 02, 2014

4.6 million Snapchat usernames and their associated phone numbers were leaked this week.  (If you use the service, there’re a few single serving sites where you can check to see if your information’s out there.)

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On The Media

How much is your privacy worth? About five bucks.

Friday, December 27, 2013

There’s a $16 billion market out there for app developers willing to offer consumers their privacy back.

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On The Media

Journey to the Center of the NSA

Friday, December 20, 2013

Last Sunday's 60 Minutes profile of the NSA was almost universally reviled. But 60 Minutes is not the only outlet that has spent time at the agency's headquarters in Maryland. Brooke talks to Daniel Drezner, who wrote about his trip to the NSA's headquarters and the agency's new PR push for Foreign Policy.

Shigeto - Ringleader

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On The Media

No One Outside the NSA Seems Particularly Happy with the 60 Minutes NSA Story

Monday, December 16, 2013

The piece doesn't include any on camera interviews with critics of the NSA, and interviews with NSA employees were overseen by a team of minders.

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On The Media

Why Facebook Messenger Wants Access To Your Phone's Microphone

Friday, November 29, 2013

There's an Infowars story that's beginning to circulate widely about a seemingly very Orwellian move by Facebook. 

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The Takeaway

C.I.A. Pays AT&T for Big Data

Friday, November 08, 2013

The New York Times has reported that AT&T is selling personal customer information to the C.I.A. for more than $10 million a year. There are no subpoenas or court orders involved. The reason? To assist with overseas counterterrorism investigations. Joining The Takeaway to weigh in is Susan Crawford, a professor at Cardozo Law School and the author of “Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age."

Comments [9]

On The Media

The US Keeps Getting Caught Spying on Allies

Thursday, October 24, 2013

On Monday morning, I wrote that allegations the NSA had intercepted French phone calls weren't actually very important. My logic was that allies spy on each other routinely. When they get caught, there’s a lot of ceremonial outrage and apology that amounts to very little.

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Slate Political Gabfest

The Political Gabfest: "Was That the Alamo or the Battle of the Bulge?" Edition

Friday, October 18, 2013

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring David Plotz, John Dickerson and Emily Bazelon. This week: The why and wherefore of the end of the shutdown. Plus, what Facebook's new policy means for teenagers.

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On The Media

The NSA Probably Has Your Buddy List

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

The Washington Post reports that the NSA harvests the email addresses and contact lists of millions of people globally, many of them Americans. They don't have permission from the email providers to do this, the agency just snatches the data as its transmitted across the world.

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On The Media

Facebook Reduces Its Privacy Options (Again)

Friday, October 11, 2013

Yesterday, Facebook announced that users who've asked for their timelines to be unsearchable will now searchable. 

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New Tech City

QUIZ: Nuclear War? Are These Real Terms of Service

Wednesday, October 09, 2013

WNYC

Every time you sign up for a new online service, you face a choice:  do you click "accept" at the bottom of a long scroll of dense legalese that is the company's terms of service. We decided to whip out the old magnifying glass to get a better look at the fine print and bring you some of the more unexpected gems buried in real terms of service agreements. Can you guess which ones are real? 

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