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Privacy

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Government's Guidelines for Labeling You a Terrorist

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Jeremy Scahill talks about how the Obama Administration has expanded the terrorist screening system and what causes people end up on the watch list.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Finding Quiet in the Open Office

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Do you work in an open space office?  Where do you go when you need a little privacy or quiet?  And are there new rules that go along with the new floor plan?  Call us at 212-433-9692 to share your hacks and strategies for combining collaboration and reflection and still getting along with co-workers.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Government Surveillance Is Making Journalism Harder

Friday, August 01, 2014

U.S. government surveillance is hampering U.S.-based journalists and lawyers in their work and is having a chilling effect on journalists who cover national security, intelligence, and law enforcement, according to Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union. Alex Sinha talks about his report “With ...

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Privacy, circa 2014

Friday, August 01, 2014

Are you okay with your car collecting data on your driving habits if it means a lower insurance rate? What about advertisers online? The Brian Lehrer Show tackles all sorts of privacy conundrums for the modern age. Plus: a debate between "Internet experts" Jaron Lanier and Jeff Jarvis.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Is HIPAA Being Used To Harm - Not Help - Patients?

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

In a recent article for ProPublica, senior reporter Charles Ornstein examines three case studies of medical centers citing HIPAA - the 1996 law mean to protect patients - in ways that protect their own interests and privacy. Ornstein joins us to explain what HIPAA actually covers and explain what your rights are as a patient.

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On The Media

Google Plus Dropped Its Real Name Policy

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Three years after launch, Google Plus users can use (almost) whatever fake name they want.

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On The Media

Online Agitprop! Everyone's Doing It!

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

On the most recent TLDR, I spoke to Max Seddon, foreign correspondent for Buzzfeed, about some recently unearthed documents that show a massive online pro-Russia propaganda effort with ties to The Kremlin

In that interview, Max made it clear that Russia is far from the only government that does this sort of opinion influencing, citing an AP report from a couple months ago about US efforts to sway public opinion in Cuba by creating its own "fake twitter." from the interview:

USAID set up an entire fake social network for cuban people to get around all the internet filters to Cuba that was meant to create some sort of thing that they could use to influence popular opinion in Cuba, which is closed off to the US, and it's very difficult to do well. because On the internet, people are smart, it's very easy to compare things, and use multiple sources of information and come to the right conclusions. They can tell when something is fake.

On Monday, Glenn Greenwald's The Intercept produced another example of this governmental internet meddling, this time from Britain's Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). 

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

US-German relations strained over new spying allegations

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

US-German relations strained over new spying allegations

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On The Media

Do Not Track Declared DOA

Thursday, May 22, 2014

A few years ago, there was a strong initiative to create a "Do Not Track" option on the internet, which would keep advertisers from following you from website to website, watching your every browsing and spending move. The hope was that with a single browser option, consumers could block advertisers from following them around the web. On the Media even did a relatively lengthy look at the initiative as proposed by the FTC in 2010.

three and a half years later, the Do Not Track initiative looks like an ambitious, but spectacular failure.

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The Takeaway

Meet the Senator Who Wants to Reform Mass Surveillance

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Ron Wyden on why he wants legislation to end bulk collection of data. The House is set to vote on such a bill this week.

 

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On The Media

All The Worst People Would Like the Internet To Forget Them

Friday, May 16, 2014

A child pornographer; a disgraced politician; an attempted murderer. These are the first people who've shown up in the wake of an E.U. court ruling, to get information about themselves removed from the internet.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Glenn Greenwald on Edward Snowden and the 'Inept and Menacing' NSA

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Journalist Glenn Greenwald on traveling to Hong Kong to meet Edward Snowden, the scope of NSA's data collection, and why the NSA still doesn't know what documents Snowden took. 

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The Takeaway

Should We Have the 'Right to Be Forgotten' Online?

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Europe's highest court is giving a little bit more power back to the people. On Tuesday, the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg ruled that in some cases, Google must grant users a so-called "right to be forgotten."

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Slate Political Gabfest

The Political Gabfest: The "Go Ahead, Search My OkCupid Profile" Edition

Friday, May 02, 2014

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring John Dickerson, Emily Bazelon, and David Plotz. This week: Race and the NBA with guest Mike Pesca, a botched execution in Oklahoma, and the Supreme Court on searching cell phones.

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The Takeaway

Inside The Secret History of Invisible Ink

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The history of invisible ink is filled with secret messages. Author Kristie Macrakis explains why invisible ink continues to mark the pages of history, fueling torrid affairs, world wars, and every kid's imagination. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Cell Phones and Searches

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

For the police, is your cell phone like a wallet or a safety deposit box? Emily Bazelon, senior editor and court watcher at Slate, Political Gabfest regular and the author of Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy, discusses the cases being argued at the Supreme Court over the issue of whether a search warrant is required for cell phones.

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On The Media

Not-So-Private Metadata

Friday, March 21, 2014

The NSA has defended its controversial surveillance program by arguing that it just collects metadata, and therefore doesn't violate the privacy of individual Americans. But computer scientists at Stanford Security Lab have conducted their own simulation of the NSA's program, and found the metadata to be inherently revealing. Bob speaks with Jonathan Mayer, one of the researchers on the project, about how much can be learned just from the numbers.

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On The Media

Company Starts Offering Anti-Google Glass Recognition Services

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Google Glass has been crazily divisive in San Francisco, where businesses are banning its usage and fights have erupted over people who are wearing it. A company called Reputation Management Consultants says it has found an elegant solution - Anti Glass, a service which will stymie people from using the device to look you up online.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Brian Lehrer Weekend

Saturday, March 08, 2014

Three of our favorite segments from the week, edited together to listen to on the weekend: a privacy debate, Ukraine, and telling the story of disability through film.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Take Our Privacy Conundrums Quiz

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

On Tuesday's Brian Lehrer Show, we're doing a full two-hour show on privacy. Here, some questions about where you draw the line when it comes to trading away your privacy in return for a particular service. We'll take these up -- and more -- on air starting 10am Tuesday. See the results of the survey here.

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