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President Obama

The Takeaway

US-Middle East Policy Enough to Warrant Peace Prize?

Thursday, December 10, 2009

President Obama was in part awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his outreach to the Muslim world. The administration has made Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan top priorities, but some analysts say Obama has  neglected much of the Middle East. We ask Reza Aslan, author and contributing editor to the Daily Beast, and Abderrahim Foukara, the D.C. Bureau Cheif of al-Jazeera, to evaluate the good, the bad and the ugly when it comes to the president's Middle East diplomacy.

 

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The Takeaway

Reacting to President's Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 2009

For reactions to President Obama's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech we speak to Richard Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations, and Charlie Sennott, executive editor of Globalpost.

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The Takeaway

Anticipating President's Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Anticipating President Obama's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech, we speak to Richard Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations and Charlie Sennott, executive editor of Globalpost.

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The Takeaway

President in Oslo to Accept Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 2009

President Obama is in Oslo today where he will accept the Nobel Peace Prize. Both supporters and critics alike have asked whether the President is deserving of this prestigious award only months into his presidency.  Jeff Zeleny of The New York Times, Shuja Nawaz of the Atlantic Council and Steve Cohen of The Earth Institute at Columbia University evaluate the President’s policies – international diplomacy, Middle East outreach and climate change – that won him the award.

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The Takeaway

How the President Made an Afghanistan Strategy

Monday, December 07, 2009

In a front page article published in Sunday's New York Times, Peter Baker details how President Obama came to decide on the new Afghanistan war strategy he delivered to cadets at West Point last week. Baker's article describes a patient, methodical and oftentimes frustrating process which, over the course of three months, led to a policy that may define Obama's presidency.  

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The Takeaway

Couple that Crashed State Dinner Aren't New to Fame Game

Friday, November 27, 2009

The couple that crashed President Obama's first White House dinner, Tarek and Michaele Salahi, managed to slip through several layers of security in order to pose with such Washington luminaries as Vice President Joe Biden and White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emmanuel. The couple aren't new to (fleeting) fame. They're reportedly in the running to be one of the couples on the Bravo reality show, "The Real Housewives of Washington." And the New York Times reports that the Bravo cable TV network followed the couple up to the entrance state dinner. For more on this, we're joined by Brian Stelter, who writes the Media Decoder blog for our partners, The New York Times.

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