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Poverty

The Leonard Lopate Show

Michael Oher Beat the Odds

Monday, February 06, 2012

Michael Oher, the football star made famous in the book and movie The Blind Side, talks about rising above the circumstances of his youth. In I Beat the Odds, Oher looks back on how he went from being a homeless child in Memphis to playing in the NFL, and looks at how he broke out of the cycle of poverty, addiction, and hopelessness that trapped his family.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Paging Mitt Romney: Here are the Holes in the Safety Net

Friday, February 03, 2012

Recap from It's a Free Country.

Welcome to Politics Bites, where every afternoon at It's A Free Country, we bring you the unmissable quotes from the morning's political conversations on WNYC. Today on the Brian Lehrer Show, Mitt Romney says if the safety net for the very poor needs repair, he'll fix it. Melissa Boteach, poverty expert and manager of the Half in Ten Campaign at the Center for American Progress Action Fund, offered suggestions on where to start.

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The Takeaway

Veterans Talk about Poverty

Friday, February 03, 2012

Poverty and homelessness disproportionately effects those who have served in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and National Guard. While the reasons are diverse — the lack of perceived skills by civilian employers, physical and psychological injuries sustained during service, a sluggish economy — the reality is undeniable: veterans make up only ten percent of the population, yet seven percent of veterans live in poverty and one in five are homeless. Of those that have served, the group hardest hit have been National Guard veterans. 

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The Takeaway

The 'Safety Net' and Realities of Poverty

Friday, February 03, 2012

On Tuesday evening following his Floriday primary victory, Mitt Romney told Soledad O'Brien that, "I’m not concerned about the very poor. We have a safety net there. If it needs repair I'll fix it." The following day, The Takeaway followed up with a segment about the changing face of poverty in America. As part of a continuing conversation about this topic, Ron Robinson joins the program. Robinson is a homeless father of twins who lost his job at AT&T in 2010, and has been moving his family in and out of homeless shelters in Detroit, Michigan ever since. Alex Kotlowitz, journalist, author of the book "There Are No Children Here," and producer of "The Interrupters" also addresses the subject. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Haiti: The Aftershock of History

Monday, January 23, 2012

Even before the devastating 2010 earthquake, Haiti was known for its poverty and corruption. Laurent Dubois discusses the maligned and misunderstood nation that has long been blamed by many for its own wretchedness. In Haiti: The Aftershock of History, he shows that Haiti's troubles can only be understood by examining its complex past.

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The Takeaway

Cornel West and Tavis Smiley on Poverty in 2012

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Dr. Cornel West and Tavis Smiley have been outspoken critics of income inequality in America. The late aughts were shaped by the subprime mortgage crisis, subsequent stock market crash, international debt problems, and record levels of long-term unemployment. Between 2006 and 2010, there was a 27 percent increase of people living in poverty across the U.S. And despite signs of recovery, growth has been slow and decidedly uneven with Florida, Nevada, Arizona, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio and California hovering at 12 percent or higher unemployment rates.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Poverty in The Bronx

Wednesday, January 04, 2012

In an article in The Nation, editorial director of Colorlines, Kai Wright, argues that poverty in The Bronx results from policy, not personal choice. 

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Schoolbook

Sometimes You Have to Settle for Just Being There

Monday, January 02, 2012

In her latest blog post, Laura Klein writes: In the past, I dreamed of plucking my students from their miserable homes and finding solutions to their problems. I felt powerful and capable, as though I would be able to offer them something better. Now I know that the best I might do is to just be there when they return from their holiday break, offering them something steady and certain.

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The Takeaway

Revisiting the Living Without Doorknobs Project

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

In September, artist and graphic designer Megan Flood came on The Takeaway to discuss her senior project at the University of Michigan. Through audio and photographs, Living Without Doorknobs documents life in an Ann Arbor, Michigan homeless tent community called Camp Take Notice. One of the homeless men living in Camp Take Notice, Joe Gill, was a major focus of Flood's work, and his photographs of the tent community became an integral part of her project.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Community Organizing and School Reform

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Mark Warren argues that community organizing is key to address the persistent failure of public schooling in low-income communities. A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organizing as a Catalyst for School Reform, written with Karen L. Mapp, is based on a comprehensive national study, the book presents rich and compelling case studies of prominent organizing efforts in Chicago, New York City, Los Angeles, Denver, San Jose, and the Mississippi Delta. He’s joined by Desiree Pilgrim Hunter, board president and leader of the Northwest Bronx Community and Clergy Coalition, one of the organizations profiled in the book.

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The Takeaway

Food Banks Can't Keep Up With Demand

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

It's the day before Thanksgiving and many of us will be spending the day preparing for our holiday feast. But for millions of Americans the tables may be more bare this year. With the economy still weak, and federal and state budgets for charity services cut, many local food banks and food pantries are seeing an increase in demand. But they don't have enough food on their shelves to keep up.

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The Takeaway

Data Show Latinos Hit Hardest by Recession

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

The latest Census data reports that nearly 46.2 million Americans, about 1 in 15, are living in poverty. According to a new Pew poll, the face of American poverty has shifted dramatically. For the first time in U.S. history, the percent of Hispanics living in poverty outpaces African Americans with 28.2 percent of Latinos under the poverty line compared to 25.4 percent of blacks. In fact, Latinos overall were hit the hardest by the Great Recession which technically ended in 2009.

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The Takeaway

Census Bureau Changes Flawed Poverty Metric

Monday, November 07, 2011

When the Census Bureau announced that a record number of Americans live below the poverty line it did so using an old metric that has not been changed, apart from adjustments for inflation, since it was hastily conceived in 1963. Starting Monday, the Census Bureau will use a new metric — taking into account such federal assistance like food stamps and such costs as rent, medical and child care, for the first time.

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The Takeaway

Cornel West and Tavis Smiley on 'The Poverty Tour'

Monday, October 10, 2011

One in six Americans are poor, which means 50 million people are living in poverty in the United States. Dr. Cornel West and Tavis Smiley, hosts of PRI's "Smiley and West," went on "The Poverty Tour: A Call to Conscience," an 18-city tour of the United States in August, to speak with Americans living in poverty and get a sense of what it's like to be poor in America today. This week, PBS will air the first of five episodes of "The Poverty Tour."

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On Being

Wangari Maathai — Planting the Future [remix]

Thursday, September 29, 2011

A remarkable Kenyan woman and environmentalist speaks from experience about the links between ecology, human flourishing, war and peace, and democracy. And she shares her thoughts on where God resides.

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On Being

[Unedited] Wangari Maathai with Krista Tippett

Thursday, September 29, 2011

A remarkable Kenyan woman and environmentalist speaks from experience about the links between ecology, human flourishing, war and peace, and democracy. And she shares her thoughts on where God resides.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Latest from the Census

Friday, September 23, 2011

WNYC reporters, Arun Venugopal and Cindy Rodriguez, talk about what the latest census numbers say about poverty levels and other demographic measurements in New York City and the U.S.

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Schoolbook

Nearly One-Third of City Children Live in Poverty, Census Says

Thursday, September 22, 2011

A new report from the Census Bureau shows that 75,000 city residents were pushed into poverty from 2009 to 2010, increasing the poor population to more than 1.6 million and raising the percentage of New Yorkers living below the official federal poverty line to 20.1 percent, the highest level since 2000. Among the hardest hit: children under age 18, for whom the poverty level rose 2.9 percentage points to 30 percent.

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WNYC News

More City Families Are Falling Into Poverty

Thursday, September 22, 2011

New York City families are making less money, struggling to pay rent and falling into poverty — and, with poverty increasing in all boroughs except Manhattan, nearly a fifth of families on the city are on food stamps. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Follow Up Friday: Poverty Line, Post Office Clause, Food Stamp Eligibility

Friday, September 16, 2011

Poverty expert and manager of the Half in Ten Campaign at the Center for American Progress, Melissa Boteach, follows up on the census report with an explainer on where we place the poverty line. Plus: follow-ups on the post office and food stamps. 

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