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Poverty

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mary Williams, Jane Fonda's Adopted Daughter

Friday, August 30, 2013

Mary Williams talks about being born into the Black Panther movement, being raised amid violence and near-poverty, and being adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda. Her memoir The Lost Daughter is a chronicle of her transformed life, her time working with the Lost Boys of Sudan, and reconnecting with her biological family in Oakland.

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Schoolbook

Wealthy Districts Outpace Poor on State Exams

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Despite test scores going down throughout New York, the gap between rich and poor remains when it comes to student performance.

“The districts that are lower-needs districts significantly outperformed the other districts in the state,” said State Commissioner of Education John King at Wednesday’s press conference in Midtown.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Weekend Bonus: Mobility in America, 2013

Friday, July 26, 2013

This week on the Brian Lehrer Show, we discussed several stories related to economic mobility in the United States, from a new study that shows the links between geography and class; to advice segments on how to survive and escape poverty. This special podcast compiles all of those segments into one file.

Be sure to subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show podcast on iTunes, and tune in every day at 10am on WNYC and WNYC online.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Remaking Detroit

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Detroit-area native Mark Binelli talks about Detroit—it’s long downward spiral and its new role as a laboratory for the future of cities. In Detroit City Is the Place to Be, he goes beyond the usual portrait of crime, poverty, and ruin to show how Detroit is being re-invented as a post-industrial city becoming smaller, less segregated, greener, economically diverse, and better functioning.

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Schoolbook

Summer Meals for NYC Kids Kicks Off

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Department of Education launched this year’s summer meals program which starts Thursday at M.S. 131 in Manhattan’s Chinatown, where Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott said the free meals are key to combatting hunger when school is out.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Cotton Tenants: Three Families by James Agee and Walker Evans

Thursday, June 06, 2013

Novelist Adam Haslett and John Summers, editior-in-chief of The Baffler, talk about a re-discovered masterpiece of reporting by James Agee and celebrated photographer Walker Evans, Cotton Tenants: Three Families. In 1941, James Agee and Walker Evans published Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, about three tenant farming families in Hale County, Alabama, at the height of the Great Depression. They originally traveled there on assignment for Fortune magazine in 1936, but a story that was never published. Fifty years after Agee’s death, his report “Cotton Tenants” was discovered. Published for the first time, it includes 30 of Walker Evans’s historic photos.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Clark on Summer Parties; "Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer"; Cotton Tenants

Thursday, June 06, 2013

New York Times Dining section columnist Melissa Clark shares ideas about what to make for parties and picnics that can stand up to the summer heat. Then we’ll talk to the directors of a new documentary about Pussy Riot, the Russian group whose members were arrested and jailed for performing in a cathedral. We’ll find out about a re-discovered article by James Agee and photographer Walker Evans that was the basis of their celebrated book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.

The Takeaway

How to Fight the Wealth Gap

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Anne Price, Program Director for Closing the Racial Wealth Gap Initiative evaluates a proposal made yesterday on our program by Darrick Hamilton for baby bonds as a policy intervention to help alleviate growing income inequality in the US.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Behind the Kitchen Door

Friday, April 26, 2013

Saru Jayaraman, cofounder and codirector of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United and director of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California, discusses the low wages, poor working conditions, discriminatory labor practices that many restaurant workers across the country endure. Her book Behind the Kitchen Door looks at the working conditions at restaurants and at the people who work there, many of them immigrants and minorities, who live on some of the lowest wages in the country.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Case Study: India

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Jagdish Bhagwati, university professor of economics at Columbia University and senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Arvind Panagariya, professor of economics and Indian political economy at Columbia University and non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institute, talk about the book they co-authored. Why Growth Matters: How Economic Growth in India Reduced Poverty and the Lessons for Other Developing Countries discusses how post-Independence India offers case studies of paths to economic development.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Mary Williams on Being Adopted by Jane Fonda

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Mary Williams talks about being born into the Black Panther movement, being raised amid violence and near-poverty, and being adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda. Her memoir The Lost Daughter is a chronicle of her transformed life, her time working with the Lost Boys of Sudan, and reconnecting with her biological family in Oakland.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Public Defenders and Justice

Thursday, March 28, 2013

The 1963 U.S. Supreme Court decision Gideon v. Wainwright states that all defendants facing significant jail time have the constitutional right to a free attorney if they cannot afford their own. Fifty years later, 80 percent of criminal defendants are served by public defenders. Karen Houppert chronicles the stories of people in all parts of the country who have relied on public defenders in Chasing Gideon: The Elusive Quest for Poor People’s Justice.

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The Takeaway

Investing in Girls' Education in the Developing World

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

A new film explores the lives of 9 young girls from across the developing world. It argues that investing in young girls’ education is the key, not only to enriching their lives, but to eradicating poverty. Richard Robbins is director of "Girl Rising," and Holly Gordon is executive director of 10x10, a global campaign to educate and empower girls.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

2013 Race for Mayor: Low-Income New Yorkers

Friday, March 01, 2013

Brian Lehrer hosted a forum with seven mayoral hopefuls "2013 Race for Mayor: What's in it for Low-Income New Yorkers?" sponsored by The Community Service Society (CSS) sponsored the event in partnership with Local 32BJ of the Service Employees International Union, the Center for Popular Democracy, and United New York. Full audio above.

Hear Excerpts and Analysis of the Forum

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Sequester; Poverty in New York; LIPA; Solo Twin

Friday, March 01, 2013

Slate's Fred Kaplan discusses why the sequester is worse for the military than you might think. Plus: Whether LIPA should be public or private; Verizon coverage post-Sandy; poverty and the Mayor's race; sustainable fashion; and the story of an identical twin lost.

The Brian Lehrer Show

2013 Race for Mayor: Low-Income New Yorkers

Friday, March 01, 2013

Last night, Brian Lehrer moderated a forum of mayoral candidates on their visions for how to help low-income New Yorkers and working families. We'll play extended clips from the "2013 Race for Mayor: What's in it for Low-Income New Yorkers?" event.

 

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaway | February 14, 2013

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Is Preschool the Answer to Poverty? | Flawed Drug Policy Highlights Myths Around Race and Drugs | Six Words: Gay Bar Meeting, True Love Found | Six Words: Love, Loss, Betrayal, Death, Regret, Relief | A Hundred Years After the Armory Show

Schoolbook

Report: Child Well Being Depends on Where You Live

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

A new report on New York City children's progress highlighted the differences in neighborhoods across the city. In Bayside, nearly 80 percent of kids met reading standards in 2011, almost double the citywide average. In Mott Haven, East Tremont and Morris Heights that number plummets; roughly a quarter of kids in those neighborhoods read at grade level.

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Schoolbook

Tackling the Harder Climb to Higher Education

Wednesday, February 06, 2013

The same day the city unveiled a web-based college assistance site, two experts on access to higher education explore some of the issues low-income and first-generation college students face. It's one thing to get into college; it's another to pay for it or make it to graduation.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Whitney Young Provides Depth and Texture to Portrait of Racial Inequality

Friday, February 01, 2013

WNYC

Focused, uncompromising, and yet essentially pragmatic, Whitney Young, executive director of the National Urban League, answers questions at this 1966 meeting of the Overseas Press Club. 

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