Streams

 

Poverty

Freakonomics Radio

Fighting Poverty With Actual Evidence

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

It's time to do away with feel-good stories, gut hunches, and magical thinking.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

A New Look at "The Undeserving Poor"

Monday, November 25, 2013

What causes poverty, and what can we do about it? Michael Katz, author of The Undeserving Poor: America's Enduring Confrontation with Poverty, says our social aid policies are based on the idea of who deserves help, not who needs it.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Iran Deal; 'Undeserving Poor'; Bloomberg's Balanced Budget; Kids Presents

Monday, November 25, 2013

The latest on the Iran nuclear deal with Fred Kaplan of Slate and Julianna Goldman of Bloomberg. WNYC's Brigid Bergin and Andrew Hawkins from Crain's New York Business offer up the latest on the transition from Mayor Bloomberg to Mayor de Blasio. Plus: how Senate filibuster rules in Washington changes national politics; UPenn history professor Michael Katz revisits his 1989 work in the new edition of The Undeserving Poor: America's Enduring Confrontation with Poverty: Fully Updated and Revised, and your calls on appropriate holiday gifts for kids.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Caryl Stern, President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF

Monday, November 18, 2013

Caryl Stern, President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, talks about her travels around the world and the powerful and sometimes counter-intuitive lessons she’s learned about life. I Believe in Zero: Learning from the World’s Children reflects her—and UNICEF's—mission to reduce the number of preventable deaths of children under the age of five from 19,000 each day to zero. From Bangladesh, Mozambique, earthquake-ravaged Haiti, the Brazilian Amazon, she weaves together history, an account of the humanitarian crises at issue, and depictions of the people she meets on the ground.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Trans Fat Ban?; Bullying and Bonding; Ask an Astronaut

Friday, November 08, 2013

The FDA is moving ahead in the process to ban trans fats across the country. Marion Nestle of NYU talks about New York City’s ban on trans fats and what a national rule might mean for your food. Then: details from the latest “Unheard Third” report from the Community Service Society shows what New Yorkers want from the next mayor. Plus: a deep look at bullying, the NFL, and male bonding with Josh Levin and Emily Bazelon of Slate. And your calls and questions for “Ask an Astronaut Anything” with Col. Chris Hadfield, author of “An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth.”

WNYC News

New York, New Jersey Poverty Rates Are Higher Than You Think: Census

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

An alternative way of measuring income and expenses shows that many more people in New York and New Jersey are living in poverty than reflected in the traditional count.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Turning Food Past Its Sell-By Date into Healthy, Low-Cost Meals

Friday, October 18, 2013

Doug Rauch, former president of Trader Joe’s, talks about food insecurity, food waste, and his new project, The Daily Table. Rauch plans to open a restaurant/grocery store that will sell prepared food, fruits and vegetables that are past their sell-by dates yet are still fresh and safe to eat. He wants to use some of the grocery industry’s estimated $47 million of wasted food each year to help feed low-income communities.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ten Years in a Bronx Public School

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Laurel Sturt talks about her life in a high-poverty elementary school in the Bronx.Davonte’s Inferno: Ten Years in the New York Public School Gulag is a study of the crisis confronting today's educators and an indictment of the system.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Transforming a Community with Good Food

Friday, October 04, 2013

The Stop in Toronto that has revolutionized the way we combat hunger and poverty. Community worker Nick Saul became the executive director of The Stop in 1998, and he talks about transforming it from a cramped food bank to a thriving, internationally respected Community Food Centre with gardens, kitchens, a greenhouse, farmers' markets and a mission to revolutionize our food system. He’s the co-author of The Stop: How the Fight for Good Food Transformed a Community and Inspired a Movement.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Has Jeffrey Sachs Actually Helped Ease Poverty?

Monday, September 30, 2013

Nina Munk, contributing editor at Vanity Fair and the author of The Idealist: Jeffrey Sachs and the Quest to End Poverty (Doubleday, 2013), explores the success and failure of Jeffrey Sachs' efforts to find "the end of poverty" through his Millenium Villages Project in Africa.

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Schoolbook

School Lunch Prices Rise

Monday, September 30, 2013

For the first time in a decade, New York City is raising the price of its school lunches. Starting Monday, students will pay $1.75 instead of a $1.50. But, to offset the hike for some, the city will allow students who previously qualified for a reduced price meals to eat for free.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Smart Cities; Jesmyn Ward on Race, Poverty, Life and Death; David Bromberg Performs; Slavery and Universities

Monday, September 30, 2013

On today’s show: we’ll look into the forces that have shaped the planning and design of great industrial cities from the 19th century to the present. Jesmyn Ward talks about how the deaths of five young men who were close to her, prompted her to look at the role race and poverty played in cutting their lives short. Flat picking guitarist and vocalist David Bromberg performs live. And we’ll discuss the long, complex history that many of our oldest colleges and universities have had with slavery and emancipation.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jesmyn Ward on Men We Reaped

Monday, September 30, 2013

Jesmyn Ward talks about losing five young men in her life to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the problems poverty brings, particularly for black men. In Men We Reaped she writes of the agonizing losses of her only brother and her friends and of her exploration into the forces that shaped their lives and led to their deaths—the racism and economic struggles that fostered drug addiction and the dissolution of family and relationships.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

30 Issues: Policing; City Opera in Trouble; Global Poverty; Adam Curtis

Monday, September 30, 2013

The 30 Issues in 30 Days election series continues with a week of conversations about policing. New York State Senator Eric Adams and Pastor Gilford Monrose from East Flatbush discuss crime in the city; George Steel, general manager and artistic director of the New York City Opera discusses their financial troubles; Vanity Fair contributing editor Nina Munk on her new book The Idealist: Jeffrey Sachs and the Quest to End Poverty; and filmmaker Adam Curtis talks about this new collaboration with the band Massive Attack.

Freakonomics Radio

Would a Big Bucket of Cash Really Change Your Life?

Thursday, September 26, 2013

A 19th-century Georgia land lottery may have something to teach us about today's income inequality.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Inequality in NYC; Obamacare Fight; Pregnancy Myths; War Games; August Wilson

Friday, September 20, 2013

→ Note: Today at 2pm, a 30 Issues Twitter chat about education issues. Join @brianlehrer.

The poverty rate is up and the income gap is widening. Greg David of the CUNY Journalism School discusses new numbers on inequality. Plus: the politics of the budget fight over Obamacare; economist Emily Oster on her new book Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong--and What You Really Need to Know, the links between the video game industry and the military; and the August Wilson Cycle.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The American Way of Poverty

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Poverty in America is made up of both the long-term chronically poor and the new working poor—the tens of millions seriously affected by the economic downturn and cutbacks in social welfare programs. Sasha Abramsky argues that for the majority of Americans, financial insecurity has become the new norm. He looks at economic inequality and poverty, and suggests ways for devising a fairer and more equitable social contract. In The American Way of Poverty, he looks at topics from housing policy to wage protections to affordable higher education, and calls political changes and a new, more effective War on Poverty.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Poverty in America; John O'Hara's Stories; "Mother of George"; "Informant"; Mismanaged Drug Clinics in NYC

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Sasha Abramsky talks about how poverty in America has changed in recent years—and how addressing poverty could help reinvigorate our political system. Paris Review editor Lorin Stein and professor Steven Goldleaf discuss John O’Hara’s BUtterfield 8 and New York Stories. Screenwriter Darci Picoult and star Danai Gurira on the new film, “Mother of George,” about a newly married Nigerian couple living in Brooklyn. Plus, a film about a leftist activist who became an FBI informant. And we’ll look at the mismanagement of the city’s drug clinics and sober houses.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Scarcity Explains it All

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Using behavioral science, Eldar Shafir, psychology and public affairs professor at Princeton University and the co-author with Sendhil Mullainathan of Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much (Times Books, 2013), discusses why strategies for coping with scarcity explain the persistence of poverty, obesity, procrastination, and even loneliness.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Public Defenders and Justice

Monday, September 02, 2013

The 1963 U.S. Supreme Court decision Gideon v. Wainwright states that all defendants facing significant jail time have the constitutional right to a free attorney if they cannot afford their own. Fifty years later, 80 percent of criminal defendants are served by public defenders. Karen Houppert chronicles the stories of people in all parts of the country who have relied on public defenders in Chasing Gideon: The Elusive Quest for Poor People’s Justice.

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