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Poverty

The Takeaway

Will Crimea's Vote Trigger a Global Showdown? | Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 Reveals Blind Spots | Report Links Neglect to Deaths of Hundreds of Children

Monday, March 17, 2014

Airline Security Failures Emerge in Search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 | Will Crimea's Declariton of Independence Trigger an International Showdown? | Navigating Ireland's LGBT Movement | Looking Back at the California Mediterranean Fruit Fly Infestation | Report Links Neglect to Deaths of Hundreds of Florida Children | Living Paycheck ...

The Leonard Lopate Show

On the Father of the Sandy Hook Killer; Life in a Cape Town Township; Poverty in America; How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

Monday, March 17, 2014

On today’s show: New Yorker contributor Andrew Solomon talks about his conversations with Peter Lanza, father of Adam Lanza, who killed 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Harper’s contributor Justine van der Leun tells us about spending two years getting to know the people living in a township outside Cape Town, South Africa. For our new series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America, Sasha Abramsky and Chris Wimer talk about about how we have defined poverty over time. And Mohsin Hamid discusses his novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.

On Being

Paul Elie — Faith Fired by Literature [remix]

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Art, life, and religious faith converge in Paul Elie's unusual biography of the intersecting stories of four literary Americans of the 20th century: Trappist monk Thomas Merton, social activist Dorothy Day, and fiction writers Walker Percy and Flannery O'

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On Being

[Unedited] Paul Elie with Krista Tippett

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Art, life, and religious faith converge in Paul Elie's unusual biography of the intersecting stories of four literary Americans of the 20th century: Trappist monk Thomas Merton, social activist Dorothy Day, and fiction writers Walker Percy and Flannery O'

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Book Club: Random Family

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Leonard Lopate Show Book Club’s first selection for 2014 is Random Family: Love, Drugs, Trouble, and Coming of Age in the Bronx. Author Adrian Nicole LeBlanc spent years with one extended family in the Bronx to create a portrait of poverty, and of life in and of public housing, prison, and court. It received high praise when it was published in 2003, and remains as relevant and important a decade later. We chose it after we read Andrea Elliott's powerful New York Times series Invisible Child: Dasani's Homeless Life, which reminded us of the extensive reporting on a family's struggles with poverty in Random Family.

Share your thoughts and questions below!

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The Takeaway

Can You End Homelessness by Providing Homes?

Thursday, January 23, 2014

In 2005, Utah set out to end chronic homelessness within 10 years by providing each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. As they inch closer to their deadline, it looks like the state could actually pull it off: The state says the homeless population has shrunk by nearly 75 percent since Utah started its initiative. Whittney Evans reports on local government for Takeaway affiliate station KUER. She joins the program to discuss how this program works.

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The Takeaway

Transcript: Bill & Melinda Gates on The Takeaway

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

TRANSCRIPT: In their annual letter and in this interview with Takeaway Host John Hockenberry, Bill and Melinda Gates examine three particular myths: That poor countries are doomed to stay poor, that foreign aid is wasteful, and that saving lives leads to overpopulation. Here you will find a full transcript of their interview, along with the audio clip.

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The Takeaway

Money Addiction: How Much Is Enough?

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Wealth can be a tool for investment, for development and even for change. But wealth can also be an end in itself—becoming an addiction. That was the case for Sam Polk, a former hedge fund manager. In his last year on Wall Street, Polk earned a $3.6 million bonus. He felt it wasn't enough. Today, Polk explores why Americans love and possibly have an addiction to money.

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The Takeaway

Bill and Melinda Gates on the Myths of Poverty

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Since launching their foundation in 2000, Bill and Melinda Gates have granted nearly $30 billion to organizations and individuals working to eradicate poverty. In an interview on Tuesday with Takeaway host John Hockenberry, the couple talk about why poor countries aren't doomed to stay poor.

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Strangers

Born Rich (or Poor): Moby, Jamie Johnson and Others

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Just how fabulous is it to be fabulously rich? 4 stories of wealth--inherited and earned.   - Get the full story here.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Cost of Inequality in America

Monday, January 13, 2014

David Dante Troutt looks at the cost of inequality in the country. He writes of the problems facing working- and middle class-communities: fiscal stress, urban decline, environmental sprawl, failing schools, mass incarceration, political isolation, disproportionate foreclosures, and severe public health risks. In The Price of Paradise: The Cost of Inequality and the Vision for a More Equitable America, he argues that adopting policies that take all class levels into consideration.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Margie Stern on Helping Underprivileged Children

Friday, January 10, 2014

Margie Stern owner of the Manhattan store A Time for Children, which donates 100% of the profits to the Children's Aid Society of New York, discusses her work helping underprivileged children get a leg up in life through education. She's joined by Catherine Aponte and Blanca More Recinos, both part of A Time for Children's training program who have gone on to get college degrees.

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Slate Political Gabfest

The Political Gabfest: The "I Am Not a Bully" Edition

Friday, January 10, 2014

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring David Plotz, John Dickerson, and Emily Bazelon. This week: The Chris Christie scandal, the Republican poverty push, and the sad case of a brain-dead woman and her unborn child.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The 50th Anniversary of Johnson's War On Poverty

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Peniel Joseph, professor of history, founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University, and author, discusses poverty today, 50 years after President Johnson famously declared a "war on poverty" in America.

 

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The Takeaway

Should We Declare 'War' on Inequality?

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson stood before Congress and announced "unconditional war on poverty in America." Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University and Special Advisor to the United Nations Secretary-General Ban-Ki Moon, reflects on the 50 years since President Johnson declared the War on Poverty, and discusses the best policy solutions to eliminate poverty today.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Against Clemency for Snowden; The Role of the City Council Speaker; The Bisexual Label; War on Poverty Anniversary

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

While some are calling for NSA leaker Edward Snowden to be granted clemency, Slate’s Fred Kaplan disagrees. He explains his position. Plus: The new City Council convenes to pick a new speaker today. Capital New York’s Sally Goldenberg reports on the race and the evolving powers of the speaker; the bisexuality label and changing attitudes toward bisexuality; Peniel Joseph, author, professor of history and founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University, discusses poverty in the U.S. today, 50 years after President Johnson declared a war on poverty; and “because” – the American Dialect Society’s word of the year. 

The Takeaway

The 'Invisible' Homeless Children of New York

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Here’s a statistic that might surprise you: The United States has the highest child poverty rate of any developed nation except for Romania. Nearly half of all New Yorkers live below or very close to the poverty line. Children make up a large part of this population—in total there are more than 22,000 homeless children in New York. Andrea Elliot, reporter for our partner The New York Times, profiled one family caught in the shelter system in her five-part series “Invisible Child.”

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The Takeaway

How to Combat Poverty: Lessons from History

Monday, December 09, 2013

As the president and Congress debate the minimum wage and the efficacy of food stamps, a new book by Dr. Mical Raz challenges the underpinnings of our understanding of poverty and how best to combat it. In "What's Wrong with the Poor?: Psychiatry, Race and the War on Poverty," Dr. Raz argues that the theory of deprivation—which drove the Johnson Administration's approach to policy-making—led policy-makers to ignore structural inequality.

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The Takeaway

The Science of Charitable Giving

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Last year, Giving Tuesday brought $10 million in dollars of donations to charities, though it's a small sum compared to the billions of dollars spent on all other shopping days like Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday. Peter Singer, a bioethics professor at Princeton University, teaches a course on charitable giving and is the author of "The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty." He joins The takeaway to discuss why Americans don't give more.

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The Takeaway

Pope Francis Criticizes "Tyranny" of Unchecked Capitalism

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

On Tuesday, Pope Francis released an 84-page theological manifesto railing against what he called the “tyranny” of unfettered capitalism. The memo also calls for global leaders to fight poverty.  It’s not often that the leader of a powerful institution stands before those he represents and declares a complete change of focus. Reverend James Bretzke, Professor of Moral Theology at Boston College School of Theology and Ministry puts Pope Francis's remarks into historical context.  

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