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Port Jervis Line

Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: Bus Service Cuts Lead to Subway Ridership Boom, Bike Subsidies Lead to Better School Attendance in India

Monday, November 28, 2011

Top stories on TN:

Service on Metro-North's Port Jervis line resumes today, after months of storm-related repair. (Link)

Railroads are benefiting from the oil boom in the Montana/North Dakota/Canada area. (Link)

East Harlem bike lanes hit a speed bump. (Link)

Crowded subway car (photo by lizzard_nyc via Flickr)

A year and a half after the MTA's service cuts, more New Yorkers are riding the subways. (NY Post)

The booming redevelopment of New York's west side Hudson Yards is better off without the Olympics. (New York Times)

New York Times op-ed: the collapse of the car-dependent suburban fringe caused the mortgage collapse.  (For more on this story, listen to our documentary, "Back of the Bus:  Mass Transit, Race, and Inequality.")

A Los Angeles Times columnist takes a new bike lane downtown for a test drive. (LA Times)

A bill that would lead to the creation of Detroit's third bus system -- and its first BRT -- will be introduced in Michigan's state legislature this week. (Crain's Detroit)

More than 870,000 schoolgirls from the Indian state of Bihar have received subsidies to buy bicycles -- and now their school attendance rates have tripled, to 90%. (The Guardian)

 

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WNYC News

Port Jervis Line Reopens Monday

Sunday, November 27, 2011

WNYC

The Port Jervis commuter line, cleaved in two by raging floodwaters roiled by Tropical Storm Irene, reopens Monday.  The August storm washed out 14 miles of track, and was the most severe damage sustained by a transit agency in modern history.

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Transportation Nation

NY MTA to Spend $50 Million on Flood-Damaged Commuter Tracks

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Flooding and other hurricane damage on the Port Jervis train line.

The New York MTA says it will cost $50 million to repair a rail line in Rockland and Orange counties that was badly damaged by Tropical Storm Irene.

2,300 riders a day use the line, making it one of the mostly lightly used rail lines in the network.  (For our previous reporting on the decision-making that went into the decision to rebuild the line, click here.)

Train service on the Port Jervis line will resume in peak periods and many off-peak periods in December.

Engineers say flooding from the storm washed away thousands of tons of ballast and earth that supported the tracks along one 14-mile stretch in particular, where the rails are badly twisted and suspended in mid-air.

Trains on the line have been largely replaced by buses. The MTA says the replacement bus service will add another 10 million dollars to the tab by the time all service is restored to normal next fall.


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WNYC News

MTA Vows Full Service on Irene-Wrecked Port Jervis Line by Year's End

Monday, September 26, 2011

Metro-North Railroad said service along the length of the Port Jervis line of badly damaged by Tropical Storm Irene should be restored by the end of the year.

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Transportation Nation

MTA to Spend Millions on Port Jervis Line Repair

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Flooding and other hurricane damage on the Port Jervis train line. (Photo by NY MTA.)

(New York, NY - WNYC) The New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority is getting ready to invest millions of dollars to repair the Port Jervis train line on the western side of the Hudson River. The authority is paying an engineering firm $500,000 to figure out how to repair damage from Tropical Storm Irene.

That raises the question: why is the authority prepared to spend so much to bring back a relatively lightly used transit option?

About 2,300 riders take the Port Jervis train through Orange County on an average weekday. That's just a small portion of the thousands of riders who used to take the 37 bus lines in New York City that were cut last summer to save money. The B69 and B71 bus lines alone, which served Park Slope and Downtown Brooklyn, carried 2,300 weekday passengers.

MTA spokeswoman Marjorie Anders said the authority has no choice but to make the repairs to the Port Jervis line--and to run 55 buses among eight stations, seven days a week, until the line is fixed. She couldn't put a price tag on the substitute bus service but said it was attracting about half the number of passengers who rode the  train before the hurricane.

The storm washed out 14 miles of track, and Anders said there are no alternative transit options like there are in the five boroughs. "Compared to Brooklyn, Orange County's choices are very limited," she said.

Gene Russianoff of the Straphangers Campaign said he's conflicted: Port Jervis's ridership is low, but he agrees Metro North is the only way for many commuters to get to Manhattan. "It's the only means of transport for these people," he said.

Anders she said the engineering firm will come up with a price tag for repairing the track by the end of the month.

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WNYC News

MTA Readies to Spend Millions on Damaged Port Jervis Line

Monday, September 12, 2011

WNYC

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is getting ready to invest millions of dollars to repair the Port Jervis train line on the western side of the Hudson River. The authority is paying an engineering firm $500,000 to figure out how to repair damage from Tropical Storm Irene.

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