Streams

Pollution

Transportation Nation

Hell's Kitchen "Overwhelmed" by Buses

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

More than 8,000 buses cross the Hudson every weekday, bringing New Jersey commuters into Manhattan. But once buses get in to the city, there’s no place for them to park.

Read More

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

How Pig Poop Is Getting into Iowa's Drinking Water

Thursday, March 06, 2014

"The problem is that the soil itself is saturated, at this point, with manure."

Comments [7]

Last Chance Foods

Last Chance Foods: Something in the Water

Friday, June 07, 2013

Nitrogen pollution is threatening shellfish populations and the ecosystem of the Great South Bay. The Nature Conservancy's Nancy Kelley explains.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Pushing for a Greener Mexico City

Friday, May 31, 2013

Mexico City is one of the most densely populated cities in the world, with close to 20 million people living within its borders. For its residents, it is also an incredibly polluted place to live.But as the population, and the pollution, grow, we ask: Will Mexico City, and all major global cities, survive the centuries? In recent years, there has been a push to make Mexico City a greener and more sustainable place to live.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Problems with Pollution and Cancer in Toms River, NJ

Friday, May 24, 2013

Dan Fagin tells how a small New Jersey town was ravaged by industrial pollution. When a cluster of childhood cancers was scientifically linked to air and water pollution in Toms River, it spurred a decades-long struggle that culminated in 2001 with one of the largest legal settlements on toxic dumping. Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation is about the residents' fight for justice and about the pioneering scientists and physicians who first identified pollutants as a cause of cancer.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Pollution and Cancer in Toms River, NJ

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Dan Fagin tells the true story of a small New Jersey town ravaged by industrial pollution. When a cluster of childhood cancers was scientifically linked to air and water pollution in Toms River, it spurred a decades-long struggle that culminated in 2001 with one of the largest legal settlements on toxic dumping. Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation is about the fight for justice and about the pioneering scientists and physicians who first identified pollutants as a cause of cancer.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Aquifer Pollution

Thursday, January 31, 2013

ProPublica reporter Abrahm Lustgarden talks about Mexico City's plans to tap a mile-deep aquifer for drinking water, raising new questions about existing U.S. policy that allows water that’s deep underground to be intentionally polluted.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

How Healthy Are the Oceans?

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Fabien Cousteau, a filmmaker, oceanographic explorer and grandson of Jacques Cousteau, and marine toxicologist Susan Shaw talk about the health of the oceans and conservation. Susan dove into the BP oil slick in May 2010 to assess the impact of oil and the chemical dispersants used to clean the spill, which had a devastating impact on marine life in the Gulf and human health.

Comments [10]

WNYC News

Wayward Dolphin Dies in Polluted Gowanus Canal

Friday, January 25, 2013

A wayward dolphin that swam into a polluted canal on Friday died before high tide, marine experts said.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Link Between Lead & Violent Crime

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Kevin Drum, columnist for Mother Jones, discusses studies that demonstrate a link between the concentration of lead in the atmosphere and violent crime rates.

 

Comments [20]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Petrochemical America

Wednesday, January 02, 2013

Kate Orff, an assistant professor at Columbia University and founder of SCAPE, a landscape architecture studio in Manhattan, discusses the causes of sustained environmental abuse along the largest river system in North America. The book Petrochemical America combines Richard Misrach's photographs of Louisiana's "Chemical Corridor" with Orff's "Ecological Atlas"—a series of speculative drawings developed through intensive research and mapping of data from the region

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Shape of the Air

Monday, December 31, 2012

William Bryant Logan takes a close look at the air that surrounds us—what it is and what it does. In Air: The Restless Shaper of the World is an examination of the air we breathe, from the pure to the polluted.

Comment

WNYC News

EPA Proposes Gowanus Canal Cleanup Plan

Thursday, December 27, 2012

WNYC

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released its proposal to clean up the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn.

Comment

Soundcheck

Noise Pollution: Once In Cities, Now In Seas

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Thanks to humans, the world's oceans today are noisier than ever: Submarine sounds created by commercial ships, air guns and torpedoes have become a major issue -- particularly for mammals like whales and dolphins.

Comment

WNYC News

After Gowanus Canal Floods Its Banks, Fears of What's Left Behind

Friday, November 16, 2012

WNYC

Businesses along the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn fear toxic contamination may have tagged along with flood waters during Sandy’s vicious storm surge.

Comments [2]

Transportation Nation

This is What Air Pollution Sounds Like

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Oil pump near Taft, California (photo by Anna Conti via flickr)

Researchers in California have translated air pollution into futuristic soundscapes.

The website Atlantic Cities reports that scientists at University of California-Berkeley collected air samples from different locations across the state, then assigned tones to the different chemicals they found.

The authors write: "You can actually hear the difference between the toxic air of a truck tunnel (clogged with diesel hydrocarbons and carcinogenic particulate matter) and the fragrant air of the High Sierras."

Give it a listen.


According to the researchers, Bakersfield -- a town situated in California's Central Valley -- sounds a lot like Oakland's Caldecott Tunnel.  This is "the result of fresh hydrocarbons from a main trucking highway and oil and gas fields surrounding the sampling site."

Despite decades of progress, Southern Californians are among those at highest risk of death due to air pollution. The American Lung Association gives failing grades to more than half of California's counties.

Read more over at Atlantic Cities.

Read More

Comments [1]

WNYC News

To Get Cleaner Air in the Bronx, Environmental Officials Crackdown on Polluters

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

State environmental officials are working with community groups, elected representatives and businesses to enforce air pollution laws in the Bronx.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Adventures in the World's Most Polluted Places

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Andrew Blackwell talks about traveling to the most polluted places on Earth and considers what they mean for us. Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And Other Adventures in the World's Most Polluted Places is equal parts travelogue, expose, environmental memoir, and faux guidebook.

Comments [8]

New Jersey News

Vote on Controversial Newark Power Plant Expected This Week

Tuesday, May 08, 2012

WNYC

A vote on whether to allow Hess to build a controversial natural gas power plant in Newark will go in front of the city's planning board this week.

Comments [1]

Transportation Nation

NYC, 44 Other Regions, Blow 2008 Smog Standards

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

(photo by: harry_nl)

(New York -- WNYC) New York City and surrounding suburbs currently blow past smog limits set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The agency’s latest data, released Tuesday, found that forty-five areas of the country fail to meet air quality standards for ground level ozone.

The standards were set by the Bush Administration in 2008. They allow 75 parts of smog per billion cubic feet of air. As you can see on the map below, pockets of the country in almost all regions fail to meet air quality standards, but the bulk of "nonattainment" areas are along the Northeast corridor and throughout California. (See the EPA's designations for each area here.)

The agency said that the noncompliant areas were assigned a classification based on how close they are to meeting the standards. The classifications range from marginal to moderate, serious, severe and extreme. Most of the areas that do not meet the standards, including the New York region, are classified as marginal – that is, closest to meeting the standards.

The EPA said it expects these areas would be able to comply within three years, usually as a result of recent and pending federal pollution control measures.

“The standards are too weak,” said Frank O'Donnell, president of the DC-based non-profit environmental group Clean Air Watch. O’Donnell is pushing for the EPA to move ahead with low-sulfur gasoline. “Now that gasoline prices are dropping, we urge the House Energy and Commerce Committee to drop plans to kneecap EPA authority to see cleaner gas standards,” said O’Donnell.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s office said in a statement that the city has made progress on cleaner air... cutting greenhouse gasses by 12 percent below 2005 levels.

In an email, an EPA spokeswoman said it was a “coincidence” that the data was released on May 1st, World Asthma Day. Smog can reduce lung function and aggravate asthma.

Read More

Comment