Streams

 

Politics And Society

The Leonard Lopate Show

Billionaire Brothers

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

New Yorker staff writer Jane Mayer discusses Charles and David Koch, billionaire brothers who are waging a war against President Barack Obama. They have donated more than $100 million to right-wing causes; including the Tea Party. Her article “Covert Operations” appears in the August 30 issue of the New Yorker.

Comments [19]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro

Monday, August 30, 2010

Janice Perlman's 1969 book The Myth of Marginality was the first in-depth account of life in Rio’s favela. She carries that story forward in her new book Favela: Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro by re-interviewing many longtime favela residents whom she had first met in 1969—as well as their children and grandchildren—to reveal the effects of violence, drugs, poverty, and unemployment.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Election in Haiti

Monday, August 30, 2010

New Yorker contributing writer Amy Wilentz talks about the elections in Haiti. Her article “Running in the Ruins” appears in the September 6 issue of the New Yorker.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Afghanistan: Graveyard of Empires

Monday, August 23, 2010

Veteran defense analyst David Isby looks at the current situation in Afghanistan and discusses what he believes must be done so that the U.S. and NATO coalition can succeed there. His book Afghanistan: Graveyard of Empires: A New History of the Borderland sheds light on the challenges of the military efforts there and offers a blueprint for the country’s future.

Comments [7]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: The Filibuster

Thursday, August 12, 2010

The U.S. Senate is set to tally up a record-breaking number of filibusters this term, slowing down the operation of what was already known as the “world’s most deliberative legislative body.” Brookings Institution Senior fellow and George Washington University political science professor Sarah Binder talks about the increasing use of the filibuster and it’s long-winded history. Though it's commonplace in the modern Senate, the filibuster came about because of a minor parliamentary rule change in 1806.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Grave Abuses at Arlington National Cemetery

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Mark Benjamin, Salon.com's national correspondent and the reporter who first brought the abuses at Arlington National Cemetery to light, discusses how his year-long investigation culminated in both the firing of the top two officials at the cemetery as well as an ongoing Senate investigation. An Army investigation recently found gross negligence at the nation's most well-known cemetery—including over 6,000 misidentified graves, bodies interred on top of each other, and remains found in, what was assumed to be, an empty grave.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Hot Time in the Old Town

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Edward Kohn discusses one of the worst natural disasters in American history—the 1896 New York heat wave, which killed almost 1,500 people in ten days. In Hot Time in the Old Town: The Great Heat Wave of 1896 and the Making of Theodore Roosevelt, he tells how the heat coincided with a heated presidential contest between William McKinley and Democrat William Jennings Bryan. Their hopes for the presidency began to fizzle in the heat just as a bright young police commissioner named Theodore Roosevelt was helping the city cope with the dangerously high temperatures by hosing down streets and handing out ice to the poor.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Fortunes of Change

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Historically, the wealthy have been inclined to vote for Republicans, but David Callahan, a senior fellow of the think tank Demos, discusses why the rich in America are becoming more liberal. In Fortunes of Change: The Rise of the Liberal Rich and the Remaking of America he explores why some of America’s wealthiest people backed Barack Obama’s presidential bid, and are donating record sums to the Democratic Party and liberal organizations; even though they stand to see their taxes go up.

Comments [16]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Sydney Schanberg's War Writings

Monday, August 09, 2010

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Sydney Schanberg discusses his experience as a war reporter covering Vietnam and the Khmer Rouge-led genocide in Cambodia during the 1970s. Beyond the Killing Fields: War Writings is the first anthology of his war reporting, and commentary was drawn from the hundreds of articles he has written for the New York Times, Newsday, the Village Voice, and various magazines.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Time to Betray

Monday, August 09, 2010

Reza Kahlili tells us about the inner workings of the notorious Revolutionary Guards of Iran, which he witnessed as an Iranian man in the ranks spying for the American government. A Time to Betray: The Astonishing Double Life of a CIA Agent Inside the Revolutionary Guards of Iran is a chronicle of lives torn apart by a terror-mongering regime that brought an age of religious fundamentalism under the Ayatollah Khomeini, and an account of his decades leading a double life informing on Iran: the country of his birth.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Whistleblower Claims Denied

Thursday, August 05, 2010

Eight years ago, in the wake of the collapse of Enron, Congress passed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, intended to expand protections for corporate whistleblowers. But the Agency charged with carrying out the law—the United States department of Labor—has dismissed 98 percent of claims seeking whistleblower protection status. We’ll talk with Michael Hudson, a staff writer with the Center for Public Integrity.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Foreigner Carrying in the Crook of His Arm a Tiny Bomb

Wednesday, August 04, 2010

Amitava Kumar looks at the global repercussions of the war on terror. His book A Foreigner Carrying in the Crook of His Arm a Tiny Bomb tells the story of two men convicted in U.S. courts on terrorism-related charges: Hemant Lakhani, a 70-year-old tried for attempting to sell a fake missile to an FBI informant, and Shahawar Matin Siraj, who was accused of being involved in a conspiracy to bomb a subway. Kumar explores the experiences of ordinary people caught up in the war on terror and the growing suspicions about foreigners in post-9/11 America.

Comments [34]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jeffrey Toobin on Chuck Schumer

Thursday, July 29, 2010

New York senator Chuck Schumer, who sits on both the Finance Committee and the Banking Committee, has a reputation as a principal voice for Wall Street in Washington. New Yorker staff writer Jeffrey Toobin discusses why Mr. Schumer was nearly silent this summer, when his colleagues passed the most comprehensive overhaul of securities legislation in more than a generation. Jeffrey Toobin’s article, “The Senator and the Street” appears in the August 2nd issue of The New Yorker.

Comments [7]

The Leonard Lopate Show

U.S.-Pakistan Relations

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Much of the reporting around the “Afghan War Logs” that were released earlier this week by the Website Wikileaks has highlighted accusations of double dealing by Pakistan’s intelligence service, the ISI. Blake Hounshell, managing editor at Foreign Policy and contributor to the magazine’s Passport blog talks about the accusations and what the "Afghan War Logs" publication means for U.S.-Pakistani relations.

 

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Women Chefs

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

When this year’s James Beard award winners were announced, it was hard to ignore the fact that they were all men. Joining us to talk about why women only hold one-tenth of executive-level chef positions in the United States are: Joyce Goldstein, James Beard award winner and current James Beard award committee member, food journalist Laura Shapiro, author of the book Perfection Salad: Women and Cooking at the Turn of the Century, and Anita Lo, executive chef of the Michelin-starred restaurant Annisa and a former Iron Chef winner.

Comments [7]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The EU's Bank Stress Tests

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Last week the European Union released the results of the stress tests it ran on almost 100 banks. Matthew Saltmarsh, staff reporter for the International Herald Tribune, discusses the results and whether they’ll help restore investor confidence to the troubled Euro-zone.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Death of Climate Change Legislation

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

The New Yorker’s Elizabeth Kolbert looks at the political and environmental implications of the comprehensive energy and climate change legislation that died in the U.S. Senate last week.

Comments [7]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Top Secret America

Thursday, July 22, 2010

After the September 11th attacks, the government began rapidly expanding our national security and intelligence operations. Washington Post national security reporter William Arkin, co-author of the three-part series Top Secret America, explains how the system has become so large and so complex that no one really knows if it’s working.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress

Monday, July 19, 2010

Historian William Jelani Cobb looks at the 2008 election of Barack Obama—who won the Democratic nomination even though old-line civil rights leaders—Jesse Jackson, John Lewis, Andrew Young—all openly supported Hillary Clinton. In The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress, Cobb examines America's changing political and social landscape, and a new generation of voters with priorities not shaped by the legacy of Jim Crow.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Turkey and the Kurds

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Turkey’s Kurdish region in the country’s southeast has exploded into violence once again. We’ll get the latest from Aliza Marcus, author of the book Blood and Belief: The PKK and the Kurdish Fight for Independence.

Comments [1]