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The Takeaway

Gaza: A Day of Rage & The Search for a Cease-Fire

Friday, July 25, 2014

Yesterday in Gaza, an apparent Israeli strike rocked a school run by United Nations relief workers and killed at least 10 people. As the violence intensifies, international aid workers are finding it increasingly difficult to continue doing their job.

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The Takeaway

Plagiarism: From High School to Congress

Friday, July 25, 2014

The advent of the internet has had a profound impact on the rate of student plagiarism. From high school to graduate school, the impulse to copy-paste a sentence here and a paragraph there has only grown over the last few decades. 

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The Takeaway

Nixon: In His Own Words

Friday, July 25, 2014

Almost 40 years ago, Richard Nixon became the first president to resign from office, facing almost certain impeachment for his involvement in the Watergate scandal. The most damaging evidence implicating Nixon was 3,700 hours of tape, recorded by Nixon himself between February 1971 and July 1973.

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WNYC News

Brooklyn Palestinians on Gaza Conflict: 'We're not Cowards'

Friday, July 25, 2014

After a late-night encounter outside a mosque, Palestinians in Bay Ridge are bracing for more tensions.

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Slate Political Gabfest

The Political Gabfest: The Joe Biden's White Teeth Edition

Friday, July 25, 2014

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring Emily Bazelon, David Plotz, John Dickerson, and special guest Julia Ioffe. This week: The chaotic war in Ukraine, the continued fight over Obamacare, and profiling Joe Biden.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: A Day of Rage, Your Brain's Potential, and Coping When the News is Grim

Friday, July 25, 2014

1. Gaza: A Day of Rage & The Search for a Cease-Fire | 2. Plagiarism: From High School to Congress | 3. 40 Years After Watergate, New Film Lets Nixon Speak in His Own Words | 4. Preserving Your Sanity With a Vacation From the News Media

All Things Considered

Montana Senator Comes Under Fire For Plagiarism Allegations

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Sen. John Walsh of Montana was appointed to his seat, and he's preparing to face voters for the first time. The Democrat's bid will be complicated by plagiarism allegations.

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All Things Considered

Rep. Ryan Unveils His Anti-Poverty Plan, A Rebuke To LBJ Programs

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The Wisconsin Republican is rolling out a plan that he says will fight poverty more effectively than the programs launched by former President Johnson's War on Poverty, but progressives are skeptical.

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The Takeaway

Feminist Icons: From Rosie the Riveter to Beyoncé

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Just how flawless of an icon was "Rosie" herself?  And is it time we put aside the propaganda and found some new feminist icons? 

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The Takeaway

Tax Dodgers: U.S. Fears Firms Who Flee America

Thursday, July 24, 2014

A trend is catching hold among large corporations in the United Sates and it's consequences could be devastating for the corporate tax base. U.S. companies are increasingly deciding to relocate overseas to cut their tax bills. 

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The Takeaway

The Elusive Dream of Peace in Gaza

Thursday, July 24, 2014

It's already been a deadly week in Gaza and Israel, but a cease-fire seems no closer. Veteran Middle East negotiator Ambassador Martin Indyk says it's an unsustainable stalemate in an increasingly unstable region.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Investigating Corruption in Cuomo's Corruption Investigation

Thursday, July 24, 2014

A New York Times investigation argues that Governor Cuomo's Moreland Commission came under political pressure to restrict its investigations into statewide corruption. New York Times Albany reporter Thomas Kaplan discusses the revelations and what Moreland set out to do to begin with. Then we talk to David Grandeau, New York's former top lobbying official and an early critic of the Moreland Commision.

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The Takeaway

Arizona Inmate Takes 2 Hours to Die

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Yesterday, another execution raised the question of whether lethal injection is a barbaric form of criminal punishment. It took nearly two hours to kill Arizona inmate Joseph Wood, who was sentenced to death for the 1989 murders of his estranged girlfriend and her father.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fighting Corruption in India's Unruly Democracy

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Exploring the battle between the deep-rooted system of graft and patronage and the forces demanding change.

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Montana Sen. Walsh Says PTSD May Have Played A Role In His Plagiarism

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Sen. John Walsh lifted at least a quarter of his United States Army War College master's thesis, according to a report in The New York Times. Walsh was appointed to the Senate in February.

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Morning Edition

A Strange Political Dustup Clouds Kansas Governor's Future

Thursday, July 24, 2014

An open revolt among moderate Kansas Republicans has clouded Gov. Sam Brownback's re-election hopes and focused national attention on the tax-cutting experiment at the heart of his "red-state model."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Cheap Internet, Better Bathrooms, and Unsupervised Outdoor Play

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Chatanooga, Tennessee's public electric utility is working to publicly provide cheap and fast internet to its city. There's just one thing standing in its way: Comcast. Will this battle be coming to New York City any time soon? Plus: The New York Times's finds that Governor's Cuomo's investigation into corruption is "deeply compromised"; looking into the so-called "poor doors" in mixed-income housing; an argument for unsupervised outdoor play for children; and re-thinking American bathrooms.

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: An Elusive Path to Peace, A Church Scandal, and Modern Feminist Icons

Thursday, July 24, 2014

1. The Elusive Dream of Peace in Gaza | 2. Tax Dodgers: U.S. Fears Firms Who Choose to be 'Un-American' | 3. Arizona Inmate Takes 2 Hours to Die | 4. Feminist Icons: From Rosie the Riveter to Beyoncé

The Leonard Lopate Show

Past and Present: In India, Italy and Iraq

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Simon Denyer, former Indian bureau chief for the Washington Post, looks at corruption, the expanding middle class, and the people who are shaping democracy and politics in India. Joseph Luzzi talks about Italy’s passion for art, food, and family, and the country’s north-south divide, and why Italian Americans have a complicated relationship with the “old country.” The Sporkful’s Dan Pashman and Leonard debate whether a hot dog is a sandwich. Roy Scranton, a veteran who served in Iraq in 2003, on returning to Baghdad and the state of that country 10 years later.  

Democrats Make New Bid To Require Donor Transparency

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The latest version of the DISCLOSE Act, which would force donor disclosure on outside organizations that engage in election politics, is facing now-familiar opposition from Republican lawmakers.

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