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The Brian Lehrer Show

Anna and the Independent Voter: Targeting Minorities

Monday, September 05, 2011

Anna Sale, It's A Free Country political reporter, talks about independent voters, and how minority voters feel about the Democratic and Republican parties.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Tea Party: The End of the Two-Party System?

Friday, November 12, 2010

Doug Schoen, former political strategist for Michael Bloomberg, and Scott Rasmussen, founder of the polling firm Rasmussen Reports discuss their new book Mad as Hell: How the Tea Party Movement Is Fundamentally Remaking Our Two-Party System.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

30 Issues: Attorney General

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Dan Donovan, Republican candidate for New York State Attorney General, talks about whether or not there is a Democratic way and a Republican way to be Attorney General. 

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Modern Whigs

Monday, August 30, 2010

Gene Chaas, Northeastern region vice-chair of the Modern Whig Party, discusses his political party's resurgent popularity, and its place in contemporary politics.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

U.S. Senate: Which Party is the Most Tech-Savvy?

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Scott Galloway, clinical associate professor at the NYU Stern School of Business and founder of REDENVELOPE.com, surveyed U.S. senators on their digital literacy and the Republicans came out ahead.

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The Takeaway

2010 Primaries: Reading the Tea Leaves with David Frum

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

To many political strategists, pundits and observers, the results of yesterday’s primary elections may offer key insights to voter behavior in November’s midterm elections. Did yesterday’s results challenge the popular notion that the 2010 elections will be a correction to the Democratic majority in both the House and the Senate? Or was there even bigger surprises in the form of viable, Tea Party candidate?

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The Takeaway

Why Hasn't a Third Political Party Caught On?

Thursday, May 13, 2010

In Great Britain this week, a center-left political party — the Liberal Democrats — played the power broker in recent elections, teaming up with new PM David Cameron's Conservative Party to create the first coalition government in Britain in 70 years. Could a third party ever play kingmaker here, in the United States?

A new NBC/WSJ poll suggests that many people wouldn't object: More than 80 percent see problems with America's two-party system, and nearly one third of the country believes that America needs a third party.

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The Takeaway

Tea Party Express Arrives in Washington, DC

Thursday, April 15, 2010

Today is tax day. (So go mail in your paperwork or file for an automatic extension, folks.) It's no surprise that today is the day Tea Party activists have chosen to rally, across the country, against what they call, unnecessary government largess. There will be hundreds of small rallies in cities from Walla Walla, Wash. to Niceville, Fla. They are all loosely related to the Tea Party Express, which arrives in Washington, D.C. at 11:00 a.m., revved up after a speech from Sarah Palin in Boston yesterday.

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The Takeaway

Dems Eye Midterms without Dodd and Dorgan

Thursday, January 07, 2010

The Democratic Party found out this week that two of its stars will be setting: Senators Christopher Dodd from Connecticut and Byron Dorgan of North Dakota – who’ve served a combined 46 years in the Senate. Both announced they will not seek reelection in 2010.

Colorado Governor Bill Ritter followed their lead and also announced yesterday he’s ending his bid to keep his seat. These retirements come on top of a string of party defections and seem to weaken the Democrats... With us this morning to look at the political landscape and history, as well as what’s at stake for both Democrats and Republicans, is Jeff Zeleny from The New York Times.  We're also joined by Ron Kaufman, former White House political director; Republican National Committeeman for Massachusetts, and a close friend and advisor to Mitt Romney. Kaufman talks about what Republicans' strategy should be for the 2010 midterm elections.

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The Takeaway

Dem. Rep. Jim Clyburn on Ft. Hood, Health Care Plan

Friday, November 06, 2009

Yesterday, we spoke with House Minority Whip Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.,) about the Republican plan for health care reform. Today we talk with House Majority Whip Rep. Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.), who has just one more day to line up votes for the House Democrats' health care reform plan. Ahead of Saturday's expected vote, he joins us for a look at what's in and what's out in the Democrats' bill.

Rep. Clyburn also gives us his thoughts on the shooting in Fort Hood, Texas. (click through for a full interview transcript)

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The Takeaway

Rep. Eric Cantor on GOP Health Care Plan

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives aren't satisfied with the health care reform bill drafted by the Democrats, so they have written a health care bill of their own. There are significant aspects of the Republican bill that aren't yet clear, chief among them how much the plan would cost. An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office said the GOP plan would insure only 3 million of those currently without health insurance. By comparison, the Democratic plan would insure 36 million currently uninsured Americans. (Both estimates look ahead to the year 2019.) While the Democrats' bill would cover 96 percent of eligible Americans, the Republican alternative would cover 83 percent — roughly comparable to current levels. House Minority Whip Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) joins us with a look inside the Republican bill and his take on the nation's priorities for health care reform. (Click through for a full interview transcript.)

Join us tomorrow when Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.), the House Majority Whip, talks with us about the Democrats' health care reform ideas.

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The Takeaway

Washington Takeout: Rep. Rangel Squeaks By

Thursday, October 08, 2009

Rep. Charlie Rangel (D-N.Y.) is still the chairman of the influential House Ways and Means Committee, despite the fact that House Republicans voted to oust him from the chair. As expected, the move failed on a near party-line vote. But that doesn't mean Rangel is out of the hot seat. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, has the story.

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The Takeaway

How Health Care's Public Option Might Pass

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

In the Senate Finance Committee today, Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) are introducing an amendment to add the hotly-contested public option to the Finance Committee's health care bill. We talk with Douglas Schoen, Democratic pollster and former Clinton consultant, and our Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, explains the ramifications of the amendment.

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The Takeaway

Washington: All Eyes on Sen. Snowe

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.) had hoped that the Senate Finance Committee would be finished marking up his health care bill by Friday. As the deadline looms large, the committee appears to be slowing down, despite Democratic majorities in Congress urging quick action. The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, explains why time is of the essence and why all eyes are on Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine).

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The Takeaway

Baucus Caucus Far From Raucous

Friday, September 18, 2009

Senator Max Baucus (D-Montana) has been getting a lot of attention lately for his leadership in the health care debate ... not all of it good. Our Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich explains how isolated Baucus is these days on Capitol Hill.

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The Takeaway

Behind the Spin: What Americans Want

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Frank Luntz is a long-time Republican operative: a virtuoso of the focus group, a pollster extraordinaire and a master of message. In his latest book, "What Americans Really Want...Really: The Truth About Our Hopes, Dreams, and Fears," Luntz asks what ordinary Americans want – not from their government, but from life. And the results are a little surprising.

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The Takeaway

House Votes to Reprimand Rep. Joe Wilson

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

With a roll call vote of 240-179 mainly along party lines, the House of Representatives yesterday passed a resolution of disapproval of Congressman Joe Wilson (R-South Carolina). Wilson yelled "you lie" in the midst of President Obama's address to Congress last week; the House reprimand said that Wilson had committed a “breach of decorum and degraded the proceedings of the joint session, to the discredit of the House.” One of the “yes” votes on that resolution came from Rep. Laura Richardson (D-California), who joins us this morning. (click through for a full interview transcript)

For a refresher on Wilson's outburst watch the start of the ruckus below:

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The Takeaway

Politics and Politesse Around Health Care Debate

Friday, September 11, 2009

The biggest task for President Obama in his speech on Wednesday night was to take back the health care debate after a chaotic summer where unruly town halls and misrepresentations dominated the headlines. Yesterday, it seemed, some of that chaos continued, much of it centered on two words blurted by Representative Joe Wilson (R-South Carolina): “You lie!” Wilson shouted the words in response to the president’s claim that no illegal immigrants would receive health care under his plan. Yesterday, after a request from GOP leadership, Wilson apologized for his outburst, calling it "spontaneous." For a look at how politics changed for Republicans this week we speak to Representative Marsha Blackburn (R-Tennessee), a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has been working on its own health care bill. We also talk to Jackie Calmes, Washington correspondent for the New York Times, about the raucous disagreement between the political parties and what it means for health care reform. (Read the full interview transcript)

In case you missed the presidential address, here it is in its entirety:

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The Takeaway

The Political Effects of the Health Care Debate

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Health care, health care, health care. It’s all you see on the news, read in the papers, and hear on the radio. Will it pass? When? What will it look like if it does? What will things look like if it doesn't? We've been looking both at the broad strokes and picayune details of the various plans; today, we take a look at the potential ramifications of this debate on the political landscape.

The Democrats practically swept the 2006 elections and handily won the 2008 presidential elections, while the Republicans struggled with an identity crisis. But with this health care battle, has the G.O.P. found the grounds for a resurgence? Joining us with their take are Reihan Salam, from the New American Foundation, and Melissa Harris-Lacewell, professor of politics and African-American studies at Princeton University.

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The Takeaway

Translating the Health Care Debate

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

The facts. The skinny. The straight dope. If you're talking about health care reform (and who isn't, these days?), the truth has been thoroughly muddled lately with a lot of buzzwords, misnomers and outright fabrication. That's why The Takeaway is talking to Art Caplan. He's the director of the Center of Bio-Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, and he's going to put the health care debate and such concepts as the potential "co-operative insurance consortia" into plain-speak.

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