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Poetry

The Takeaway

Introducing The Takeaway Bike Challenge

Monday, September 16, 2013

Bikes are taking over America. Major cities like New York, Chicago and San Francisco are launching public bike sharing systems for the first time, joining Boston, D.C. and Denver. Get out your pens and poetry quills and join our Takeaway Bike Haiku Challenge. Today Adam Reilly, reporter for WGBH news; Alex Goldmark producer at WNYC with Transportation Nation; and Joy Diaz, reporter from KUT Austin Texas discuss the bike revolution.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Labor Day Best-Of: Gail Collins; Maya Angelou; Earl 'The Pearl' Monroe

Monday, September 02, 2013

Today’s best-of show on this Labor Day begins with New York Times columnist Gail Collins discusses her take on finding humor in Republicanism, her time on the editorial board, and her approach to opinion writing. Then, Earl ‘The Pearl’ Monroe looks back on his career at the New York Knicks and at some more recent starting line-ups; we hear about the rich history of the intersection of sports and politics; and poet Maya Angelou reflects on her family. Plus: two takes on gender in the workplace: first on overcoming differences, then on women farmers.

Studio 360

Aha Moment: Kenneth Goldsmith & John Cage

Friday, August 09, 2013

Kenneth Goldsmith trained as a visual artist at the Rhode Island School of Design.  In the 1980s, his work became wildly popular with collectors and was shown at some of the best galleries in New York City. “What I had become was a businessman,” he says. “And I did this so I wouldn’t ...

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Radiolab

'Why You? Why Now?' A Med Student's Journal

Saturday, July 13, 2013

A med student is paired with a patient her age. She does her job. They talk. They bond. The patient gets better. She's thrilled. And then ...

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Radiolab

Where's My Dinner? It Was Here A Second Ago — The Sandpiper's Dilemma

Monday, July 08, 2013

At first, you couldn't ask for a better meal plan. The food is free, delivered straight to you. It lands, literally, right at your feet. All you have to do is bend over and eat. Except: the portions are very small and tend to slip away rather quickly. That's why sandpipers seem so frantic when you see them at the beach. Their food keeps disappearing.

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On Being

Joy Ladin — Gender and the Syntax of Being: Identity and Transition

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Gender defines us from the moment we’re born. But how is that related to the lifelong work of being at home in ourselves? We explore this question through her story of transition from male to female -- in an orthodox Jewish world.

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On Being

[Unedited] Joy Ladin with Krista Tippett

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Gender defines us from the moment we’re born. But how is that related to the lifelong work of being at home in ourselves? We explore this question through her story of transition from male to female -- in an orthodox Jewish world.

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New Sounds

Latin American Poetry Settings

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Listen to contemporary settings of great Latin-American poets on this New Sounds. Hear a combination of choir and electric guitar by built around the poetry of Chilean poet Elias Letelier by Canadian composer/electric guitarist Tim Brady.  The work, “Atacama,” is sung in Spanish, with text about metal, circuitry, atoms and not thinking about microphones.  There’s also a work by the American composer Eric Whitacre and his setting of a text by Nobel Prize-winning Mexican poet Octavio Paz.  In it, the vocal group Polyphony together with a children’s choir simulate a storm by rattling tin for thunder and finger-snapping as rain.

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On Being

Sarah Kay's Way with Words [remix]

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Sarah Kay is a 23-year-old spoken word poet who has become a role model and teacher to teenagers around the world. She puts words around what she knows about poetry, stories, and being human and connected in this age.

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On Being

[Unedited] Sarah Kay and Krista Tippett

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Sarah Kay is a 23-year-old spoken word poet who has become a role model and teacher to teenagers around the world. She puts words around what she knows about poetry, stories, and being human and connected in this age.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Federico Garcia Lorca's Poet in New York

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

Federico Garcia Lorca, one of Spain’s greatest poets and dramatists. The current festival Lorca in New York: A Celebration, focuses on the years 1929-1930, when Garcia Lorca was a student at Columbia University and when he wrote Poet in New York. Laura Garcia Lorca, Federico Garcia Lorca’s neice and president of the Federico Garcia Lorca Foundation in Spain, and Christopher Maurer, editor of a newly revised and translated edition of  Poet in New York, talk about Federico Garcia Lorca’s life and work.


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WNYC News

One NY Artist: Poet Rob Vassilarakis

Saturday, May 11, 2013

There are thousands of artists is New York City. Some are famous internationally, while others are scratching out a living while perfecting their craft in basements or on stage. WNYC is bringing a few of them to the spotlight, in their own voices.

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Studio 360

Aha Moment: Mary Karr's "Entering the Kingdom"

Friday, May 10, 2013

Ten years ago, Beth Greenspan put a poem in her wallet that she’s carried ever since. Her son was just on the verge of adolescence, and she was wistful. “I noticed that his wrists were starting to get thicker, his hands were starting to look bigger. His hand was almost the size of my own ...

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The Takeaway

That's So Miami: Finding Poetry in City Life

Monday, April 29, 2013

April is National Poetry Month, and to celebrate the occasion, our friends at WLRN have been asking for local poetry that captures the texture of their city: Miami, Florida. Scott Cunningham, co-founder the city's biennial poetry festival, "O, Miami," talks about hometown pride, and finding poetry in everyday exchanges.

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The Takeaway

New Algorithm from the Times Finds Haikus 'In the Wild'

Thursday, April 04, 2013

The New York Times’ latest technological gadget is the haikubot, a poetry-seeking piece of software engineering that combs the text of every New York Times article as it’s published in search of the 5-7-5 syllable pattern that identifies a haiku.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Maya Angelou, Activist and Poet, Dies at 86

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

She wrote "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," mentored Oprah Winfrey, won a National Book Award, was friends with both Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr., and  famously delivered the inaugural poem at Bill Clinton's 1993 swearing-in. In this 2013 episode of the Brian Lehrer show, Angelou, who died Wednesday in her home, talked about her memoir, "Mom & Me & Mom," which chronicles the story of her relationship with her mother and the grandmother who raised her. 

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The Takeaway

An Iraq War Veteran Finds an Outlet in Poetry

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Hugh Martin served for nearly a year with the Ohio National Guard in the Iraqi town of Jalala. He is the author of a new book of poetry about his experiences called "The Stick Soldiers."

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On The Media

Plagiarism: Maybe It's Not So Bad

Friday, March 08, 2013

Artists often draw inspiration from other sources - from musicians sampling songs to painters recreating existing masterpieces. Kenneth Goldsmith believes writers should catch-up with other mediums and embrace plagiarism in their work. Brooke talks with Goldsmith, MoMA’s new Poet Laureate, about how he plagiarizes in his own poetry and asks if appropriation is something best left in the art world.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Amiri Baraka Reads "The Revolutionary Theater"

Monday, February 18, 2013

WNYC

Amiri Baraka died January 9th after weeks of failing health. He was 79. A playwright, poet, critic and activist, Baraka was one of the most prominent and controversial African American voices in the world of American letters.  Speaking at the Overseas Press Club ( and airing on WNYC) in 1965 following the release of his Obie award-winning play The Dutchman, Baraka presented himself as a no-nonsense artist who was not about to compromise his message for anyone. The talk catches Baraka (still known as Leroi Jones) at the height of his radical voice in the 1960s and is critical because it was delivered just four days before the assassination of Malcolm X.

 

The writer and activist LeRoi Jones (who would later be known as Amiri Baraka) speaks here on February 17, 1965, four days before the assassination of Malcolm X, an event that catapulted him from a charismatic Greenwich Village maverick into a radicalized black nationalist in Harlem.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Wole Soyinka On Africa

Thursday, February 07, 2013

Wole Soyinka, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, Nigerian poet, writer and playwright, and now author of Of Africa talks to Brian Lehrer.

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