Streams

 

Poetry

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Donald Hall looks at his barn, and back through time

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Donald Hall looks at his barn, and back through time.

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On Being

John Paul Lederach — The Art of Peace [remix]

Thursday, January 12, 2012

What happens when people transcend violence while living in it? John Paul Lederach shifts the language and lens of the very notion of conflict resolution.

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On Being

[Unedited] John Paul Lederach with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 12, 2012

What happens when people transcend violence while living in it? John Paul Lederach shifts the language and lens of the very notion of conflict resolution.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rita Dove on Twentieth-Century American Poetry

Friday, December 16, 2011

Rita Dove, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and former U .S. Poet Laureate, discusses The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry . Featuring poems both classic and contemporary, this collection reflects both a dynamic and cohesive portrait of modern American poetry and outlines its trajectory over the past century.

 

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The Takeaway

Helen Vendler, Rita Dove, and the Changing Canon of Poetry

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

The titans are clashing in the world of poetry. Over Thanksgiving, literary critic Helen Vendler published a savage review of a new anthology, "The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry." The book was edited by Rita Dove, a former Poet Laureate. Dove responded to Vendler's scathing review with an equally vitriolic reply. Vendler is white, and Dove is black, which is either tangential to, or central to, the issue — depending on whom you talk to. The incident has many in the poetry world talking about issues of race, aesthetics, and who belongs in the poetry books, and who does not. 

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On Being

Ellen Davis and Wendell Berry — The Poetry of Creatures [remix]

Thursday, November 24, 2011

How we see the world is how we value it, says Ellen Davis. And poetry is a way to rediscover the lost art of being creatures. An hour of learning and slowing down, with the "Mad Farmer" poems of Wendell Berry and a new way to take in the "poetry" of Genes

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On Being

[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

Thursday, November 24, 2011

How we see the world is how we value it, says Ellen Davis. And poetry is a way to rediscover the lost art of being creatures. An hour of learning and slowing down, with the "Mad Farmer" poems of Wendell Berry and a new way to take in the "poetry" of Genes

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Talk to Me

Lydia Davis and Eliot Weinberger Have High School Reunion at KGB Bar

Monday, November 07, 2011

Two famed poets, essayists and translators — Lydia Davis and Eliot Weinberger — recently read from new work at the True Story: Non-Fiction reading series at the KGB Bar in the East Village. Listen to the audio here.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Peter Sis on The Conference of the Birds

Thursday, November 03, 2011

Celebrated children's book author and illustrator Peter Sis talks about creating his first book for adults, an adaptation of the classic 12th-century Sufi epic poem, The Conference of the Birds. His adaptation tells the story of an epic flight of birds in search of the true king, Simorgh.

Original artwork from Peter Sis’s The Conference of the Birds is on exhibit (and for sale) at Mary Ryan Gallery, 527 West 26th Street.

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The Takeaway

Star and Director Explain What It's Like 'To Be Heard'

Monday, October 24, 2011

The new documentary "To Be Heard" follows the journey of three young friends through the world of the South Bronx and their experience in a life-changing writing class that teaches its students to grapple with identity, family issues, and the daily hardships of growing up in an inner-city neighborhood. 

"To Be Heard."  It follows their journey through the world of the South Bronx ... but also their journey through a writing class which seems to have helped them not only grapple with identity, but grapple with family issues and other things going on in the neighborhood that can sometimes be overwhelming for young people.
It's a film about how language can empower us.  
"To be Heard" is currently being screened in a variety of venues all across the country from The Hamptons to St. Louis.  It's directed by a team of four people including Edwin Martinez, who joins us now in the studio today and Karina Sanchez who stars in the film.  
MUST READ: Karina we just heard your voice in the film there ... how do you feel when you hear yourself like that

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Nobel Prize for Literature: Tomas Tranströmer

Thursday, October 06, 2011

Rika Lesser,  poet and translator of Swedish and German literature and author of several collections of poetry including Etruscan Things and Questions of Love: New & Selected Poems, discusses this year's Nobel Prize winner for literature, Tomas Tranströmer, his poetry and his place in the poetry world.

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The Takeaway

Tomas Tranströmer Wins Nobel Prize for Literature

Thursday, October 06, 2011

The Swedish Academy has awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature to 80 year old Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer. "Through his condensed, translucent images, he gives us fresh access to reality," the Academy said in a statement. Patrik Henry Bass, Takeaway contributor and senior editor at Essence magazine, talks about Tranströmer's work and influence.

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Schoolbook

From Poetry and Hip-Hop to Literacy and College

Monday, October 03, 2011

A week-long conference at New York University includes a series of workshops celebrating the use of spoken word poetry and Hip Hop as a means to educate and advocate for young people, by young people.

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Features

Allen Ginsberg's 'Kaddish' Gets the One-Man Show Treatment

Thursday, September 29, 2011

The Adaptations Project has adapted "Kaddish," which the beat poet published 50 years ago, for the stage. "Kaddish (or The Key in the Window)" is a multimedia one-man show that opens on Thursday night.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Poetry in Difficult Times

Friday, September 09, 2011

Marie Ponsot, author of six volumes of poetry, discusses how poetry can help us through difficult times. She reads from her work. Her latest volume of poetry is Easy.

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Studio 360

Poetry and Taxonomy

Thursday, September 01, 2011

When Studio 360 contributor and science reporter Ari Daniel Shapiro visited at the Japanese Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology last winter, he met Dhugal Lindsay.  The Australian researcher explores the deep seas using robotic submersibles carrying video cameras and sampling equipment.  And he's given names to some of the species he's found.

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The Takeaway

Talking With New Poet Laureate Philip Levine, Part Two

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Last week, the Library of Congress named Philip Levine as the next poet laureate, succeeding W.S. Merwin. Previous writers who were awarded that title include Robert Frost, Billy Collins, and Maxine Kumin. Levine was once an auto plant worker in Detroit, and that city became the basis for many of his poems. We spoke with Levine yesterday, about his reputation as a working class poet.

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The Takeaway

App Assignment: Submit Your Poetry

Monday, August 15, 2011

Last week, the Library of Congress named 83-year-old Philip Levine as the next poet laureate, succeeding W.S. Merwin. To mark the occasion, we’re asking listeners to submit their own poetry. Whether you’re a full-time bard, or just dabble in poetry-writing occasionally, we want to read your work.

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Studio 360

Philip Levine: From Auto Worker To Poet Laureate

Monday, August 15, 2011

Last week, the Library of Congress named Philip Levine the country’s 18th poet laureate of the United States, succeeding W.S. Merwin.  “He’s the laureate, if you like, of the industrial heartland,” librarian of Congress James Billington said of Levine. “It’s a very, very American voice. I don’t know that in other countries you get poetry of that quality about the ordinary workingman.”

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The Takeaway

Philip Levine Named as New Poet Laureate

Monday, August 15, 2011

Last week, the Library of Congress named Philip Levine as the next poet laureate, succeeding W.S. Merwin. Previous writers who were awarded that title include Robert Frost, Billy Collins, and Maxine Kumin. Levine was once an auto plant worker in Detroit, and that city became the basis for many of his poems. Levine joins us from his home in Fresno, California and talks about his reputation as a working class poet. 

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