Streams

 

Physics

The Leonard Lopate Show

Design in Nature

Thursday, February 02, 2012

Adrian Bejan takes the recurring patterns in nature—trees, tributaries, air passages, neural networks, and lightning bolts—and reveals how a the Constructal Law accounts for the evolution of these and all other designs in our world. Design in Nature: How the Constructal Law Governs Evolution in Biology, Physics, and Social Organization, written with J. Peder Zane, looks at how everything—from biological life to inanimate systems—generates shape and structure and evolves in a sequence of ever-improving designs in order to facilitate flow.

Comments [22]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The God Particle Announcement

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Lisa Randall, professor of science at Harvard University and author of Knocking on Heaven's Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World, reviews an announcement from the CERN physics lab in Europe that scientists may have glimpsed the Higgs boson, also known as the "God Particle."

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The Takeaway

Physicists Await Glimpse of 'God Particle'

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Near Geneva, Switzerland scientists from the European Center for Nuclear Research are scheduled to present preliminary evidence in their search to find the Higgs boson particle, commonly known as the "God particle." Proving its existence would validate the leading theory of particle physics.

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The Takeaway

Brian Greene on 'The Fabric of the Cosmos'

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Have you ever wondered why we see time move forward, but never backward? Are you uncertain about how time and space relate to each other? Do you wonder if there are other universes out there that are similar to our own? If so, you’re not alone. Physicist and bestselling author Brian Greene has been delving into these questions his whole life.

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The Takeaway

Adam G. Riess on His Nobel Prize

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

The Nobel Prize for physics was awarded on Tuesday to three scientists for their discovery that the universe in is being blown apart by a force known as "dark energy." Saul Perlmutter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brian P. Schmidt of the Australian National University, and Adam G. Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute at Johns Hopkins University will share the honor. Adam G. Riess discusses the honor and explains what dark energy is, and why it's important to the universe.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World

Monday, October 03, 2011

Lisa Randall explains the latest developments in physics that have the potential to radically change our understanding of the world—its makeup, its evolution, and the fundamental forces that drive it. In Knocking on Heaven's Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World she explores the role of risk, creativity, uncertainty, beauty, and truth in scientific thinking through conversations with leading figures in other fields (such as the chef David Chang, the forecaster Nate Silver, and the screenwriter Scott Derrickson). She also explains the latest ideas in physics and cosmology.

Comments [11]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Science Festival

Friday, June 03, 2011

Steven Weinberg, director of the Theory Research Group at the University of Texas at Austin and Nobel Laureate in physics and Brian Greene, co-founder of the World Science Festival, professor of mathematics & physics at Columbia University, and author of The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos, talk about the state of scientific exploration and education funding.

Comments [3]

Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: A Pendulum Dance

Thursday, May 19, 2011

The following post is from Robert's excellent blog Krulwich Wonders. You can read all the articles from Krulwich Wonders here.

Cinderella's Ball, This Time With Pendulums

What we have here is better, more cunning and a damn sight more beautiful than magic. It's a pendulum dance.

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Comments [10]

Radiolab

Nothing's the Antimatter

Monday, April 18, 2011

Just after the Big Bang, the universe was a primordial soup made of light. Then, it started belching out matter. Neil deGrasse Tyson explains how deeply shocking this is, and Marcelo Gleiser reveals an imperfection in the laws of physics that makes our very existence possible.

Comments [17]

Radiolab

Desperately Seeking Symmetry

Monday, April 18, 2011

From hair parts to the origin of the universe, how symmetry shapes our existence.

Comments [140]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Radiation

Friday, March 25, 2011

The crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant following the earthquake and tsunami in Japan has raised many questions about what kind of radiation is leaking and what the health risks of it are. Kenneth Mossman, Professor of Biomedicine and Biotechnology at the University of Arizona, and radiation physicist Jacqueline Yanch, senior lecturer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, explain radiation—from nuclear fallout, to airport body scanners, to x-rays and medical treatment. 

Comments [10]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Michio Kaku on Physics of the Future

Monday, March 21, 2011

Dr. Michio Kaku, professor of theoretical physics at the City University of New York and cofounder of string field theory, describes the revolutionary developments taking place in the fields of medicine, computers, artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, energy, and astronautics. Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 describes future advances in science and how they will change our way of life. Kaku also tells us who the winners and losers of the future will be, who will have jobs, and which nations will prosper.

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The Takeaway

Radiation Explainer: What it Does, Why We're Scared

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Since the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki the world has associated radiation with fear and horrible repercussions. That fear seemed somewhat justified during the cold war, and then after the Chernobyl disaster and Three Mile Island. But it’s easy to forget that we’re surrounded by radiation every day; that it occurs naturally. Or that we undergo medical treatments to fight diseases like cancer with radiation. Is radiation as scary as we think?

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

How Japan's Earthquake Altered the Earth's Time

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The earthquake in Japan devastated a country, but it also had a geological effect on the earth, changing the length of our days. According to physicists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, last week’s earthquake actually resulted in our days being shortened by 1.8 microseconds. Dr. Jean Dickey, a physicist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory explains that the mass of the earth changed in such a way that the rotation changed. However, she says that the days change fairly often following atmospheric changes and that, while the earthquake had a devastating effect on Japan, the length of the day is not something to be concerned about.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Brian Greene on Parallel Universes and the Cosmos

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Physicist Brian Greene discusses whether our universe is the only universe and explains recent science that shows our universe may be just one among many. His book The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos is a far-reaching survey of cutting-edge physics and a remarkable journey to the very edge of reality. He shows the range of different “multiverse” theories developed to explain the most refined observations of both subatomic particles and the dark depths of space.

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the Universe

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Richard Panek explains how we know that only 4 percent of the universe consists of the matter that makes up people, planets, stars, and galaxy. The other 96 percent of the universe is completely unknown. The 4 Percent Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality tells the story of how scientists reached this conclusion, and what they’re doing to find dark matter, dark energy, and to help paint a complete picture of the universe.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

2011: The Year Ahead in Science

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

2010 may be coming to an end, but a whole new year of news and culture awaits in 2011. All week long, we'll be talking with big thinkers about what they’re anticipating …from new movies to world events. Today, our subject is science, and our guest is the one and only Dr. Michio Kaku, theoretical physicist, bestselling author, professor at the City University of New York, and host of “Science of the Impossible.”

 

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Radiolab

A Recipe for Perpetual Motion?

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

A cat and a piece of jellied toast: could you break the laws of physics with these two simple tools? Check out this week’s podcast, Gravitational Anarchy, and be sure to listen for Neil deGrasse Tyson’s explanation of one of the more elegant and DIY paradoxes out ...

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Radiolab

Gravitational Anarchy

Monday, November 29, 2010

A mysterious case of the topsy turvies and a return to the question of what felines feel when they fall.

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Comments [127]

Radiolab

It's Alive?

Friday, October 08, 2010

There's no scientific metric for measuring a city's personality. But hit the streets, and you can see and feel it.

Comments [20]