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Philip Glass

Q2 Music

Brooklyn Rider's Nicholas Cords on Breaking the 'Fourth Wall'

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

The music of Philip Glass will always be inextricably linked with our very understanding of how to be a string quartet. Early on in our history as Brooklyn Rider, we decided to learn his String Quartet No. 3, which is an adaptation of his score for "A Life in Four Chapters," the brooding 1985 Paul Schrader film about the life of Japanese author Yukio Mishima. Despite the relative simplicity of the score's veneer, we quickly discovered a rich inner life to the music and learned much about ourselves in the process.

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Q2 Music

Chuck Close on Early Support for Glass from the Visual Arts Community

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

I met Phil in 1964 in Paris where he was studying with Nadia Boulanger and I was on a Fulbright grant to Vienna. We reunited in 1967 through the sculptor Richard Serra when we were both helping him make his early lead prop sculptures. Phil was working as a plumber and actually plumbed my first two lofts in what was to become SoHo.

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Mixtapes

Listen: Unreleased Philip Glass Mixtape

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

For this week's mixtape, Richard Guerin of Philip Glass's Orange Mountain Music label culls an hour of unreleased Glass, from a four-guitar arrangement of the composer's third string quartet to a student work from his days with Nadia Boulanger to a sneak peek at his Symphony No. 10.

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Q2 Music

New, Old and Unexpected with Tim Page (1978)

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

From a 1978 New, Old and Unexpected with guest Philip Glass, today's archival interview was first broadcast commemorate the radio debut of the composer's 1976 breakthrough opera, Einstein on the Beach.

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Q2 Music

Top 10 Essential Philip Glass Recordings

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

Philip Glass has been an extremely prolific composer, and has had long associations with two major record labels. Here are 10 recordings that will serve as an introduction to his hugely influential music.

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Q2 Music

Archival Interviews with Philip Glass

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

As part of Music of Constant Change, Q2 Music unearths diverse historic interviews with Philip Glass, collected from the 75-year-old composer's many visits to New York Public Radio.

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New Sounds

Philip Glass: Music of Constant Change

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

On tonight's show, John Schaefer recommends ten records to help skim the surface of music by Philip Glass, as part of Q2 Music's week-long celebration of Philip Glass, "Music of Constant Change." From the album, "Glassworks," to the Qatsi trilogy (three silent films by Godfrey Reggio with scores by Philip Glass) to the song cycle, "Songs from Liquid Days," sample some works that serve as a fine introduction to Philip Glass's hugely influential music.  Read about each of these "Essential Recordings" in depth over on Q2 Music's Festival Pages. Also, these works were just the excerpts on the show for radio.  To hear each piece in its entirety, try the Spotify playlist.

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Q2 Music

Kronos Quartet's David Harrington on Glass as Leader

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

For 30 years, the music of Philip Glass has played a large and vital role in the work of Kronos Quartet. His "Mishima" was our very first film soundtrack recording. The only concert we ever played in a graveyard was with Philip in Spain. It was Philip who introduced us to Foday Musa Suso, the great kora player from Gambia. We played "Dracula" together in Canada on the horrifying night that Al Gore won the election and then didn't. Then...

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Hammered!

Palpably Organic: Keyboard Glass

Monday, September 03, 2012

Let’s face it — the piano is organic to Philip Glass. His palpable patterns ring and echo with nostalgia and exuberance. He connects directly to our emotions with those gentle triadic, undulating piano figurations and trademark harmonic changes.

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Q2 Music Album of the Week

'The Passion of Ramakrishna' by Philip Glass

Monday, September 03, 2012

Philip Glass began composing for organ early in his career, and in a way, he never really stopped: His orchestration bears a resemblance to the tradition of Bruckner or Franck, treating the sections of the orchestra like the stops on an organ.

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The New Canon

Out of Somewhere

Monday, September 03, 2012

This week on the New Canon, we take an in-depth look at new recordings from Esa-Pekka Salonen, Vivian Fung, and Philip Glass. It’s Glass’s The Passion of Ramakrishna that’s our current Album of the Week as we enter a weeklong festival of the composer: Music of Constant Change.

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New Sounds

Movement and Repetition

Sunday, September 02, 2012

For this New Sounds, it's about repetitive motion. Hear the two-piano robotic toccata and other movements from "brazen" 24-year-old composer Timothy Andres’s "Shy and Mighty." Then, listen as Ted Reichman's slow-layered repetitive piano and organ phrases slowly build on his "My Ears Are Bent." Also, Dominic Frasca's got precision and angularity on his side as he taps and arpeggiates his ten-stringed guitar (augmented with some electronic processing) into musical impossibilities/improbabilities on his "Deviations." Plus, music by Philip Glass, and more.

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Q2 Music

Notes from the Beach with Einstein's Helga Davis

Friday, August 31, 2012

About a week ago I got on the subway at 23rd Street and Eighth Avenue and saw it — the advertisement for Einstein on the Beach which will be part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival.

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Q2 Music

Giveaways: Philip Glass Boxed Set and Grab Bags

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Throughout Music of Constant Change, Q2 Music will offer several chances to win exciting, essential recordings from Philip Glass's extensive catalog.

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New Sounds

With Brooklyn Rider & Martin Hayes

Monday, August 27, 2012

The new music string quartet Brooklyn Rider certainly does get around.  They’ve been part of Yo Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, recorded Debussy, write and perform their own originals, and even collaborated with the kemenchech (Persian fiddle) virtuoso Kayhan Kalhor.  They’ve just released a record of all five string quartets by Philip Glass.   Brooklyn Rider joins us in the studio for this New Sounds program, and they’ve brought an extra player – the Celtic fiddler Martin Hayes (of County Clare.)

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The New Canon

Music Married to Rhythm

Monday, August 27, 2012

This week on the New Canon, we sample new recordings of works by Bartók, Balakirev, Beata Moon, and Philip Glass. We also go in-depth with MSR Classics’s John Cage: A Tribute, a compendium of historic re-releases of the composer’s canon in celebration of his centennial. It’s our Album of the Week.

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Q2 Music

The Infamous, Elegant Arpeggios of Philip Glass

Saturday, August 25, 2012

Philip Glass is one of the only living classical composers, if not the only one, to have achieved any kind of popular celebrity. For people who "don't listen to classical music," his name still evokes his instantly recognizable musical signature.

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Q2 Music Live Concerts

On-Demand Video: Philip Glass: An Hour with Einstein

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

On Saturday, The Greene Space hosted a performance and conversation with Philip Glass and members of BAM's upcoming revival of his landmark opera, Einstein on the Beach. Watch it here on-demand.

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Q2 Music

Wish Philip Glass a Happy Birthday and Win Prizes

Monday, August 20, 2012

We want you to be part of our Philip Glass festival. Help us celebrate Glass's 75th birthday and the upcoming revival of his landmark opera Einstein on the Beach by calling in a story about your favorite piece of his. We'll then play your message during the festival, and you'll be automatically entered to win some special prizes. 

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New Sounds

Post-Minimalist Music

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Philip Glass’s piano works have had a longstanding and widespread influence – on the so-called Post-minimalist composers, but also on musicians working in the electronic dance world.  One of them is Francesco Tristano, who brings electronica’s repeating motifs back to the piano in his solo piece “The Melody.”  We’ll hear that, as well as several of William Duckworth’s “Time Curve Preludes,” often considered the first major Post-minimalist work, and a work from the late Canadian composer Ann Southam directly inspired by Glass’s piano works.

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