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Philanthropy

Features

Fashion and Art for Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Relief

Monday, March 28, 2011

From well-known designers including Tory Birch and Anna Sui, to thousands of lesser-known artists at Web sites like cafepress.com, New Yorkers are creating products and donating portions of the profits to Japanese earthquake and tsunami relief.

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Features

In Preliminary Budget Proposals, Mayor Bloomberg Recommends Cuts to the Arts

Thursday, February 17, 2011

The mayor's recommendations come on the heels of President Obama's proposed cuts to the nation's leading arts endowments on Monday.

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The Takeaway

Altruistic Organ Donor Harry Kiernan

Friday, December 17, 2010

At 57 years old, computer consultant Harry Kiernan is one of the few living people to have donated multiple organs. So far he’s donated one kidney, part of his liver, and is currently waiting to become a bone marrow donor. What’s more, Harry has given each of his organs to complete strangers. Harry tells us how being with his wife Denise as she died of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis 12 years ago motivated him to give all that he could to improve the lives anyone he could: even people he didn't know.

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WQXR Features

Ranking the Fifteen Top-Paid Non-Profit CEOs

Friday, October 29, 2010

Several arts executives make a new list of the top-paid CEOs running America's non-profit organizations.

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The Takeaway

Living Cities Aims to Stretch Philanthropic Dollars

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Later today, a philanthropic collaborative called Living Cities will announce $80 million in grants, loans and investments that it will split among five cities: Baltimore, Cleveland, Detroit, Newark, and Minneapolis-St. Paul. Considering the size of major American city budgets, an average of $15 million isn't actually a ton of money, considering some of the systemic problems facing each of those cities. Living Cities hopes to use the cash as seed money, aiming to to stimulate self-sustaining urban renewal projects that will help each area for years to come.  

So has Living Cities found a way to get the most ameliorative bang for their philanthropic buck?

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The Takeaway

Gene Epstein Asks Businesses to 'Hire Just One'

Monday, October 18, 2010

Can one man's charitable donations help turn around the nation's unemployment numbers? Philanthropist Gene Epstein thinks so. The 71 year old Philadelphia resident is using $250,000 of his own money to create Hire Just One, an initiative that encourages businesses to hire again by making a $1,000 donation to charity when a business hires an unemployed person and keeps him or her on the payroll for six months. Epstein joins the program to talk about his ambitious program.

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The Takeaway

Facebook Head Gives Newark Schools $100M

Friday, September 24, 2010

Newark Public Schools, which have been rated the worst in the country, have been given an infusion of $100 million from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.  The gift is a bonanza, but it is also highlights a school system in dire need. 

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The Takeaway

Your Take: What is Greed Good For?

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Tomorrow, Oliver Stone releases "Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps," the follow-up to his 1987 morality tale about the corrupting power of greed. The irony of the original film's most memorable line, "Greed is good," was never absorbed by a generation of corporate raiders, who seemingly took the character Gordon Gekko's advice sincerely. Gekko's line got us thinking, what is greed good for? America has a long tradition of wealthy individuals giving away large sums of money to good causes, just look at Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg's $100 million donation to Newark, New Jersey public schools.

What good can come of greed? What examples do you see of it in your own life? Read through responses and leave a comment here.

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On Being

Jacqueline Novogratz — A Different Kind of Capitalism [remix]

Thursday, August 19, 2010

The devastation of the Haiti earthquakes and the lack of infrastructure for responding to the disaster have deepened an ongoing debate over foreign aid, international development, and helping the poorest of the world's poor. Jacqueline Novogratz, whose

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On Being

[Unedited] Jacqueline Novogratz with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 19, 2010

The devastation of the Haiti earthquakes and the lack of infrastructure for responding to the disaster have deepened an ongoing debate over foreign aid, international development, and helping the poorest of the world's poor. Jacqueline Novogratz, whose

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Azi Paybarah

Bloomberg: 'Hard to See How Other States Can Be So Stupid'

Wednesday, August 04, 2010

WNYC

On a conference call today on increasing major charitable giving, Mayor Bloomberg and Investor Warren Buffett were asked what they thought about New York's new law reducing tax deductions on donations made by wealthy philanthropists.

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The Arts File

The Rothschilds Fund Arts, Israel and now, Cross-Cultural Dialogue

Friday, July 09, 2010

The Rothschild Foundations' Firoz Ladak and The WSJ's Shelly Banjo on the group's new model.

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The Takeaway

Bill Gates and Bill Gates, Sr. on "Showing Up for Life."

Friday, June 04, 2010

How do you raise a child who's going to grow up to be wildly successful? (And maybe even a centibillionaire?) That's a version of the question every parent asks themselves. Every parent wants their kids to be successful, to be wise, to be decent people. Very few, when their children are born, think, “I want my kid to be the world’s first centibillionaire.”

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The Takeaway

Finding Charity, Scarcity in this Recession

Thursday, November 26, 2009

We're entering the season for charitable giving around the country. But are the rising needs outweighing the charity? We check in with Susan Bond, who works in the trenches at the Samaritan Love Food Pantry in Kokomo, Indiana; as well as Melissa Berman, president and CEO of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, about the broader picture on charitable giving. (Berman mentions the government's public service site, Serve.gov.)

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Studio 360

Commentary: Incorporating Art

Saturday, November 22, 2003

Last spring, after Texaco cancelled its sponsorship of the Metropolitan Opera broadcasts, and then Chrysler cancelled its annual awards to designers, Kurt started wondering if there was some contagion of art indifference among big corporations.

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Studio 360

Simon Schama on Patrons

Saturday, February 01, 2003

Kurt Andersen asks historian Simon Schama to trace the golden chain between artists and their benefactors. Produced by Peter Clowney and Sarah Lilley.

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Studio 360

Anonymous

Saturday, February 01, 2003

When we think about support for the arts, certain names come to mind, like Mellon, and Guggenheim, and MacArthur. But in every concert hall and museum, the wall of benefactors is engraved with a few patrons who go by "anonymous." Who are these people? Produced by David Krasnow.

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Studio 360

Special Guest: Peter Lewis

Saturday, February 01, 2003

Kurt Andersen and philanthropist Peter Lewis talk about the art of patronage.

Peter Lewis is the chairman of the Progressive Corporation, an auto insurer that he transformed into a $7.4 billion company. He is an avid art collector and helped create the Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art. Lewis also serves ...

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