Streams

 

Peter Gregson

New Sounds

Tuff Strum

Monday, January 19, 2015

Listen to “Cello Multitracks” by Gabriel Prokofiev. The four-part suite calls for nine cellos, as realized by the technologically skilled cellist Peter Gregson, (yep, on all nine parts.)

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New Sounds

Tuff Strum

Friday, December 27, 2013

Listen to “Cello Multitracks” on this New Sounds program.  It’s Gabriel Prokofiev's four-part suite scored for nine cellos, as realized by the technologically skilled cellist Peter Gregson, (yep, on all nine parts.) The work is sometimes jarring, sometimes it grooves, then it will even scuttle like dust bunnies, whether plucked or scraped.

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New Sounds

Tuff Strum

Friday, November 02, 2012

WNYC

Listen to “Cello Multitracks” on this New Sounds program.  It’s Gabriel Prokofiev's four-part suite scored for nine cellos, as realized by the technologically skilled cellist Peter Gregson, (yep, on all nine parts.) The work is sometimes jarring, sometimes it grooves, then it will like as not scuttle like dust bunnies, whether plucked or scraped.

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New Sounds

Tuff Strum

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Listen to “Cello Multitracks” on this New Sounds program.  It’s Gabriel Prokofiev's four-part suite scored for nine cellos, as realized by the technologically skilled cellist Peter Gregson, (yep, on all nine parts.) The work is sometimes jarring, sometimes it grooves, then it will like as not scuttle like dust bunnies, whether plucked or scraped. 

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New Sounds

Electro-Acoustic Ambient Works(Special Podcast)

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

WNYC

This New Sounds program samples a world of ambient works, with music from composers based in Iceland, Germany, Scotland, Poland, Sweden, and a work from a Brooklyn-based metal guitarist.  Listen to pulsing percussive ambient music by Berlin-based Nils Frahm, along with some stasis music featuring harpsichord by the Polish composer Jacaszek. Then, from Iceland, there's a score from composer, producer (and former metalhead) Olafur Arnalds, "Another Happy Day," with electro-acoustic soundscapes formed around piano and strings.

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